Payne Furnace goes on then stops - help

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Old 01-05-08, 10:34 AM
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Payne Furnace goes on then stops - help

Have a Payne Gas Furnace which is about 12 years old. The heater would not start so followed the instructions on the door - shut off the gas, turned down the thermostat- waited 5 minutes and turned it back on. It would start but only for about 5 minutes and then shut off. Did this several times.

Suspect a gas leak as we smell a sweet metallic like odor.

Is there something else I should do? Have called PG&E but we are having a big rain storm so they are quite busy.

Any suggestions?

Roger
 
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Old 01-05-08, 12:03 PM
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The gas odor suggests that the hot surface ignitor is burned out.


You need to turn the thermostat all the way down.

Then take the panel covering the burner compartment off.

Have someone turn the thermostat up to 80 degrees and observe what happens.


The following is the sequence of operation that you probably should observe.


when the thermostat is turned on, a small fan motor switches on and comes up to speed.

You should then observe the glow plug ignitor get white hot over a period of thirty seconds or so.

The you should hear a click and hear the gas turn on for the main burner.

The main burner should light off the hot surface ignitor.





But since the ignitor is probably burned out, you wont see the ignitor glow. The gas will turn on for 3-5 seconds or so, but wont light, because the ignitor is burned out.

You are probably noticing the unburned gas coming from the burner at this point.


Because the furnace doesn't light, the gas for the burner shuts off.


To verify this, you need to identify and remove the hot surface ignitor. Usually you can see a visible gap in the ignitor, which proves that it is burned out. If you don't see that gap, you need to test the continuit with an ohmmeter.


If the ignitor is burned out, you need to buy a replacement at an appliance parts store, preferably one specializing in heating equipment. Take the burned out one with you.


My suggestion ---- buy a spare to have on hand.
 
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Old 01-05-08, 12:26 PM
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Hot surface ignitor

Wow - the heater responded exactly as you mentioned. There was no flame igniting and the heater then shut down within 30 seconds.

My question now is how to identify the hot surface ignitor so I can replace it?

Thank you
 
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Old 01-05-08, 12:41 PM
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The hot surface ignitor usually is located just in front of the burners, often on the right side of the furnace. It often has a loop of dark ceramic material that goes into a white ceramic bas withy a couple of wires coming out of it to a plug which allows the wires to be disconnected.

Usually there's a single sheet meatal screw that allows the ignitor to be removed when the screw is removed.

The ignitor is quite delicate and it's easy to break, so be cautious.
 
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