Determinging how full my propane tank is

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Old 01-03-12, 06:45 PM
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Determinging how full my propane tank is

I see alot of gauges on sale at Amazon but I am betting that is not the right way. A bathroom scale seemed like a good idea, until I crushed it lol.

Thoughts?

Thanks
 
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Old 01-03-12, 08:45 PM
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How big of a tank are you talking about?
 
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Old 01-05-12, 05:27 PM
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100 lb. tank.......................................................
 
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Old 01-05-12, 06:33 PM
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Other than observing the dew line on the tank which will only form under the right atmospheric conditions & having a good draw on the tank, a gauge, platform scales, or rocking the tank to estimate it's contents, you are pretty much out of luck. All the external "gauges" I've seen are for tanks no larger than 40#. Most are for 20# "BBQ" tanks.
 
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Old 01-05-12, 06:36 PM
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Thanks Grady...I can just live with it and configure my thermostat to run the Strips until I can get over to the Propane shop. The tank is for an indoor ventless space heater which is turning out to be far more efficient than the strips for AUX purposes.
 
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Old 01-05-12, 07:32 PM
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Suit yourself but I STONGLY discourage the use of unvented fuel burning heaters in a home.
 
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Old 01-05-12, 07:50 PM
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I'm with Grady. Unvented equipment is, oh, 1000 times as likely to cause death or serious injury fro carbon monoxide poisoning as vented equipment. And it can cause a variety of damage from excessive humidity in dwelling spaces.

Very commonly, the operating manuals for unvented equipment carry specific warnings AGAINST using it as heating equipment. Often operating manuals specify such equipment be used only for so many minutes per hour, or require that a window be opened to provide ventilation.

Users frequently ignore such warnings and directions, which is why they are risky.

IF EVERY person using such equipment read, understood and followed ALL the directions and warnings contained in the operating manual, no doubt those people could operate the equipment safely. But I have never met a person who did.
 
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Old 01-06-12, 05:41 AM
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I have read the manual completely and appreciate your concerns. Electric bill was $164 bucks lower this month than at the same time last year and that includes the utility company rate hike. It is dry as heck where I live in the winter so the extra carbon dioxide is useful. Even then, it rarely needs to cycle. This is simply supplemental heat not something that is used often.
 
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Old 01-06-12, 09:49 AM
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propane

In cool to cold weather, you can pour hot water down the side of the tank. Immediately feel the temp of the tank where you poured the water. It will be warm where the tank is empty and cool from the propane level down to the bottom. Steve
 
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Old 01-06-12, 10:41 AM
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That's a cool trick thanks for the info.
 
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Old 01-09-12, 07:04 AM
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It is dry as heck where I live in the winter so the extra carbon dioxide is useful.
Carbon dioxide is not the problem, CARBON MONOXIDE is the problem with unvented appliances no matter how often you use them! Colorless, odorless, unnoticeable with out a CO detector, and I'm not talking about a CO alarm that is found in many homes. There is a big difference. Read more here (page 7 especially) or here.
 
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