Can I vent an existing Oil Burner?


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Old 01-30-09, 10:05 AM
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Question Can I vent an existing Oil Burner?

I have a typical oil burner that sucks in household air and sends the exhaust up the chimney. Now that I have been sealing foundation cracks, doors, etc for heating efficiency, the furnace is sucking air through the fireplace flue and any remaining seals/cracks. This has resulted in a smelly and uncomfortable situation. The furnace needs air. Is there an acceptable venting process to provide the air to the furnace without sending freezing air to the surrounding pipes in the basement? It is realtively a new furnace (approx 4 years old) but pulling the warm air from the house defeats any energy conservation methods I have recently implemented. Please advise. Thanks
 
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Old 01-30-09, 10:30 AM
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Old 01-30-09, 04:05 PM
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Combustion air

Here is a device made by Field Controls specifically for your problem. FIELD CONTROLS, LLC - CONTRACTOR PRODUCTS Combustion Air Systems
 
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Old 02-02-09, 03:10 PM
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Cool Thanks for the links, but one question -

Thanks for both links. I will look into both of these. One question - will bringing in the fresh air to the burner lower the actual heat output of th flame (compared to burning with pre-warmed home air) and thus negating any energy savings? If so, the home will still be more comfortable, but I imagine the burner would need to burn slightly longer to make up the temperature losses.
 
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Old 02-02-09, 04:28 PM
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Lower Flame Temp.

By the time the air actually gets to the burner after traveling thru the intake pipe it will have warmed some. Also since the outdoor air is colder it in theory at least will be more dense & contain more oxygen. To answer your question; in a nutshell no you won't notice any efficiency decrease. The fuel temperature has a FAR greater effect than does air temperature.

You're most welcome for the links. If you have any other questions, we'll do our best to answer.
 
 

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