New FHA Oil Furnace Questions


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Old 03-03-11, 02:29 AM
L
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New FHA Oil Furnace Questions

My 30 year old FHA Oil Furnace finally went belly up. May she rest in peace.
So now i have quotes from 2 friends in the business.
Knowing that im looking for the best bang for my buck (who isnt) one came up with a York High Boy at around $1,100 (unsure of model at this point) and the other an American Standard Model: THV1M087A936SA at $1,500
Both are rated at around 110,000 BTU.

My failing furnace is rated at 90,000 BTU. Specs Below.
International Furnace # M840592
Model: HO-95H
Max Input: .85 Gallons Pr/Hr
Nozzle: .85-80B
Tested at .20 static pressure
Serial: 4493D

Furnace Dimensions: 33"D x 54"H x 23W"
Supply Plenum Dimensions: 19 1/2" x 20"
Floor Return

House Measurements
House Sq Ft. = 825 (2 Floors 25' x 33')
Proposed Addition Sq. Ft. = 150 (2 floors 10' x 15' 5")

Question 1: The increase in BTU's is due to the proposed addition that may or may not happen.
Is there any real concern with just running the new furnace blower at a lower RPM and adjusting nozzle size to run at the 90,000 BTU?

Question 2: Is the American Standard worth the extra $400 over the York? I dont believe the York is a premium quality model (not at $1,100).

Question 3: What else other than efficiency ratings, Burner selection (both have Becketts), warranty's, and Heat Exchanger construction should i be looking at.

They have access to other brands if York or American Standard are not 2 of the better brands out there. Money is an issue, but id rather pay a little more now, than deal with issues later.
 
  #2  
Old 03-03-11, 10:45 AM
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Unless you live in a very cold climate & have little to no insulation, your existing furnace is way oversized let alone going bigger. You really need to do a heat loss calculation called a Manual J. This will tell you how much heat you need. One I've used & found to be good is from www.hvaccomputer.com. It costs about $50 but could be the best money you spend on the project.
Personally I'm not at all impressed with York or American Std. oil fired equipment. Thermo Pride is the premier name in oil fired furnaces. I routinely work on them 20 & 30 years old.
 
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Old 03-03-11, 05:26 PM
L
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Thanks Grady,
I think my math was off. Total Sq. Footage should have read 1,950.
Can i calculate total Sq. footage by just measuring the length and width of the 2 floors and proposed addition, calculate sq. ft. and then total those figures up?
 
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Old 03-03-11, 07:31 PM
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If each floor is 25x33, each floor would be 825 sq. ft. (2 floors @ 825ea. would be 1650 sq. ft. total). Square footage alone is meaningless.
I know this is an exageration but to explain my point:
House #1: 2000 sq.ft. built to current Energy Star standards
House #2: 1000 sq.ft. built 75 years ago with no insulation, drafty windows & doors, etc.
I will guarantee it will take more heat to make house 2 comfortable than house 1. This is a large part of what Manual J takes into account.
 
 

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