Not sure if my furnace is safe


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Old 02-03-10, 03:35 PM
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Not sure if my furnace is safe

My landlord could be worse. I just wish he would get a qualified tech to have a look at this 47 year old furnace.
The 20th Century Heating & Ventilation Company Akron Ohio.

Heating Approved
Date 8-7-63
Permit # 9697
Inspector Capt. Bednar
City of

Model GZ series GKH-100
Type of gas OPT. NAT.
Serial # KU-4252
Maximum input 100,000 BTU per hr
Bonnet Capacity 75,000 BTU per hr
Minimum input no value BTU Per hr
Approved as Gravity Furnace only
------------------------------------------------------------
I've heard it do this twice this winter.
It sounds like a turbo heater. It wasn't till the 2nd time it done this that I noticed what was causing the sound. Down by the pilot light there's this thing shaped like a trumpet with a small hole in the big end of the trumpet. For some reason the gas goes into this thing and ignites and creates some kind of eddy/current/back draft. I'm not sure what to call it but its got me a little worried.
Is it something serious.
 
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Old 02-03-10, 06:31 PM
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If I am correctly interpreting your description then yes, something is seriously wrong. It could be a maladjusted primary air shutter, a badly worn orifice or the most likely is a malfunctioning gas pressure regulator that is operating at a lower than normal pressure.

You need to pester the landlord until a qualified gas furnace technician checks it out and rectifies the problem. Worst case you might have to involve the governmental office in your area that enforces the landlord-tenant regulations.
 
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Old 02-06-10, 10:57 AM
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One more question. When the thermostat kicks the furnace on is it normal for a small low frequency boom.
I'm calling him right now!
 
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Old 02-06-10, 11:04 AM
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A slight whoosh when lighting is okay but a boom is never good.
 
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Old 02-06-10, 03:42 PM
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Sounds like a gun-type burner (trumpet description) and a severe downdraft. Fire makes that turbo like roar when it encounters a downdraft like that against the fire. And with a downdraft, the fire may not even ignite right away, causing a delayed ignition.

Have you paid attention to what the atmospheric conditions are at the times it has done this? And if you are exhausting anything out of the house, elsewhere?

You have heard it twice. But I wonder if it has done it to lesser degrees more often. If it has (since then you are more likely to catch it in the act), it be interesting for anyone servicing it to hold something in front of the combustion chamber or otherwise observe or feel for a wind blowing inward from the combustion chamber. If this is a common problem in this furnace, for whatever cause, the flame may be yellowed and create carbony soot, which is not good for the furnace or chimney.
 
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Old 02-06-10, 03:58 PM
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Not sure if my furnace is safe

If it a rental and you can documents claims that were not responded to, call the local city office that cover licensing and inspections of rentals.

He probably does not have records of maintenance or inspections tied to dates or recently.

You have live in the building and not him.

We have an active building inspection department/program for inspections and they would be out within a couple of days after asking for records. If repairs are not made or records are not provided, repairs are made inspector, his rental license would be revoked. We also have a problem with absentee owners not maintaining the necessary minimum standards in out townhouse (4 unit quads) development. If the repairs are not made, the association can hire a contractor to make the unit safe for the connecting neighbors and the amount (usually not paid) is just added to a lien on the property and must be paid before it is sold (plus legal charges and interest) before he gets a penny.
 
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Old 02-09-10, 03:31 AM
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Landlords so called HVAC Tech showed up.

Originally Posted by furd
If I am correctly interpreting your description then yes, something is seriously wrong. It could be a maladjusted primary air shutter, a badly worn orifice or the most likely is a malfunctioning gas pressure regulator that is operating at a lower than normal pressure.

You need to pester the landlord until a qualified gas furnace technician checks it out and rectifies the problem. Worst case you might have to involve the governmental office in your area that enforces the landlord-tenant regulations.
Some guy showed up yesterday afternoon. I told him about the 3 things you explained to me.

1. maladjusted primary air shutter
2.a badly worn orifice
3.malfunctioning gas pressure regulator

I asked him about the air shutter. And I sat and watched him adjust this. He just use channel locks on a .75 inch gas line and with the furnace running he just spun the trumpet right or left. I guess he was just waiting for it to sound right and look right. All he had with him was a tool box. After he made his final adjustment the flames were still awfully yellow.

Then I asked about the orifice and the Pressure regulator. Which was a mistake asking 2 questions at once. I never got an answer about the orifice.

I think this was the answer for the pressure regulator...
He mentioned what e\Ecman51 said:
"what the atmospheric conditions are at the times it has done this"

Basically what I think he was trying to say was that the weather affects the pressure regulator at the gas meter. I guess.

This guy was more knowledgeable about furnaces than I am but I still don't know if he was a certified tech.
 
 

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