Gas Well and Furnace Issues


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Old 02-09-12, 01:17 PM
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Gas Well and Furnace Issues

Here is my problem.
I received a natural gas from a well that is NOT on my property. The well is about 1/2 mile away on the neighbor's property. I am the third and last one in line to get gas from the well. Every time the weather changes here, which has been quite often, the gas to my house shuts off and I come home to or wake up to a cold house. I'm forced to trudge outside and drain the gasline and reset the safety valve and then restart both furnaces and the water heater. I'm doing this at least 2 times a week. After speaking to the gas company, I'm told that the issue is low pressure in the line to my house due to condensation building up at the site where the line runs from the well, meaning it's my problem. One guy suggested putting a heater there to keep the condensation from building up.

Anyone know anything about this? How can I keep my furnace from shutting off everytime it gets cold?
 
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Old 02-09-12, 01:34 PM
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I used to deal with this problem fairly often when I was a pipe fitter for a natural gas utility.

Presumably you have a low pressure gas line, nominally about 7" water column pressure or so.


What we did was to install a "drip" line at a low point that could be pumped out when water accumulated.

In particularly chronic situations, we used a section of steel pipe 14" in diameter or so, with plates welded to each end to seal the pipe, making a gas tight cylinder.

We buried the cylinder and connected that to a low point in the service near the gas meter. Water on the service would then drip into this reservoir and accumulate. An access point was welded on so that the accumulated water could be pumped out from time to time.

The steel needed to be protected against corrosion.

Not a DIY project.


What kind of company manages the well and the gas service? If they have a responsibility to service and maintain the gas line, they ought to have a responsibility to provide reliable service by dealing with the water issue, I would suppose.


The kind of project I described is a pretty simple way for a skilled person to deal with the issue, but it still needs to be pumped out before it fills up to avoid interrupting the service.



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Old 02-09-12, 01:47 PM
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What kind of safety valve? There are several different varieties possible.


Also. water accumulates in the low point of the line, which could be anyplace along the 1/2 mile length.

Check with the other users --- do they have this kind of problem as well? If so, the issue would be upstream from those locations.

The low point on your portion of the line might not be at the gas meter. It might be necessary to locate where the low point(s) are before crafting a remedy.

Also, just resetting the service as you've done really doesn't address the water logged nature of the service. At a minimum, the utility should come out, shut off one or more water logged portions of the pipe and blow out accunulated water with compressed air, then reconnect the service.

At that point you should be operating with a dry pipe that will minimize how often this problem occurs. What you are doing doesn't eliminate water from the water logged portion of the line.

It gets back to the issue of having the utility (or whoever is maintaining these lines) doing their job properly to minimize problems.
 
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Old 02-10-12, 08:33 AM
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I understand what you're saying. (for the most part).
What the gas well company is telling is that once the gas comes out of the ground and hits the feeder pipe, it now is my responsibility. Once the gas is there, it goes to two other houses right next to the well, then flows the 1/2 mile to my house.
When the pressure gets too low, there is a little stem on the valve that I have to manually pull out to get the gas flowing again.

When I did have the technician out, he said that a small heater right where the pipe becomes mine, would alleviate the problem. Do you have any clue what I should be looking for? He described it to me, but for the life of me I can't remember what I should be shopping for.
 
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Old 02-10-12, 09:10 AM
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On the valve you reset to turn on the gas you should find the manufacturer and model of the part. Post that.


Do you know what kind of material and the size of the pipe used to move the gas?

Who maintains and inspects the gas line for safe operation and does maintenance on it?
 
 

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