Bryant Furnace comparison


  #1  
Old 09-25-12, 12:05 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: ottawa canada
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Bryant Furnace comparison

I would appreciate if anyone can explain the differnet between a Bryant Evolution 90i model 355AAV and a Bryant Evolution 96t Model 986T furnace. They are both 96.6 efficiency. However there is a big difference in price quoted by two different Bryant contractors. Thank you in advance
 
  #2  
Old 09-25-12, 03:45 PM
user 10's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: NA
Posts: 1,829
Received 57 Upvotes on 50 Posts
One is modulating (variable capacity) and the other is two stage. (66% or 100% capacity)

I would go for the two stage myself if properly sized and installed.

Modulating furnaces are probably expensive to repair.
 
  #3  
Old 09-25-12, 04:01 PM
SeattlePioneer's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Seattle, Wa
Posts: 4,469
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
I agree with Muggle.


Actually, I favor single stage 90%+ furnaces these days. Simpler, less expensive and manufacturers have figured out how to build them reliably.
 
  #4  
Old 09-25-12, 04:06 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: ottawa canada
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Bryant Furnace Comparison

Thank you Muggle. Which one is modulating and which is two stage.
I have a 1800 sq ft, 2 stories house. Contractor recommending a 80,000 btu
furnace and a 30,000 btu AC. Thanks again.
 
  #5  
Old 09-25-12, 07:48 PM
user 10's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: NA
Posts: 1,829
Received 57 Upvotes on 50 Posts
The 355AAV is the two stage.

986T is modulating.

The biggest ticket item on both of those furnaces is the ecm blower motor, which costs hundreds of dollars replace if it goes.

Having two stages of heat does significantly improve comfort and reduce noise; modulating takes it a step further but the law of diminishing returns applies...

Modulating furnaces sometimes have a ecm venter motor as well, which is very expensive to replace. (Some of the of the other parts are also more expensive to change)

The ecm blower is great to have (energy savings, low speed continuous fan), but only with a long parts/labour warranty or service plan.

------------------
Some two-stage units have a regular blower motor.
 
  #6  
Old 09-25-12, 07:53 PM
user 10's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: NA
Posts: 1,829
Received 57 Upvotes on 50 Posts
Contractor recommending a 80,000 btu
furnace and a 30,000 btu AC. Thanks again.
Both sound big unless the house isn't well insulated.

A 80 000 BTU high efficiency furnace = 100k conventional or mid efficiency furnace.


A 60 000 BTU high efficiency model = 75k """"""""""""""""""""""""'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''

As for the a/c, 1 ton may do 800-1200 sq ft in ottawa depending on the house.

Oversizing reduces dehumidification; get the smallest a/c which will do the job.

What size is the existing furnace?
 
  #7  
Old 09-26-12, 07:20 AM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: ottawa canada
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Bryant Furnace Comparison

Thank you Muggle and Seattlepioneer for the response.
My current furnace is a 115K mid efficiency Amanda installed 20 years ago when my old furnace was comdemmed in the middle of the winter. The first contactor came in and told me he can install one the next day and I went for it. Not knowing what size I need, I agreed to the installation.
My house is 29 x 31 feet, 2 stories, basement 25% finished, a cold room, all windows are pvc. The old AC was keeprite, 28574 btu, installed by previous owner more than 25 years ago.
The quotes I got recommeded 70-80 K furnace and 2 - 2.5 ton AC.
Looking forward to yours or anyone recommendation......thanks
 
  #8  
Old 09-26-12, 03:14 PM
user 10's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: NA
Posts: 1,829
Received 57 Upvotes on 50 Posts
When was the house built?

Post type of construction if you know it; example...

- 2x4 wall (with or without insulation)
- 2x6 wall
- double brick
- Amount of insulation in attic if you know (inches and material)

If it was built after 1980 or so and has typical window surface area, a 60k 95% eff furnace (replaces 75k conventional/mid) and 2 ton a/c will probably do the job; I would go for a 70k furnace at most.

If not and the house hasn't been upgraded (windows aside), you might need more capacity.

Low-e windows reduce heat gain, so 30k of cooling is probably too much now unless the attic has minimal insulation/ventilation.
 
  #9  
Old 09-26-12, 03:48 PM
hvactechfw's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 5,491
Upvotes: 0
Received 4 Upvotes on 4 Posts
Have a load calculation done to know exactly what your home needs. Anything else is guessing.
 
  #10  
Old 09-26-12, 04:16 PM
user 10's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: NA
Posts: 1,829
Received 57 Upvotes on 50 Posts
Good luck getting a load calc done by a contractor.

Even a load calc can't be truly accurate unless a blower door test is performed and the contractor goes through the trouble of checking for insulation.

...but 80k btu input/77k output is on the high side for a 1800 sq ft house in ottawa unless the walls have no insulation or the house is very leaky; that size can heat 2800-3200+ sq ft home 1980s construction in the OP's climate.
 
  #11  
Old 09-28-12, 06:41 AM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: ottawa canada
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Bryant Furnace Comparison

Thank you. After discussion with my Brant contractor, I have decided to
get a 60K furnace and 2 ton AC.
My contractor also told me that the Evolution 90i 355 AAV is a 2011 model and the 986T is 2012 model? Comments anyone ?
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: