So I just stripped the hell out of the bleed nut


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Old 10-17-09, 12:44 PM
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So I just stripped the hell out of the bleed nut

So I got oil delivered today and I followed the instructions my uncle gave me on how to bleed the system to get air out so the boiler will start.

Well, everything went great until I OVER tightened the nut back in. Now, it won't seal and when the furnace running oil shoots out of the hole even with the nut in. And when i try to tighten the nut it just spins and never tightens.

I was thinking of trying teflon tape to seal it. I've used it before but only on regular plumbing. Anyone have any thoughts?
 
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Old 10-17-09, 12:55 PM
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Can you tell if it is the nut or the inside threads that are stripped?
A stripped nut is replaceable but if it is the housing you likely would have to replace it.

I can assure you that trying to seal it with Teflon tape is not in your best interest.
If it came loose when you were away it would be a disaster!
 
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Old 10-17-09, 01:19 PM
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Honestly--I'm not sure which is stripped. When I screw the nut in as far as it can go and if I turn the boiler on and push UP on the nut I can hear the actual furnace start to run and the oil stops coming out. But as soon as I let go of the nut the furnace doesn't make it's usual "on" noise and oil starts pouring out again.

The first time I pulled the nut out after I realized it wasn't sealing there were metal shavings on the threads. Now, if those shavings were from the end of the nut itself or from the housing it's screwed in to I have no idea.

It can't be that badly stripped since I can't actually pull the nut free from the housing. I can push up on it like I said earlier when it's in as far as it'll go before it just spins in place.
 
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Old 10-17-09, 01:44 PM
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ok so i'm looking at my bleed nut... the last half inch or so (the end that goes up in to the hole first) has absolutely no threading on it. Should it? I've never seen one of these before today and I'm trying to google for pictures. Should the entire nut be threaded or just the first half before the hole the oil bleeds through?
 
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Old 10-17-09, 02:40 PM
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You'd think you would be able to tell what is stripped.

But if you can't and/or you are uncertain if perhaps both are stripped, - first off, is the base of that bleeder screw beveled? If so, that is how it seats. It does not rely on the threads to do the sealing. That means you would have to go and buy a brass one that is beveled on one end, and may say for flare applications on the bag it comes in. The thread count per inch has to match! Take your bleeder screw with. Back home, try to tighten that one in and see if that gets tight. If so, then you know that all you have to do is buy a new bleeder screw, come Monday. And for now, leave that one in there.

If that also spins, then the tapped hole in the pump is (also) stripped. Then I'd call up a furnace outfit to see if they have a size up from your current bleeder, and tap out the bleeder hole to that new size, noting you have to buy a tap that is not for pipe thread.
 
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Old 10-17-09, 03:22 PM
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If you can move the screw when it is tightened then it is badly stripped.
You can not tap the body because there is a tapered section on the bottom of the hole that has to mate with the end of the screw.

You may have difficulty getting a replacement screw from a heating supplier because they are something that seldome gets replaced.
Your best bet is to try a seasoned oil burner mechanic who may have some old pumps kicking around.
There is a very good chance that you may have to replace the pump if the casting is stripped.

It is critical that this bleeder be secure so I wouldn't suggest you try any shortcuts.
 
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Old 10-17-09, 03:41 PM
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If I have a chance tonight I'll try and grab a picture of the bleeder screw for you all to look at it. If I have to buy a new pump how much do these normally run plus having it installed?
 
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Old 10-17-09, 03:41 PM
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I am wondering if they make the bleed screw softer than the body of the pump, just for cases like this, so the screw is the sacrificial part.
 
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Old 10-17-09, 05:16 PM
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Stipped Bleeder

Chances are you are going to have to replace the pump.
 
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Old 10-23-09, 07:37 PM
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Yea, I looked inside the hole today and it's mostly smooth so I stripped that. Ugh I found a pump for my exact model furnace online for $46. Should I order this and see if I can find a furnace guy to install it?
 
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Old 10-24-09, 04:28 AM
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Honestly, considering that you are in a relatively cold climate and depend on your furnace, I would suggest you find a reliable oil burner service person, bite the bullet and buy new.

There are some things that are prime diy endeavors but coming on this forum in the middle of a cold snap to get your heat going is not my idea of a fun project!
If you want to brave it though we will try to help.
 
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Old 10-24-09, 04:37 PM
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Replacing Pump

Replacing a pump ain't rocket science, pretty easy actually. The only thing one normally has to be careful of is the pressure for which the pump is set. What is the make & model of your furnace? If it has a Beckett burner, I can probably find the pump pressure online. Nearly all new pumps come set at 100# but some equipment requires a higher pressure.
 
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Old 10-26-09, 09:27 PM
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My furnace is a Beckett AFG. The pump that's on there now is this one.. SUNTEC A2VA-7116 SUNTEC SINGLE STAGE 3450 PUMP A2VA7116 - eBay (item 110174454033 end time Nov-14-09 07:51:12 PST)

I was just going to buy that and call a local guy to come install it. Honestly, bleeding a line is not supposed to be rocket science either and I screwed it up LOL.

So I'll just consider this one a failed endeavor and have a professional install it. I figure buying it for $40 off eBay will at least save me from getting ripped off on parts.
 
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Old 10-27-09, 11:23 AM
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How do you think you stripped it? Did you completely remove it, then cross thread it getting it back in? Or, did you really reef on it when shutting it off all the way? If it was the latter, maybe someone before you had actually done a lot of the damage. Ya.......let's blame it on him.
 
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Old 10-27-09, 02:58 PM
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Pump

Here's one from Patriot-Supply.
Patriot Supply -
You could probably have it in 1-2 days. Very reputable firm, good prices, & fast. I am in no way associated with Patriot Supply. Just trying to save you some time, possible hassle, & money.
 
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Old 10-27-09, 05:38 PM
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Originally Posted by ecman51`
How do you think you stripped it? Did you completely remove it, then cross thread it getting it back in? Or, did you really reef on it when shutting it off all the way? If it was the latter, maybe someone before you had actually done a lot of the damage. Ya.......let's blame it on him.
Nah, I take full responsibility for this idiocy lol. I actually did completely remove it and I'm almost positive I cross threaded it and that's how it happened.

Anyway, pump is ordered and furnace guy was called. Hopefully I'll have heat/hot water after Friday.
 
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Old 10-27-09, 06:07 PM
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Thanks...for being honest.

This will be an expensive lesson you've learned about making sure when screwing something back in, that you can first easily get some threads started by hand, before even putting a wrench on it.
 
 

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