Blower always on - "Dependable" 92


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Old 07-15-12, 05:19 PM
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Blower always on - "Dependable" 92

Model: Goodman GMNT060-3 circa 1999

Greets all-

My furnace (with A/C) blower is always on. I just moved into this old house in the winter. It had sat vacant for 2 years, if it matters. Blower was stuck hard and I physically broke it loose and then it worked fine. Propane heat worked fine, blower came on and went off afterwards. Now when cooling season started, or possibly just before, I have this blower problem. Blower never shuts off even when I turn the thermostat completely off.

On the board I have disconnected all the thermostat wires (W,R,G) and the blower still runs, ruling out thermostat wiring shorts. I was hoping to find a standalone blower relay in here but I don't see one. Just some relays on the board which I could probably replace if I can find them.

But here's the real question:

The status light is rapidly blinking, and the sticker on the panel says this could indicate "Reverse Twinning". I thought I was well-versed in electrical matters but I've never heard of "twinning". The sticker recommends reversing the leads on the secondary side of the transformer (or the primary, in another paragraph) and I'm not about to do either. The dead panel switch is wired to the hot as it should be. Plus the thing worked fine before. And this is AC so c'mon.

Can this "twinning" stuff really cause the blower to stay on? I do see a lead on the board labeled "TWIN" which is empty. For all I know, the furnace was blinking complaining about this polarity issue for years and the stuff still worked fine until something else broke.

My plan is to try to locate a new board for it. Failing that, I will find some new relays and solder them in. Seems I need a "Form A" and/or a "Form C" from Potter & Brumfield with the appropriate specs.

Any other ideas?
 
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Old 07-15-12, 05:49 PM
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Just some addl info:

Terrible coincidence, but after reading this recent thread, some similarities:

After reading that and looking, I have found minor damage in the A/C control wire. I had also overfused my unit to 5A (fuse from the car during an "emergency"). I do smell a capacitor-type smell when closing in an unrelated circuit in the house, but that one stays off for now.

If it's just a short in the A/C control wiring, I should be able to disconnect it in the fall and things will be back to normal? Or is my board likely damaged? I'll have to try it as soon as it's not 95F out here.
 
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Old 07-15-12, 05:54 PM
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Twinning is a silly term in my opinion that means to operate two furnaces with a single thermostat. That is definitely NOT the problem.

Since you have disconnected the thermostat wiring at the furnace that leaves a problem with the control board as the problem. It could be stuck relay or it could be more than that. These boards are not made to be field repaired and doing so negates the UL listing. Making a field repair (rather than replacement) could mean that your insurance company might deny coverage if there was a fire as a result of the repair.

Board replacement is the proper course of action.
 
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Old 07-15-12, 06:44 PM
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Thanks Furd, replacement board ordered. I will post a followup when everything is resolved. I think that other guy's and my fire smell may be more related than I thought. We will see.

Regarding the insurance, negligence is covered. After all, that's what it's for. Depends on the intent.
 
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Old 07-15-12, 07:08 PM
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with limited info on your furnace check to see that the fan control / helix type h.well.. if applies... may have a white button that has been mistakingly pressed in.this causes continous fan on.. pull the white stem out and fan with shut off.. if unit has board tap on the reley for hi speed may be hung up ..
 
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Old 07-15-12, 07:14 PM
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Regarding the insurance, negligence is covered. After all, that's what it's for. Depends on the intent.
Which is why I wrote might. If a furnace professional did the field repair it wouldn't be negligence and they would be responsible for making an incorrect repair that caused the fire. Depending on the loss I suspect that most insurance companies would just pay the claim and not make a thorough enough investigation to determine that it was an improper repair that caused the loss. But some might.
 
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Old 07-15-12, 08:01 PM
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may have a white button that has been mistakingly pressed in.this causes continous fan on
Ah, now I vaguely remember reading something about that weeks ago. Unfortunately for me, nope, nothing like that in this furnace. All I've got is a board, a 24VAC transformer, a big ol' capacitor, and something with a tube that goes to the induced draft motor.

If a furnace professional did the field repair it wouldn't be negligence and they would be responsible for making an incorrect repair that caused the fire.
Now _that's_ negligence! By legal definition.

Anyway my point is if the homeowner honestly _believes_ to be _fixing_ the problem by overfusing the 15A circuit to 20A and a fire results, the claim gets paid. If the neighbors are bodily injured, their claim is definitely paid. (And you wouldn't dispute that last part, I'm sure.)

The insurance company can prove in court that the homeowner was an idiot, but unless they prove criminal intent they are going to pay. I did have an email in to my contact at a State Farm agent just now for confirmation but it bounced. (Downsizing? Wow) I don't have the guts to send it through the main site just for a "what if". Anyone else wants to do so I'm willing to read the response.
 
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Old 07-15-12, 08:05 PM
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Old 07-15-12, 08:37 PM
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Thought about it some more and couldn't resist.

Sent:
Dear State Farm agent-

Am I contractually obligated to use only UL-listed applianaces and devices in my home, or am I allowed to choose what I purchase and use? Will this choice have any effect on a possible claim in the future?

Second question: If I, as a homeowner, legally perform electrical work on my own personal residence (under the laws of the state/county), and that work is later determined to be negligent and the cause of damage, can my claim be rejected?

Thanks!

P.S. The reason I ask: This topic has come up on a home improvement forum and your response, with your permission, will be reposted there. I will redact all names (including Agent's) unless you wish to take advantage of the free advertising!
 
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Old 07-17-12, 12:32 PM
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Kudos to CT Supply out of Omaha; they had my new board here the very next day for just the regular shipping charge. I'm impresssed.

New board did the trick and everything works fine. LED is now solid on indicating no fault. Strange that the old board would flash to indicate reverse polarity when the relay or whatever stuck.

Regarding the insurance issue, I received a reply from an agent. He cautions that homeowners should check with their own agents as all companies may be different. In addition, policies are updated frequently and change all the time. He has asked to remain nameless for that reason, but here is response otherwise:

As a general rule, every claim is investigated on its own merit and each
Insurance company has their own policy language.

There is no requirement in the policy to use only UL-listed appliances and
devices. There are currently no exclusions for losses caused by non-UL listed
appliances and devices.

There are currently no exclusions for losses caused by electrical work
performed by a homeowner that accidentally causes a loss.
So it would seem at this particular company I'm free to do all the questionable work I want as long as the resultant damage is accidental. Your mileage may vary.
 
 

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