Kind of stupid furnace filter ?

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  #1  
Old 12-15-00, 07:59 PM
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When I install my gas furnace filter - which way is the ARROW on filter supposed to fase toward the furnace or the vent? And why, the throwaways look the same on both sides.

thanks, JQ
 
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  #2  
Old 12-15-00, 09:03 PM
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Hi:JosephQ

Excellent question!

The filter arrow should face the heater.

On a vertical furnace <the type often found in a hall closet> the air flow is upwards towards the burners. Therefore, the filter arrow should face up towards the burners.

On a horizontal furnace <the type often found suspended in an attic> the filter arrow must face the burners.

The reason there is an arrow, is because the wire mesh found on one side is there to prevent the filter material from being sucked into the motor.

Some filters have wire loops or mesh on both sides. Often these types can be installed either way. These filters aren't often found any more, since manufacturers have become very cost concerned <read cheap> and stop using wire on one side.

If you have a filter with some type of wire on only one side of it, then that side must face the heater. The arrow, therefore, indicates the direction of the air flow.

Hope this reply answers your excellent question. Thanks for asking.
 
  #3  
Old 12-16-00, 05:29 AM
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I think this would also be an excellent thread to discuss what kind of filters to use. Is it better to use the filters that filter out one gazillion trillion particles from the air or, the cheaper filters that let air pass through more easily? I've been told that the high filtration filters make the furnace work much harder (which would result in what damage?) Therfore, the recommendations I've had (from several sources) is to use the cheap filters so the furnace doesn't work so hard. Any truth to this?
 
  #4  
Old 12-16-00, 06:42 AM
fjrachel
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I do not believe high filtration filters make the system work harder. They just need to be changed more often. I use pleated high filtration filters, mainly for the a/c. I've pulled and cleaned to many evaporator coils and know that the cheap throw aways allow too many large particles to pass that won't pass through the evaporator coil. Especially animal/human hair, clothing lint, etc. A very dirty air filter will in fact cause your blower to slow down and not produce as much air. Check your amp draw with a clogged filter as to clean and you'll find that it will go down with the clogged filter. The motor will only work as hard as you let it. Arrow always faces towards the blower, no matter what style furnace/AHU.
 
  #5  
Old 12-16-00, 07:08 AM
pon1
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I totally agree with you fjrachel. I use pleated high filtration filters as well (changing them very frequently because, as you said, they clog very quickly). The dust level in the house is greatly improved with these filters. I've had two separate technicians tell me not to use these filters because they make the furnace work harder. Logically, this didn't make sence to me but, I'm no heating & cooling specialist. I wonder if others agree with us?
 
  #6  
Old 12-16-00, 08:05 AM
fjrachel
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Most of the service techs I know recomend pleated filters and changing frequently. The techs who gave you that 'work harder' game are probably very new to the business or have not had any real formal training. Logic and common sense are your allys. Manufacturers would not make pleated if they hurt the systems. Remember, they are engineered to remove dirt and dust that is always in the system.
 
  #7  
Old 12-16-00, 10:21 AM
pon1
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Yeah. I agree 100%! In fact, the guy that was out yesterday, looking at my humidifier, noticed that I had an old (dirty) high filtration filter laying next to the furnace and said "Don't use those filters. They'll burn out the ignitor quicker because they create higher temps in the furnace." I said "OK, Thanks." Basically, I just wanted him to fix the humidifier and, didn't feel like getting into a debate about filters. Next time he comes out (to install my new humidistat) I'm going to ask more in-depth questions about his filtration logic.
 
  #8  
Old 12-16-00, 11:44 AM
fjrachel
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Sounds like an excuse used to cover up some bad tech work. I've heard many, many illogical reasons why things break down. I'm sorry to say, that techs like that give my business a bad name. A furnace in good working order will never burn out an ignitor. They are engineered to withstand any amount of heat a furnace can generate over and above normal operation temperatures.
As per your humidifier, I believe it was a bad install.
 
  #9  
Old 12-16-00, 12:38 PM
pon1
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I'm glad I found someone (who knows what they are talking about) that agrees with me! You are the man!
 
  #10  
Old 12-16-00, 03:08 PM
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How often is often

Thanks for the answers. So how often is good for filter changing? Once a month in the winter season? I swithced to the pleated filters & did notice less dust settling on items.

JQ
 
  #11  
Old 12-16-00, 04:58 PM
fjrachel
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With pleated filters once a month all year long if you have central a/c. Otherwise just during the months the furnace is running.
 
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