Where Can I Buy Inducer for Old Furnace?

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Old 12-17-08, 07:55 PM
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Where Can I Buy Inducer for Old Furnace?

I have a mid-1980's vintage ICG model LCA-100 gas furnace and the bottom of the inducer casing is 'bubbling' and rusting. This leads me to believe that the acidic condensate is eating away at it and the assembly needs to be replaced. As this furnace is old and no longer produced, where can I obtain this type of part? I am in Southern Ontario.

N.B., my CO detector is starting to show low levels (~30ppm) and I expect the inducer is where the leak may be occurring.

Any help would be much appreciated. Thank you.
 
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Old 12-18-08, 04:08 PM
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Inducer

If the furnace manufacturer is still in business, try to find a dealer or distributor in your area. You could also Google "furnace parts". You might get lucky & find something.
 
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Old 12-18-08, 04:29 PM
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I'm more inclined you have a bad heat exchanger, and that you are not getting enough cool down at secondary exchanger, and you are drawing in primary heat exchanger temps into the secondary. I have never seen an inducer bubble like that, even though I have seen the acid corrode a metal clip away that holds the fanblade to the inducer shaft, inside the housing. Excess heat seems more likely.

Feel that inducer where it is blistering and feel if it is hot. Also the entire pvc exhaust may be hot. Blistering without a hole in it to the house would not give CO. But a bad heat exchanger could. This could be a dangerous situation, as it may rapidly progress to even higher CO readings!
 
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Old 12-18-08, 05:05 PM
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Ecman51 is right. If you are showing a CO level, the heat exchanger is cracked and passing the gas to the circulation portion. Time to get a new furnace A.S.A.P.

I think a furnace is still cheaper than a funeral.
 
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Old 12-19-08, 06:38 PM
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Gentlemen,

Thank you for your thoughtful replies. You are correct that it is in fact not the inducer! Although the paint is bubbling on the bottom of the housing (around the drain tube connection) and I still strongly suspect that it is caused by the acidic condensate corroding it, it has no hole (yet). I sprayed soapy water on it as a test.

I thought about it being the heat exchanger but I figured if that were the case I would likely be 'blowing' CO throughout the house. As the CO remains concentrated in the furnace room, I felt I should look further at the overall exhaust system.

I used a trouble light so I could better see inside the workings of the furnace. I discovered the problem. Below and beside the inducer there is a 2" horizontal flue connection emanating from the heat exchanger onto which a 90 rubber hose is attached with a hose clamp. The other end of that hose is attached to a vertical flue pipe (with a hose clamp), and that vertical pipe has the small vacuum switch hose connections. The top of that vertical pipe has another 2" 90 rubber hose attached, the other end of which is connected into the side of the inducer (opposite the motor).

That 2" 90 bottom rubber hose is split open, and it is the culprit! I have temporarily duct taped it until I can find a replacement and the CO level has remained staedy at 'zero' ever since.

As the hose looks exactly like automotive coolant hose, I tried Canadian Tire as it was on the way home from the office. They had coolant hoses with a pre-formed bend but they were only 1-1/4" I.D., and I need 2". Can you advise where I can purchase 2" I.D. rubber hose with a pre-formed bend in it? It is ~6"x3" along the inside of the bend.

Thank you - and by the way, I agree that CO is a serious hazard and I do have 2 battery-backed-up detectors in the house, one in the furnace room and one near the bedroom doors.
 
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Old 12-19-08, 07:57 PM
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I strongly suggest calling a pro out on this one. CO IS DANGEROUS! While they are out they can fully inspect your heat exchanger for cracks! Also they can put a different co meter on your system and get better readings than you are getting
 
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Old 12-20-08, 05:03 AM
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Thanks maintelect. I am very much aware of the dangers of CO, and that is why I have two CO detectors in the house. To ease your mind on the heat exchanger, I should mention that I had a $350.00 'professional' service a couple of months ago at the beginning of the heating season.

Right now I just want to replace the split rubber coupling/hose, and I feel adequately qualified to undo two hose clamps, remove the bad hose, insert the new hose, and tighten the two hose clamps. If I run into difficulty, I would of course call someone.

Right now I am just trying to find out where to buy some 2" I.D. 90 bent (pre-formed) coupling/hose! Thanks.
 
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Old 12-20-08, 06:51 AM
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Hose

You might want to try some automotive supply stores. Chances are you are not going to find just an elbow but you might find a fairly short hose with an ell formed on one or both ends. You might be able to just cut the hose & use the ell.
 
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Old 12-21-08, 06:28 AM
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Thanks for the thought Grady. I was thinking along the same lines when I went to Canadian Tire, but their coolant/rad hoses were only 1-1/4" , and I need 2" I.D. So, as you suggest, I'll check to see if I can find a UAP or some other auto parts specialty store in Southern Ontario. Perhaps similar hoses for large trucks may be larger than those carried by Canadian Tire.
 
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