Payne furnace shuts off/turns burner off

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Old 10-28-11, 07:43 AM
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Payne furnace shuts off/turns burner off

OK< I have about 10 yo Payne furnace.
Watched it this morning.

Inducer works, ignitor(replaced with nitride 10 days ago) lightens up, gas ignites and dies right away. Gas ignites twice, for maybe 2-3 seconds, and cuts off, then blower turns on. Red light flashes 3 long 4 short, which I am assuming code 34.

This furnace been giving me grief for over a year. I already had flame sensor cleaned. Cleaned it again same time had ignitor replaced. OEM ignitor works, but I replaced it as precaution. Since replacement, furnace worked fine until tonight.

Flame sensor is not available in stores and needs to be ordered.


Furnace is overall very loud, also, it's mounted right behind our master bedroom wall and plain won't let me sleep.

I am set on replacing it, but question is - while I am working on replacement, is there anything I can do to get it going for a day or 2? It's not that cold, but was 34 yesterday morning, so it's getting there. Of course, it's Friday...

Also, what is the quiet brand? I am a very light sleeper. Been sleeping in guest room for last 2 weeks because furnace wakes me up..
 
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Old 10-28-11, 09:17 AM
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The Carrier 3-4 diagnostic code indicates that the furnace isn't detecting that the burners have lit, and therefore shuts off the burners.

Cleaning the flame sensor is the most common cause of that problem, but cleaning the flame sensor hasn't solved the problem for you.

Check to be sure the wire from the flame sensor is continuous back to the circuit board.

Aside from that, the most likely cause of the problem is a circuit board that is defective and needs to be replaced.

There are ways of verifying that as the problem if you have a good quality multimeter that reads DC current down to 1 microamp --- 1 billionth of an amp.


There are some very quiet furnaces out there these days.
 
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Old 10-28-11, 11:05 AM
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thank you.
well, cleaning it fixed it for almost a year, now it started acting up again.
I'll take short day today and go look at it one more time. Problem is, no one has those flame sensors locally. It's always an order, hence - several days without heat.
It's sure better than forking $3000 for a quiet furnace.
Any ways to rig it so that circuit board thinks flame is on? short it? it's this sensor

Flame Sensor replaces Carrier Bryant Payne LH680014 on eBay!
 
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Old 10-28-11, 12:05 PM
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The most common cause of the symptom you have is a dirty flame sensor. Cleaning the flame sensor solves the problem.

But if you have a bad circuit board, you can clean or replace the flame sensor all you want and it wont help.

No, bypassing this critical safety system is not an option.
 
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Old 10-28-11, 12:20 PM
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guess I'll rush order sensor. 20 bucks ebay. Maybe I'll go back home and check on it and it's simple loose wire. There's always hope. Sensor looks awfully primitive to go bad.
 
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Old 10-28-11, 12:34 PM
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The flame sensor is just a hunk of metal sticking into the flames. What's elegant is the physics of the way it works. You can actually connect the wire from the flame sensor to a screwdriver and put the screwdriver in the flames to check for a dirty flame sensor.

A flame will rectify an AC voltage into a DC voltage and current. So the circuit board provides an AC voltage to the flame sensor through the wire and looks to see if a small DC current flows along the wire, which would prove that the burners are lit.

If the AC voltage isn't present when it should be, the circuit board is bad. Or if the DC current of 4-5 microamps is present when the burners are lit and the circuit board still shuts off the burners then the circuit board is bad.

Good diagnostic procedure is to check for the AC voltage and DC microamps before replacing the circuit board.
 
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Old 10-28-11, 12:56 PM
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that's too headed for me. I am mechanical guy, not quite that good with electronics.
AC voltage as in between the single wire on sensor and metal anywhere on the furnace? it's single wire deal. Looks like a DC device with negative at the mounting bracket to me.
 
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Old 10-28-11, 05:57 PM
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well, just in case. I "fixed" it. Re-installed old OEM ignitor. I had it replaced with nitride one. Also, took flame sensor out and bent it a little bit more towards burner.

But it's irrelvant. Found that heat exchanger is cracked all over. Replacing furnace monday. Don't see point in throwing repair $$ at 1 yo furnace. Will go for Goodman 95% 2 stage unit.
 
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