oil nozzle


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Old 09-28-10, 07:35 AM
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oil nozzle

I have a Beckett oil burner hot water boiler. I've been changing the filter, electrodes and nozzle every year. I can see how a filter has to be changed annually and I can see the electrodes gap wearing open but do I have to change the nozzle every year??? Thanks Joe A
 
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Old 09-28-10, 11:24 AM
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Oil nozzle

I used to replace nozzles every year but in the past dozen years or so stopped doing so. I make sure there's good filtration and replace the filter cartridges faithfully. It hasn't come back to bite me. When I was replacing nozzles yearly I had more call backs for nozzles that passed oil a couple of times then suddenly wouldn't. Not everyone agrees with me though.

After replacing the oil filter I make sure to flush the line and pump by running at least a quart of oil out the nozzle line into a container, then I'm pretty sure no contaminents reach the nozzle.
 

Last edited by heatpro; 09-28-10 at 11:26 AM. Reason: Additional info
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Old 09-28-10, 05:28 PM
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Nozzle

I tend to agree with Heatpro but really good filtration is the key. On the other hand, nozzles are cheap & manufacturers claim they actually wear.(???) I certainly don't change electrodes every year, just clean 'em up & adjust them. A large portion of the equipment I work on regularly is 15-20 (or more) years old & still has the original electrodes. The "new" style primary controls drop out the spark after flame is proven thus dramatically reducing electrode wear. Other advantages are a reduction in electrical useage & generally longer transformer life.
 
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Old 09-28-10, 06:51 PM
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You mean on some old oil burners, that they kept sparking the electrode while the burner was going?
 
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Old 09-28-10, 07:01 PM
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Originally Posted by ecman51`
You mean on some old oil burners, that they kept sparking the electrode while the burner was going?
EC, This is a classic case of "what's old is new again". Many of the old burners with stack controls dropped out the ignition once flame was proven.
Most of the next generation of primary controls, the ones with cad cells, kept the ignition on the whole time there was a call from the thermostat or aquastat.
Now we are back to dropping out the spark once flame is proven.
BTW: Riello's "ignition on" time is less than a second.
 
 

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