Roth oil tank


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Old 09-07-09, 10:30 AM
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Roth oil tank

My first post...

I bought a used 2 year old Roth 620 liter oil tank,the instructions indicate that I do not use the suction assembly that came with the tank but instead use a duplex bushing with a straight pipe if installed outside where the temperature dips below -20. Now I realize Roth tanks have to be installed by certified Roth installers... for the warranty... but since this is 'used' Roth will not honor it anyway,so I am doing it myself. Has anyone here installed a Roth tank outside where the temperature gets very cold and used the duplex bushing ....and could tell me how it works?

Thanks.
 
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Old 09-08-09, 06:03 PM
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Roth Tank

The only Roth tanks I've installed have been indoors. If they are installed outdoors, they must be protected from the elements. The use of any flexible suction assembly on an outdoor tank is an invitation for trouble.
 
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Old 09-08-09, 07:34 PM
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I am removing the suction assembly along with the flexible hose thats inside the tank. I am replacing it with a copper pipe and a Roth part

I just want to know if anyone had any experience with this?

I am also covering up the tank to protect it from the elements.
 
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Old 09-09-09, 03:44 PM
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Double tap bushing

Don't use copper. Use steel pipe for your suction line. Copper often curls thus reducing the effective capacity of the tank. You can use copper if you use rigid pipe as a sleeve/guide.

I also advise against using a two pipe system. A Tiger Loop is a far better way to pipe to the burner.
 
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Old 09-09-09, 06:10 PM
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Hey Grady.... what do you mean by 'curls' ? If I use a straight type "L" copper pipe as a suction pipe ..it will curl?
 
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Old 09-09-09, 06:31 PM
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Copper Pipe

If by 'L' copper pipe, you actually mean type L copper tubing & slipping it thru the slip fitting on the bushing, yes, it will eventually "remember" it's original coiled shape & return (to some degree) to it. Screwing in a rigid piece of black steel pipe to the underside of the bushing & slipping the tubing thru it will prevent the curl problem.

If you are planning to use rigid copper pipe, it would involve soldering on a male adaptor to screw into the bushing. There should be NO solder joints in the fuel system. Thus the suggestion to use black steel pipe. DO NOT USE GALVANIZED PIPE.
 
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Old 09-09-09, 07:10 PM
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Thanks,Grady..

I am planing to do this with 1/2 diameter copper pipe... the furnace is located 15 feet way and 5 feet below the level of the tank... I will insulate the line ..do you think a Tiger Loop is an absolute?
 
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Old 09-10-09, 03:20 PM
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Copper Pipe

By using copper pipe screwed into the galvanized bushing you are begging for trouble due to a galvanic reaction between the copper & the galvanized bushing. Insulation not only holds heat but cold as well. Once that oil is cold the insulation is not going to help & can actually hurt. I am not at all an advocate of a Roth tank installed outdoors since there is no way to drain the condensation which is going to occur.

Unless you are going to use a true two pipe system (big mistake), I feel the Tiger Loop is a must. Failure to do so will likely result in the fuel system becoming air bound at some point.
 
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Old 09-10-09, 04:43 PM
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The bushing from Roth is all aluminum... I am plugging one side, the underneath part of it has another copper compressed fitting... there's no soldering to be done... no galvanize anything... a rigid copper pipe will be used inside the tank..so no curl will happen. The pipe insulation is the foam type that will be wrapped around the 1/2" flexible type "L" outlet pipe that will leave from on top of the tank and snake through the wall into the house.

Now I have to look into the Tiger loop thing...

Those things are pricey.
 
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Old 09-10-09, 05:45 PM
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Compression Fittings

The only time compression fittings should be used are as a device to lock tubing into place to prevent slipping. They should NEVER be used as a terminal fitting. Compresssion fittings will leak air. Remove the compression fitting from the underside of the bushing, thread your copper pipe into the fitting & use the pipe as a guide for the tubing. I refer you to Suntec's installation instructions here:http://www.suntecpumps.fr/Suntecus/P...tion%20III.pdf

Pay particular attention to the "Do Not" section on page 111-2.
 
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Old 09-11-09, 10:45 AM
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Roth

Looks like you need to have a special cover for outside installations.

http://www.roth-canada.com/cae/pdf/D...7-07_Final.pdf

Outside Installation (Single Tank)
Tanks used in outdoor locations shall be assembled only with the required covers (#3335100749 for the
400L and 620L, #3335100757 for the 1000L, #1135003721 for the 1000LH and 1135002054 for the
1500L) with the fill, vent and fuel gauge located inside the cover. For connection to the burner fuel piping,
open a knockout for the tubing to exit the cover and replace it only with a UL listed outdoor rated
bushing matching that tubing size to ensure a liquid-tight fit.
 
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Old 09-11-09, 10:51 AM
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Local laws dictate that I completely hide the tank in a build structure... so I will build a 2x4 frame and line it with durock and put a door on it..it will be waterproof..The fill/vent tubes will be sticking out the side....

.
 
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Old 09-11-09, 02:33 PM
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Outdoor tank

If local codes permit, since you have to build an enclosure anyway, I suggest insulating it well & installing a small, thermostatically controled heater. Even if you only maintain
40F (4-5C) your burner would appreciate the warmer oil.

The point I was trying to make with the PDF was the use of compression fittings.
 
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Old 09-11-09, 04:07 PM
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Thanks...I will use only flared fittings.
 
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Old 09-13-09, 09:03 AM
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Flare Fittings

The idea here is to eliminate air leaks & the fewer joints the better chance of not having a leak. A slip thru compression fitting used as a retainer at the top of the tank is actually preferable to a flare because there is no actual joint. With a slip thru the tubing continues, unbroken, into the fuel. Any time there is a joint, there is the potential for a leak.
 
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Old 09-13-09, 10:34 AM
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I like your idea.. I ordered the piece from Roth..but I might need to modify it for a 1/2 pipe to go through it...
 
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Old 09-13-09, 11:17 AM
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Piece?

I don't know what piece you ordered but if the bottom of the bushing is tapped (usually 3/8" pipe thread) simply screw a piece of 3/8" steel pipe in & the 3/8" O.D. copper tubing will slide thru it. (same is true using 1/2" pipe & 1/2" O.D. tubing) This will not only eliminate joints but keep the copper tubing from curling.
 
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Old 09-13-09, 12:52 PM
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I ordered this piece with the half inch outlets ... naturally in a one pipe system I will plug on of the outlets.I don't know how it looks from the bottom side. I supposed to receive it Wednesday.




I also cut on my band saw a 1/4 inch thick by 3 1/2 " piece of aluminum .... which I can plumb with a 1/2 inch pass through fitting.. if the Roth piece doesn't work out.

 
 

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