Carrier Weathermaker 9200 / where is the gas smell coming from


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Old 11-16-10, 02:49 PM
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Carrier Weathermaker 9200 / where is the gas smell coming from

we have checked all connections and there are no gas leaks coming into the furnace, yet occasionally there is the slightest smell of gas coming from the furnace closet. where can the gas smell be coming from?
 
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Old 11-16-10, 03:39 PM
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Almost anywhere.


If you have natural gas, call your utility. Usually they will send someone out at no charge to inspect for leaks.
 
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Old 11-17-10, 05:27 PM
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I also recommend calling the utility. Just ask them. I've called for outside leaks but not for anything indoor.
I wonder if there is a small amount of gas when the burner first ignites, and that gas is not getting burned?
 
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Old 11-18-10, 09:58 PM
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thanks for your replies blue3 and SeattlePioneer. PSE takes responsibility for the gas line up to the meter. anything after that is my responsibility, so they will not check the inside connections at no cost. we have checked all inside connections and they show no evidence of leaking gas.
we wondered if the gas was left over from the ignition process, either from start up or shut down, as you suggest. because the furnace is in an inside closet behind closed doors the small amount of gas might be more noticeable than a furnace in a garage where the gas would dissipate.
 
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Old 11-18-10, 11:07 PM
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I used to be a serviceman for Washington Natural Gas and Puget Sound Energy. That's sure a change in policy since I worked for them prior to 2000.

The answer is you have a leak someplace. Residual amounts of gas aren't going to be noticeable.

If you are soaping out fittings, I'd use a 1:1 mixture of water and dish washing detergent. Use a paintbrush to soap out the fitting or a spray bottle.

Spray ample soapy solution on the fittings and examine them closely with a flashlight and mirror for several minutes. The odds are you are looking at a very small leak that can be hard to identify.

Unfortunately, you can also have a dangerous leak with the same symptoms. The probability of that is low, but it's there.
 
 

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