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Detereorating firebrick inside combustion chamber of Iron f ireman oil furnace

Detereorating firebrick inside combustion chamber of Iron f ireman oil furnace

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  #1  
Old 11-04-11, 09:40 PM
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Detereorating firebrick inside combustion chamber of Iron f ireman oil furnace

Hello, I have an older style Iron fireman vortex burner (fires from the bottom instead of the side)
The firebrick at the base of the chamber is worn and falling apart (crumbing horribly and causing problems do to pieces interfering with electrodes)
I can't seem to find anything to replace these fire bricks as they are only approx 1/2 in thick with winged edges and custom to the furnace I think....

Would acquiring some sort of refractory 2500/2700* cement and patching over the face of the brick work to calm the issue?

The image shows one of the large splits through the middle of the firebrick and the exposed housing...
 
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  #2  
Old 11-05-11, 09:33 AM
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Just stuffing some Kaowool rope into the crack would probably be sufficient. You could use either a castable refractory or plastic refractory for a more permanent fix IF you have decent access.

A well-stocked fireplace shop might have the refractory cements or else look in the Yellow pages for "refractories" in the nearest big city.
 
  #3  
Old 11-05-11, 05:15 PM
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Iron Fireman?

I didn't know there were still any in existance (residentially), let alone in service. That piece of equipment has to be at least 60 years old. Give it a graceful retirement.1949 IRON FIREMAN oil heating Vortex Flame Furnace AD | eBay
 
  #4  
Old 11-05-11, 08:40 PM
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Unfortunately my budget right now won't let me replace it. I plan to soon given the age and signs of rust on the heat exchanger... I just need to get it through this winter for now at least...
I have a viewport (6"-7" hole) access... Would that be enough to repair or (recast?) the brick.
 
  #5  
Old 11-06-11, 04:47 PM
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I seriously doubt refractory cement will stick unless you can clean the surfaces with a wire brush. It is possible, unlikely but possible, you could get a "wet pack" fiber combustion chamber for that piece of equipment. Lynn Manufacturing is the largest manufacturer of replacement chambers & might be able to help you out. Here's a link to some of their stuff including a phone number. http://www.lynnmfg.com/READREF-%20110111.pdf
 
  #6  
Old 11-07-11, 02:57 AM
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That wetpack material sounds awesome when I read about it.
One concern though is will it handle being directly against the flame? And I'm wondering if What has caused this is the flame being too close to the brick... Or just the age of it, as there may be a root problem.

How close should the flame be getting to this brick? I'm wondering if perhaps the last time it was services they opened the blower vents too much.
 
  #7  
Old 11-07-11, 05:10 PM
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The wet pack will indeed handle any temperatures that Iron Fireman can produce, and then some. In modern flame retention burners the flame should not hit the chamber, not sure about older burners but would presume the same would be true.
 
  #8  
Old 11-08-11, 09:59 AM
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Would closing the burner vents a bit to lessen flame intensity cause any harm? It appears that the flame is hitting the housing, but that may be due to a draft caused from having the view port flap open.
Would the brick be more charred if it was?
 

Last edited by kiyolaka; 11-08-11 at 11:52 AM.
  #9  
Old 11-08-11, 01:34 PM
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Without being able to see the flame or do a smoke test, I'd simply be guessing about the flame.
 
  #10  
Old 11-08-11, 04:19 PM
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I'd happily capture a video and post it on YouTube if you'd be willing to view it. Thank you very much for your insight so far.
 
  #11  
Old 11-08-11, 06:06 PM
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Don't know how much I'll be able to tell, but sure, I'll be glad to take a look. Just provide a link.
 
  #12  
Old 11-08-11, 07:10 PM
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furnace.wmv - YouTube
sorry for my poor steadiness.. First time I've filmed anything.
also I should note that the nozzle is a .75 GPH 80* A (Hollow?) nozzle.
 
  #13  
Old 11-09-11, 05:21 PM
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Other than the condition of the firebrick, the biggest thing I saw was a lopsided flame. The flame seemed to be much heavier on the right side than the left. This could be due to any number of things but the most common are a partially fouled nozzle & the burner not sitting "square" to the chamber. Otherwise the flame didn't look too bad for a non flame retention burner.
 
  #14  
Old 11-10-11, 10:58 AM
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Thanks for looking!
I had noticed that but had written that o having the port open, but hopefully when I replace the pump screen and nozzle(2 years old) that will clear up.
 
  #15  
Old 11-14-11, 08:53 PM
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Do you think given the condition of the brick I could use a caulking gun and some refractory cement to fill the gaps temporarily?

after heavy thought I'm just thinking of limping this thing along another 2 years while I save for a new furnace. I researched the wet pack but due to the flame and how it's behaving it'd possibly prematurely fail. Given that I'm a novice in reguards to stoves/furnaces I'm mostly afraid of exaggerating the problem or rendering the furnace useless. I've called around some residential hvac repair companies but they all seem reluctant to do any sort of repair of this nature on a furnace this old, or the bill would a good portion of the cost of a new one.
 
  #16  
Old 11-15-11, 04:20 PM
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The caulking gun with furnace cement is worth a try. You have nothing to loose.
 
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