heating oil tank draws from very bottom


  #1  
Old 01-08-09, 02:12 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 1,060
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
heating oil tank draws from very bottom

put in new tank 2 years ago, new furnance 2 months ago. had problems and guy drained off 5 gal of water, debris from tank. Since I was almost out of fuel, I decided to completely let it run out and then clean it. I let it run almost completely dry, then disconnected line and put temp line from valve and drained rest out into buckets. The valve is on the underside of tank and When I look in tank, the valve looks like it draws from very bottom. There doesn't appear to be extension tube so that it doesn't suck any of the sludge from bottom of tank. my old one had valve hole on side about 2" from bottom. Shouldn't there be something in there to prevent furnace from drawing fuel from the very bottom of tank? going to remove valve and see if maybe i could sweat a little piece on it? Do you think I should do something so that I don't draw in sludge/debris from bottom of tank?
 
  #2  
Old 01-08-09, 02:29 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,682
Received 41 Upvotes on 39 Posts
Tank Valve

Don't do it. You don't want sludge in the tank at all, let alone
2" deep. You should draw directly off the bottom & the tank should be sloped 1/4"/foot of length toward the outlet. The idea is to get any sediment out of the tank & trap it in the filter.
Here is a link to Granby's installation specs. The measurements are metric (Granby is a Canadian co.) but it does mention 11" legs on the outlet end & 12" legs on the opposite end.
http://www.granbytanks.com/eng/pdf/SI0007_a.pdf
 
  #3  
Old 01-08-09, 03:05 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 1,060
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
thanks. My tank is a Granby and I actually called them twice and left messages and sent them an email, but they never responded to any of them. I think my legs are all same length and my contractor did not lift the one end. I was going to do so, but need to find something to use. I know that I can get some steel plates to use near me so maybe that is what I will do.
 
  #4  
Old 01-08-09, 03:27 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,682
Received 41 Upvotes on 39 Posts
Tank Legs

If it's a basement tank I wouldn't suggest trying to raise it by a full inch. If you get a half inch, consider yourself lucky & take what you can get. You don't want to stress the fill & vent pipes.
 
  #5  
Old 01-09-09, 08:01 PM
P
Member
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Brantford Ontario Canada
Posts: 103
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by hammerash
thanks. My tank is a Granby and I actually called them twice and left messages and sent them an email, but they never responded to any of them. I think my legs are all same length and my contractor did not lift the one end. I was going to do so, but need to find something to use. I know that I can get some steel plates to use near me so maybe that is what I will do.
Grady is right about not stressing the pipes.

If the tank was installed level, the warranty will be voided if the tank rusts out. Granby can tell if it was level or sloped by the debris marks and rust line inside the tank.
 
  #6  
Old 01-09-09, 08:24 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 1,060
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
It's an outside tank. I bought (2) 1" thick steel plates to put the legs on to tilt it to valve.
 
  #7  
Old 01-09-09, 08:42 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,682
Received 41 Upvotes on 39 Posts
Thumbs up Sloped tank

Good deal.
Here's another tip for you:
As close to the valve as possible install an empty filter can. Do not put a filter in it, just the empty can (the larger General 2A700 or equal is better than the standard 1A25A) to serve as a sediment/water trap. Put your functional filter as close to the burner as is practical. I like to see a felt or 'gear tooth' filter followed by a good spin on. The primary filter will catch the vast majority of the junk leaving the spin on as a 'polishing' filter. I've had mine like that for at least 5 years & have yet to change the spin on.
 
  #8  
Old 02-04-09, 02:16 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 13
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Grady,
can this double filtering system of yours slowly clean out a sludged up tank, or this will only maintain a system that's already clean?
I am getting water in my oil feedline, finally got a filter next to the boiler, still don't have a near-tank filter, don't know when the oil tank was last cleaned (previous owner allowed entire basement get covered in soot), and ill-maintained boiler is constantly getting dirt-related issues.

Every time I get a delivery, I also get problems with the boiler -- same day. (usually water)

So, what is my best order of action here? (I need as much detail as you can give).
Thanks :helpme 2:
 
  #9  
Old 02-04-09, 03:41 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,682
Received 41 Upvotes on 39 Posts
Water/Sludge

If you are getting water, the best advice I can give you is to try to tough it out until spring, run the tank as low as you dare, then replace the tank. The system I explained earlier is pretty much for maintaining an already clean system. The addition of fuel treatment products such as "Heet" or H.O.T. will help some but are no magic bullet.
 
  #10  
Old 02-04-09, 04:08 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 13
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
hmmm, replacing tank won't be so easy (it's at the back of a crawl space). I'm thinking a cleaning by tank cleaners is the best I can do then.
Have you heard of the product "water worm"? I found out about it from inspect-ny.com. Here:
H2O Control
 
  #11  
Old 02-04-09, 04:42 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,682
Received 41 Upvotes on 39 Posts
Water Worm

I have seen a similar product but never used it or talked to anyone who has. With the tank in a crawl space I know first hand how difficult removal can be but you certainly don't want a leak under the house. Often the tank has to be cut into pieces to get it out.
 
  #12  
Old 02-04-09, 06:26 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Atlanta, NY
Posts: 66
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Yeow - What kind of crap are they pumping these days? I had my tank in for over 30 years before I switched to NG. I drained the last 8 gallons from it (yes, 8 gallons) and no sludge & very little water. (It sat on a dirt floor in a damp cellar all that time). I changed the filter once a years and never had a blockage.

BOY, am I glad now I switched to NG after reading all of your comments!
 
  #13  
Old 02-04-09, 06:30 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,682
Received 41 Upvotes on 39 Posts
30 year old tank

You probably had a dealer who treated his fuel. Very few do these days.
 
  #14  
Old 02-04-09, 09:14 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 1,060
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Not sure I understand why you are suggesting replacing his tank? If it is in crawlspace, the water is coming from his fuel more than likely, correct. I mean he shouldn't have condensation like a tank that is subject to great weather changes-the morning sun beating down on cold tank causing condensation. so he will just have a new tank with water in it?

as far as getting it cleaned professionally, good luck. The people I tried to get basically told me it would be cheaper to buy new tank. I let mine run empty. Then I used some copper tube I had laying around and rigged up a temp feed line and then ran furnace off of 5 gal buckets of fuel while I cleaned the tank. I used a pressure washer and my shop vac. drained the water/sludge into big 5gal buckets that I will take to my local dump/recycle area.
 
  #15  
Old 02-04-09, 09:40 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 16,321
Received 39 Upvotes on 31 Posts
If he has an ongoing sever water/sludge problem then the tank is rotting from the inside out.
 
  #16  
Old 02-05-09, 03:47 AM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 12,682
Received 41 Upvotes on 39 Posts
Rotting from inside

Furd is absolutely right. Regardless of from where the water has come, most tanks degrade from the inside out.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: