Honeywell Primary Control compatibility


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Old 02-14-12, 01:06 PM
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Honeywell Primary Control compatibility

Hello,

I have a rather old Beckett RWB oil burner installed in my forced hot air furnace. Yesterday morning the 43 year old primary controller finally died. I was able to diagnose the problem with the help of this wonderful site.

My question is, the primary controller that was installed was a Honeywell R8184B 1188. Being a third generation hoarder, I happen to have a Honeywell R7184B controller laying around. Is it possible for me to use this controller instead, or do I have to go buy a new one? I understand the 7184B is intended to be used with an oil valve, but could I just not hook those wires up?

Thank you.
 
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Old 02-14-12, 07:11 PM
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I believe the 7184B would work. The question in my mind is when the ignition will come on. If you wire the blue wire to the ignition transformer & you don't get prompt ignition, connect the transformer & motor to orange just like your old primary. Be sure to put wire nuts on the unused wire(s). On the 7184, black is power in, white is neutral, orange goes to the motor, blue to the ignition transformer, & violet to the oil solenoid.
 
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Old 02-14-12, 08:20 PM
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also check the primary function of the control by taking one yellow wire off a F terminal while running and make sure it goes off on reset.if not get new control.
 
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Old 02-15-12, 09:28 AM
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After reading a few older threads specifically mentioning the 7184B, I realized the control would lock out if it sees flame before the 15s oil delay has passed.

Fortunately, I had a spare pump with valve laying around as well, so I got that installed last night. Now I just have to run the extra wires to the control box. The old unit had only two wires running from the back of the box to the burner. The new one will need 4 or 5.

Thanks for your help, I'll post back once it's running.
 
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Old 02-15-12, 02:59 PM
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Success!

Everything is running as it should, the house is toasty warm now. The flame even looks healthier than it did with the old setup, perhaps the old pump was on its way out.

One minor question- When the pump is running, I hear a minor squeaking type noise. It sounds as if a very tiny leak were pulling air into the lines. There is no oil leaking out, whether the pump is running or not. The burner also seems to be running fine.

Is there any way to test for an air leak, or could the sound be something else entirely?
 
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Old 02-15-12, 06:02 PM
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If you have a 2 pipe system, it might be an air leak or something else.
If you only have one line from the tank to the pump, it isn't an air leak. If there were an air leak on a one pipe, the pump would become airbound.

I forgot about the lockout if flame was sensed too soon. I never carried 'B' primaries on the truck. Just the basic 'A' for most applications & a 'U' for anything else.
 
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Old 02-18-12, 09:36 AM
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Well I believe I learned about the lockout from one of your older posts, so you still get credit for saving me from that headache.

Burner was locked out again this morning. After doing more searching on this forum (mostly posts by you, Grady, or NJTrooper) I realized I had to put the bypass plug into my new pump, since it was off a single line system.

I also think my air leak may have been due to not using any thread sealant on the fittings on the pump. I've corrected that as well now. Letting the sealant cure for a few hours, then I'll stick it all back together again and hope for the best.

With the money I'm saving on reusing parts and not calling in service, I might have to buy two Tigerloops to further improve this system. I really wish they would just run Natural Gas down my street though.
 
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Old 02-18-12, 10:32 AM
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I would suggest checking the pump pressure. Many of the systems today run at 140# where yours is likely a 100#. If you are supplying it at 140#, you are inputting about 20% more fuel than you should.
 
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Old 02-18-12, 11:15 AM
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I will see what sort of tool I need to check the pressure.

After putting everything back together today, it won't light. The pump is definitely getting fuel, as verified by the bleeder valve. I'm confused because it lit up fine and worked for a day or so after I originally swapped in the pump.

Fortunately it is a warm day, so i'm going to take a break and go work on my car, while I roll the problem around in my head a bit.
 
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Old 02-18-12, 06:11 PM
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I use a 300# gauge with an adaptor to 3/16" flare & screw it onto the nozzle line.
 
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Old 02-21-12, 03:04 PM
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Well I got it running today.

After seeing the general lack of maintenance on this furnace, I decided to pull out the ignitor/nozzle assembly. The ignitors were completely shot. I had a spare set, so I just went and bought a correct nozzle and threw it all back together. Fired up perfectly on the first try.

My theory is either I knocked loose some 'crud' while I was working on it, or there was some buildup in the spare pump due to storage, and remnants of old fuel in the used pump. This would explain why it worked for a little while, then died as the nozzle became clogged.

Thanks again for all your help. I would not have tried this on my own without this forum's archives to search through.
 
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Old 02-21-12, 04:44 PM
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If you connect the blue wire of the primary to one side of the ignition transformer you will find the electrodes will last MUCH longer. Presuming the old 8184 to have had only three wires (black, white, & orange), the ignition transformer stayed on the whole time the buner was running. This long arc time wears out electrodes rapidly. With the new primary & the blue connected to the ignition, the spark will drop out after the safety time. This saves electrodes, the ignition transformer, electricity, & the most important thing, MONEY.
 
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Old 02-25-12, 03:45 PM
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Yes I definitely hooked up the transformer to the interrupted circuit, for the reasons you mentioned. Now I'm thinking about going to a smaller flow rate nozzle to cut down of fuel usage....I really feel our system is way oversized for our little house, even with the minimal insulation we're stuck with.

Now that I've learned all this useful knowledge, I guess i'm forced to address the horrible oil-fired hot water heater as well. As interesting as all of this stuff is, I still hate oil heat.
 
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Old 02-25-12, 04:31 PM
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You really shouldn't downfire the furnace more than about 10%. To do so risks low stack temeratures resulting in condensation with potential damage to the chimney & possibly the heat exchanger of the furnace. It is imperative combustion tests be done when changing the firing rate. The vast majority of heating systems are oversized, many by 100% or more.
I can't say a lot bad about oil heat since it has helped feed my family for as long as I can remember but if I had natural gas available, that's what I'd be burning.
 
 

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