Repairing vent pipe on a UST


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Old 01-28-10, 08:27 AM
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Repairing vent pipe on a UST

I bought a house a few months ago that has a 1000 UST. I was inspecting the vent and fill pipes the other day. The fill pipe is in great shape (galvanized).

I found the vent pipe to be nearly rusted through at ground level. I dug down 12" and found the pipe is rusty but solid over the rest of its length (picture the pipe having an hourglass shape to it). I'm thinking the rust at ground level was accelerated due to exposure to air and contact with the wet ground.

Anyway, I carefully broke the pipe at the thin area and installed a rubber plumbing coupler to insure no water got in the tank. The coupler overlaps the vent pipe ends by about 2" and is secured with a band clamp. It is rated for permanent use.

My question is, should I now leave this as is or should I attempt to dig down and replace the entire vent pipe? I'm afraid if I try to remove the pipe from the tank it will be frozen and I'll end up opening a can of worms.
 
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Old 01-28-10, 07:30 PM
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Vent pipe

Ideally the entire pipe should be replaced but in reality it's probably going to wring off or crush.
I suggest using what is called a Dresser coupling (galvanized) instead of the Fernco. Any plumbing supply house should have them.
 
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Old 01-28-10, 09:16 PM
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Pardon my ignorance, but what's a UST?
 
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Old 01-29-10, 03:57 AM
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Ust

UST is modern-speak for underground storage tank. It seems everything today is known by initials. I guess just a sign of the hurry up times.
 
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Old 01-29-10, 04:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Grady
Ideally the entire pipe should be replaced but in reality it's probably going to wring off or crush.
I suggest using what is called a Dresser coupling (galvanized) instead of the Fernco. Any plumbing supply house should have them.
I will go and get the Fernco. Do you think it would be worth while for me to dig down a ways, cut the pipe there and then install the Fernco with new pipe to the surface?
 
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Old 01-29-10, 05:28 PM
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Fernco

What you have is a Ferco. You want a Dresser.
I do suggest digging down a ways. How far is up to you. Keep in mind you are going to need a hole large enough in diameter to swing a pipe wrench of probably 18".
 
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Old 01-30-10, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by SeattlePioneer
Pardon my ignorance, but what's a UST?
What is really something is when one of our members here advises a greenhorn DIYer on how to fix something, and instructs the person using all kinds of abbreviations. As if the DIYer knows. Me thinks the reason all the abbreviations are used is for the poster to impress others here with their knowledge - not help the poster - (in the same way I see posters respond to a post from a month ago, or 3 years ago, and rattle off this huge explanation). How could the professional member possibly think the person asking the help would know what all that means?
 
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Old 01-30-10, 11:39 AM
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Abbreviations

In this case it was the original poster who used the abbreviation & used it properly. If you think abbreviations are bad on this board, take a look at the "boilers" board. Frequently PRV is used to mean either Pressure Relief Valve or Pressure Reducing Valve.
 
 

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