Replacement cost of furnace?


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Old 02-21-08, 04:12 PM
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Replacement cost of furnace?

I'm thinking of replacing my Nat. Gas Furnace - Gaffers & Sattler model AC125-5 (20+ years old) - with a new unit of the same - input BTU 100,000, Bonnet Cap btu 125,000

What can I expect to pay for a new unit? What is the approximate cost of installation with easy access?

I believe all of the duct work can be retained without modification.
 
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Old 02-21-08, 05:01 PM
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You will have to have some new duct. Hard to say what it would cost with out seeing it. Do you have AC.
 
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Old 02-21-08, 05:43 PM
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Furnace Replacement can be Green

I would almost tell you it doesn't matter what it costs that furnace was innefficient when it was installed and it has gotten worse since then the cheapest furnace you can buy today is 80% efficient so you need to figure out how long you will be there and what you want to spend but remember dollar for dollar there is no more effective way to green up your home than properly upgrading your home comfort system, your largest appliance
 
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Old 02-22-08, 10:30 AM
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The unit does not have AC. A cost/benefit analysis is unnecessary as it is probably time for a new unit.

I am seeking ballpark dollar amounts as I have never purchased a FAU.

I need to know:
1) Comparable unit cost $500?, $1500?, $3000?
2) Delivery/installation cost (assume existing ducting is adequate)

Thanks
 
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Old 02-22-08, 10:39 AM
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Wink

You say you dont have are need AC. So Id say go for the top of the line gas furnace that would be one with a AFUE of 90% or more. Like said not there cant see it . To say cost .
For sure get 3 bids for the sane set up. Also the furnace should be smaller than the one you have now when you go with a 90% AFUE one
 
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Old 02-22-08, 12:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Bruce C View Post
I'm thinking of replacing my Nat. Gas Furnace - Gaffers & Sattler model AC125-5 (20+ years old) - with a new unit of the same - input BTU 100,000, Bonnet Cap btu 125,000

What can I expect to pay for a new unit? What is the approximate cost of installation with easy access?

I believe all of the duct work can be retained without modification.
Hi Bruce,

You did not say where you were located which has some impact on your decision. If you live in California, a duct analysis is required when installing a new forced air furnace or air conditioner to minimize leakage, etc.

Additionally, unless you live in a very cold area, theadditional money saved in natural gas between an 85% efficient furnace and a 95% efficient furnace amounts to about 11%. If your house is poorly insulated or the windows leak air, you are better served by insulating and caulking than by getting the highest efficiency furnace. There is a steep premium for the "highest" efficiency and you just may not need it.

Before bidding out your furnace replacement job, do a little online or library research into what might be a good unit for you to own (I'm thinking Consumer Reports) and when you bid it out specify the same unit to authorized dealers of that brand so you are comparing apples to apples. Do not tell the dealers who they are bidding against.

Good luck.
 
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Old 02-22-08, 02:13 PM
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The house is in Southern Calif.

I didn't realize there were percentages of efficiency. The furnace use might be 3 months out of the year. I just had my painter caulk the windows and other areas.

The top of the DIY page has some advertisements - I'll start looking there for prices.

Maybe this weekends home show will have some vendors.

Thanks,
BC
 
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Old 02-24-08, 03:10 PM
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Hi again Bruce,

As long as you don't live in one of the higher mountain or high desert regions of So. Cal. your furnace needs are not going to justify the priciest, most efficient furnace. Because of our temperate weather, heaters don't wear out as fast here as elsewhere, especially if they are maintained properly.

In fact, your old Gaffers may have a few more good years left in it if it has been well maintained over the years and there are no cracks in the heat exchanger.

I recently rebuilt the 25 year old Gaffers heater in my roof mounted dual pack unit for a few hundred bucks and the results have been astonishing, efficiency-wise. I replaced the gas valve, ignition control unit, ignitor and flex gas line. I also insulated the plenum space to minimize heat loss in winter and heat gain in summer.

The ten grand saved is going to be invested in solar photovoltaics so electric utility consumption is reduced.

If you are mechanically inclined, going through your furnace is not a terribly difficult project, especially if it still works and you can wait til summer to work on it. The good folks who frequent this site will help you.

Good luck!
 
 

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