gas piping size question

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Old 01-02-10, 07:12 PM
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gas piping size question

I'm looking at hooking a 75,000 btu hanging shop furnace in my garage. I have a 1/2" soft copper gas line running to my shop from my house, which is fed from a 3/4" black pipe which is only 5 feet long feed from a 1 1/4 black pipe. The run of 1/2 copper from house to shop is 125 feet. Is this going to work?


Thanks Todd
 
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Old 01-03-10, 12:41 AM
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need to know if you are on natural gas or lp gas
 
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Old 01-03-10, 01:14 AM
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1/2" pipe is too small, and copper tubing is no good.

I take it this is underground piping to your garage. Underground piping is highly subject to corrosion and leakage, and leakage from underground piping into basements and crawl spaces is one of the excellent ways to blow a house off it's foundation.

Frankly, installing the pipe is not a DIY job, although if you do the trenching and have a competent service agency install the gas piping you can save yourself some bucks.

The gas utility I used to work for used polyethylene pipe for low pressure underground fuel lines, and nothing smaller than 1 1/8" PE.

If the load was large enough (boilers for pools were favored) the utility would run the underground fuel line at no charge for customers. No harm calling your utility to see if they can offer you a deal on this job.

But decommission the copper tubing if it's underground. It's NG.
 
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Old 01-03-10, 06:36 AM
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sorry it's NG, in my area they use the plastic pipe underground aswell, but i was told by 2 gas fitters to run the soft copper cause the ends for the plastic pipe are $300 each. I was more concerned with the pipe size from the charts I'v seen it should be 3/4" black pipe, ut was told if i use soft copper because its smooth, and theres no elbows to speak of you can drop down a size in tube.....
 
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Old 01-03-10, 10:18 AM
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In central Wisconsin we use alot of plastic and copper pipe. Only seen problems with rotting pipes when they were the old steel pipes.
Now I need to know what all other appliances are on the gas line and there BTU ratings. (furnace , stove, ect.). And what part of Canada are you in. In our area we have various options with the gas supplier in the amount of pressure we can have delievered to a home but I need a little more info before I can further help.
 
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Old 01-03-10, 11:26 AM
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Originally Posted by skippie View Post
sorry it's NG, in my area they use the plastic pipe underground aswell, but i was told by 2 gas fitters to run the soft copper cause the ends for the plastic pipe are $300 each. I was more concerned with the pipe size from the charts I'v seen it should be 3/4" black pipe, ut was told if i use soft copper because its smooth, and theres no elbows to speak of you can drop down a size in tube.....

Yes, it costs money to run underground gas piping safely and correctly. It is not a DIY job in my estimation.

As a former utility gas fitter and utility repairman, I've seen a lot of underground piping and the problems it can have, and I understand the hazards underground gas leaks pose, which are significant.

My recommendation remains:

1) see if you can get or pay your gas utility to do this job for you.

2) find a contractor experienced in running underground gas piping to do the work for you. Few qualify, in my experience.

If you want to save yourself money, dig the trenchline yourself, although we has pneumatic punches that could dig their own holes underground pretty efficiently.

3) If you can't afford to do it right, don't do it.
 
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