oil furnace replacement


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Old 06-16-12, 06:23 PM
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oil furnace replacement

hi

i live in a house built in 1933 we have steam heat. the oil furnace we had broke, it was from about 1960. we have 2 floors, 7 rooms. we have an estimate from a contractor for $6900 for a weil mclain oil boiler SGO-4 and a becket g04 flame retentention burner. removing the broken furnace is included in the price. is $6900 a good price for the furnace and burner? also should we consider a gas furnace instead of an oil furnace?
 
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Old 06-17-12, 08:39 AM
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In a 1933 house, your top priority should be reducing heat loss rather than upgrading heating equipment.

If you don't know where to start, consider getting a professional energy audit done, which involves a blower door test, inspection of insulation/windows and possibly thermal imaging.

also should we consider a gas furnace instead of an oil furnace?

Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/ne...#ixzz1y46teFCp
Yes - gas is a much cheaper. (requires less maintenance too)

Even gas steam boilers aren't very efficient; ask about converting to hot water and installing a condensing (90% efficient) boiler.
 
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Old 06-18-12, 05:06 AM
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Muggle,
The OP stated the oil boiler is broken, so regardless of heat loss, it's has to be addressed.

To the OP,
Natural gas tends to be much cheaper then oil and generally cleaner. I would also highly recommend you (and/or the contractor) inspect all your pipes through the house and evaluate their condition. It may be time to consider replacing the piping if they are starting to look rough and or leaking.
I have a 1937 home (slightly larger) with a hot water oil boiler. Although my boiler is newer (90's) some of my pipework is really old. I have noticed a few spots where the solder has started to leak. If time/money was in the cards for me, I would replace all the copper with PEX and then sell off the scrap copper to recover a good part of the material costs. I know PEX can be used for hot water systems, but I do not know if you can use it or similar for steam. Could be worth looking into. You would be suprised at how much it'll cost with selling off the old metal.
 
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Old 06-18-12, 09:59 AM
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My point was that the efficiency of the boiler is far less important than the overall efficiency of the building envelop.

If planned upgrades are done after the boiler is replaced, it will be significantly over sized.
 
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Old 06-18-12, 07:32 PM
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oil furnace replacement

Thank you for the answers Muggle, Northern Mike.
 
 

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