Replace entire system???

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  #1  
Old 11-04-08, 04:36 AM
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Arrow Replace entire system???

My gas furnace for 2nd floor is 8yrs old and is a contractor grade 80% eff. Goodman. A month ago the central air compressor for this system exploded! I know I need to replace the outside unit and inside coil due to severe rust on bottom of the coil, probably due to poor draining. My question is how far to go? .
Even though the furnace still works, would it be cost effective to replace the entire systm at this time, or just a new coil and air cond. unit outside? I don't know how many years of service this type of furnace usually gives or if there have been improvements made in the past 8 years that would justify replacement in this situation.

Any ideas would be greatly appreciated!!!
 
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Old 11-04-08, 04:49 AM
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Would get a better deal if you replaced at the same time. You could also get a more efficient unit than 80%. Don't no where you are at but you could go with a heat pump or heat pump and gas furnace. Id look at at least a 15 seer.
 
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Old 11-04-08, 06:31 AM
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I live in North Carolina. I had thought about a heat pump but in the heating months we have automatic themostats that reduce the daytime temp to about 60 degrees. It bumps up to 70 in the evening. I was concerned that this would cause the electric heat strips to kick in to cover the sudden increase in demand every day.

Any thought???
 
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Old 11-04-08, 08:37 AM
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Originally Posted by gsc11 View Post
I live in North Carolina. I had thought about a heat pump but in the heating months we have automatic themostats that reduce the daytime temp to about 60 degrees. It bumps up to 70 in the evening. I was concerned that this would cause the electric heat strips to kick in to cover the sudden increase in demand every day.

Any thought???
If you have a furnace, you would not have electric heat strips. Which is it? The heat pump will need EITHER electric heat strips OR fossil fuel furnace, but not both.
 
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Old 11-04-08, 09:39 AM
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This is a concern with heat pumps! But they have T-stats that will bring up the temp slower for set back temps. I will add that a 5 degree swing would be better. Also fuel prices are down now but what will they be in a year?
 
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