Removing baseboards


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Old 08-04-10, 07:10 PM
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Removing baseboards

Hi,

I need to remove a couple baseboards in my house, 1 of them is a temporary removal and will be replaced in a different location, the other is a permanant removal.

What I need to know is exactly how I should go about doing this. I have a general idea that I would want to shut off the main water feed to the boiler, bleed the pressure, cut the pipe and let it drain, remove the baseboard and run a length of copper pipe to complete the "circuit" and let the water flow as if the baseboard was still there. My first hurdle is exactly how to bleed the pressure from the boiler. The boiler is also my hot water heater, so even though it is summer and very warm in PA right now, I need it operational after the night is done.

I have a Burnham Low Pressure Boiler - RSA 110 TH-TB

Below are a few pictures of my set up. Any advice or instructions would be greatly appreciated. My dad and I are quite handy and I'm sure we can figure this out, I just want to make sure I still have hot water at the end of the night.









Thanks in advance for any help, I appreciate it.
 
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Old 08-08-10, 07:55 PM
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Relieving Pressure

Sorry for the slow reply. I've been down for the past week or so.

The pressure can be relieved via the hose bib above the circulator pump.
 
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Old 08-10-10, 06:52 AM
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Hi,

We gave it a try last night but was un-successful. I thought I could just drain the Heating portion of the boiler and not affect the domestic water portion. Is this accurate or must I completely shut it down and drain it?

I closed the valve directly above the circulator pump and opened the hose bib above that valve. Water started draining but soon the boiler kicked on and the water started getting hot. Do I need to completely shut the boiler down and open that hose bib and let it drain? and make sure anything I remove is capped off and turn the boiler back on? I figured since it's summer and I'm not currently using the heating part of the boiler I'd be able to let the pipes hang open for now... is that false?

thanks again,
 
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Old 08-10-10, 06:09 PM
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Draining

At a minimum you will have to shut off the water coming into the boiler. There should be a valve upstream of the reducing valve (grey device high in the third picture).

Not having a picture of the location of the expansion tank it's hard to tell if you will be able to leave the pipes open or not.
An easy way to cap off pipes you cut is to use Shark Bite caps. SharkBite® Push-Fit Fittings | Cash Acme
If you can't find caps, you can use a male adaptor & pipe cap. Soldering a cap on a pipe, especially one which may have a little residual water in it, is often a tough job for the average do it yourselfer (no offense intended).
 
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Old 08-10-10, 06:57 PM
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Theres a picture including the expansion tank... I see the valve above the reducing valve that you are talking about. I should close that valve and then bleed the boiler with the hose bib above the circulator pump (all the way to the left in the picture)?

I take it I should shut the power off to the boiler before draining it, correct?

Also - if I bleed it, take out the parts I need/cap off any things necessary... will I be OK to just start the boiler up again? any air in the system will automatically be bled out, or is that necessary?

sorry for all the questions, thanks for all the help so far.
 
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Old 08-10-10, 07:24 PM
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Good News (?)

If what I see just on the other side of the beam on which the knife switch is mounted is an orange hand wheeled valve & that valve is in the line which comes from the flow check (green device +/- 18" above the top of the boiler), we just got lucky.

Close the valve in the line with the flow check.
Close the valve above the circulator.
Open hose bib & let'er drain.

IF I'm not mistaken & the valves hold, you should not have to shut the valve upstream of the reducing valve & you should be able to operate the boiler as normal for domestic hot water without having to cap pipes.

NOTE: Since there is no way to let air into the system I suggest leaving the hose bib open (with a hose going to a sump pump or bucket) at least overnight to allow as much drainage as possible. Once you cut the pipe, water is likely to come gushing out but it shouldn't be more that a gallon or two so have a bucket handy & preferably a helper.
 
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Old 08-10-10, 07:29 PM
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that is correct, there is a valve above the green flowcheck... I'll give it a try tomorrow night... shut the valve above the flowcheck, and the valve above the circulator, and then open the bib above the circulator.

should I cut the power to the boiler before I do this, or it shouldn't matter since I'm not affecting the domestic water lines?

thanks!
 
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Old 08-11-10, 05:23 AM
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I was able to drain it last night before I went to bed, and still take a shower this morning.

Thanks for the help.

Just one last question, when it comes time to put the one baseboard back in and get the heat going again, what is the procedure for that?
 
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Old 08-11-10, 05:50 PM
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Re-installing Baseboard

First of all, if you are lacking in soldering skills, don't even try it. Far less frustrating to hire someone.

Obviously you will need couplings for the copper pipe. I usually use repair or slip couplings instead of those with a stop in the center.

Once the connections are made, open the orange valve near the beam. Connect a hose to the hose bib above the circulator, open the hose bib & allow water to flow until you get no more air. This could take many gallons. Close the hose bib & open the valve above the circulator. You should be in business.
 
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Old 08-11-10, 06:14 PM
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excellent, thank you!!!!

I have a friend who is a plumber so I'll probably have him assist me with the soldering. Just didn't want to get him involved with the draining and what not cause I figured I could figure it out. (which I have you to thank for that)

I appreciate the help with this, thanks again
 
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Old 08-11-10, 06:19 PM
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Good Move

It is indeed a wise man who knows his limitations. Glad I could help. If you have any other questions, please don't hesitate to ask.
 
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Old 10-21-10, 09:39 AM
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Hi, I have another question. I am not going to have my kitchen ready in time to get the new baseboard in before I need heat. Am I able to just cap the pipes off in the basement that I cut to remove the old baseboards or should I connect them and loop it?

Also - I removed one small baseboard. Is it safe to cut the old pipes back close to the main pipes and cap them or should I just take the time to cut the 'T' out of the main pipes and replace it with a sleeve?

Thanks, Appreciate the help..
 
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Old 10-21-10, 02:06 PM
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For the small piece of baseboard removed (& not to be reinstalled?), the tees should be removed & replaced with straight pipe.

For the kitchen, a "jumper" pipe should be installed between the tees.
 
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Old 10-21-10, 05:36 PM
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got it, thanks again! I appreciate it!
 
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Old 09-12-11, 06:35 PM
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Hi, sorry to bring an old thread back from the dead, but I had another question. As you a probably aware, the northern east coast got quite a bit of rain recently. I got quite a bit of water in my basement, and as hard as I tried to avoid it, it got up high enough to creep into the boiler. It rose maybe 2 inches up above the cement pad my boiler is sitting on. as soon as it got up, I shut the boiler down so it would not run.

Anyways, it's been 4 days since I pumped all of the water out and I've been letting it dry (taking cold showers) ever since. I tired to turn it on tonight, and it started but it sputtered a bit and puffed out some white smoke. Is there a good chance it's just still damp inside, or could it be worse than that? I can tell you, I tried to turn it on a couple days ago, and it sputtered and shut down after 30-45 seconds. Now, it doesn't shut down... but it still doesn't sound very good while running. I currently have it shut down.

thanks!
Josh
 
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Old 09-13-11, 11:42 AM
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I suspect you got some water in the combustion chamber & possibly the burner motor. I'd start by removing the burner motor & checking for any signs of water getting into it. Generally, if water has gotten into the motor it should be replaced.
You should also pull the burner & inspect the chamber for damage especially with this being a dry base boiler. If any damage is noticed, it's time to call in a pro.
While the burner is out remove the top panel & flue collector. Use a shop vac to suck up loose crud before pulling the baffles. Pull the baffles, brush out the flueways, vent pipe, chimney base & chamber if it is ok. Put things back together, change the nozzle, fuel filter, & pump screen, make sure the electrodes are set properly. Once all of that is done, reinstall the nozzle assembly into the burner, bleed the air, & fire it up. I strongly suggest calling in a local pro to do a combustion analysis & fine tune the burner.

If all of this is a bit more than you think you can handle, make the call.
 
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Old 09-13-11, 05:47 PM
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Thanks much for the advice.

Here's what the combustion chamber is looking like. I assume the cracks are typical... and that I can just vac the soot off the bottom. Do I need to worry about cleaning the top? I did also take the top off and use a flue brush on all of the firetubes.







I'm still working on getting the "shroud" for lack of a better word around the nozzle off so I can inspect all of that. It doesn't appear that water got in the burner, but it does look a little dirty.

Thanks again for everything.
 
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Old 09-14-11, 05:53 AM
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If you have removed the baffles & brushed out the fire tubes you've done well.
To remove the nozzle assembly from the burner body, make sure the power is turned off at the switch or breaker then loosen the swing clip(s) holding down the ignition transformer then flip the transformer back, disconnect the small (3/16") copper line from the side of the burner & remove the knurled nut. DO NOT loosen or remove the screw holding the metal plate on the side of the burner thru which the threaded end of the nozzle assembly passes. The nozzle assembly can then be removed by pushing the threaded end toward the center of the burner body, lifting, & pulling toward you. It should slip right out. The nozzle can then be removed using 5/8 & 3/4" wrenches.
While the burner is out, check the end cone for cracks &/or distortion. Replace if either is noticed.
There doesn't look like there's much debris in the chamber but be very careful when using a vac to clean it out. The chamber is quite fragile & easily damaged.
 
 

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