Does this look right?


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Old 10-28-12, 08:04 AM
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Does this look right?

My parents are having trouble with their smoke detector going off. Oil furnace has this vent in the exhaust line. Is it supposed to be there? Is it letting smoke and co2 into the house? The smoke detector system (interconnected) is new. It started going off when the heating season started and we cannot find any smoke or fire.

You can see in one photo I put tin foil over the opening. Not sure if it's a good idea or not. HELP!
 
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Last edited by trance; 10-28-12 at 08:25 AM. Reason: added photos
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Old 10-28-12, 08:25 AM
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Does it look like this? If so, then it should be there. You really need to have a pro come in and check the problem. This is not something you want to screw around with. For your family's safety please call the fire dept, local utility, or a hvac contractor if the smoke detectors are going off and they also detect Carbon Monoxide (CO). If the smoke detectors are going off and they can only detect smoke then you need to call your fire dept upon warning from the detectors.
 
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Old 10-28-12, 08:26 AM
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you added pictures.....get that foil off there now!
 
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Old 10-28-12, 08:27 AM
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thanks, yes that's what it looks like. I will have them get the fire dept over to look. The smoke detectors do not check for co2.
 
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Old 10-28-12, 08:32 AM
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again, just trying to help you be correct when talking about a topic. Carbon monoxide (dangerous) is CO; Carbon Dioxide (normally aboundant in our atmosphere) is co2.
 
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Old 10-28-12, 08:35 AM
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OK, will take the foil off. What is the vent there for? I assume to let air into the vent line?
 
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Old 10-28-12, 08:40 AM
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OK - CO. Thank you again!!!
 
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Old 10-28-12, 08:43 AM
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Barometric dampers are devices used to regulate the draft on oil-fired heating equipment such as furnaces, boilers, or water heaters. The barometric damper or draft regulating device we are discussing here is normally used only on oil-fired heating equipment, not on gas-fired equipment.

During oil burner operation, and also on some gas fired equipment, combustion air moves into the burner are and combustion chamber (as combustion air). As combustion continues (the fuel is mixed with air and burned), a mix of air and combustion gases continues onwards, moving out of the combustion chamber, up through the boiler or furnace heat exchanger, through the flue vent connector ("stack pipe or flue pipe" and on into the chimney where these gases are finally vented outside, usually above the building roof. The force with which this air or combustion gas moves is the "draft" inside of the heating appliance.
Too much draft increases heating appliance operating cost by venting heat out through the chimney instead of transferring the heat into the building where it was wanted. Too much draft can also increase chimney temperatures to an unsafe level.
Too little draft can result in incomplete combustion, soot-clogging of heating equipment (dangerous), and more dangerous heating appliance malfunctions such as oil burner puffbacks and in some cases dangerous production of carbon monoxide gas that leaks into the building (a potentially fatal problem).
So virtually all fossil-fuel-fired heating appliances provide some sort of draft control or draft regulator to keep the draft at required levels both in the combustion chamber and out through the chimney.

Source : Draft Regulators - Barometric Dampers: A Guide to Barometric Dampers on Oil Fired Boilers, Furnaces, Water Heaters: inspection, adjustment, cleaning, troubleshooting
 
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Old 10-28-12, 10:39 AM
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Ummm. I have to disagree with others recommending that the barometric diverter be placed back in operation.

That's an 80% furnace that is in the pictures. It has it's own means of controlling the draft --- an inducer motor.

I would presume that an older furnace needed the barometric diverter, and it was taken out of service when the new furnace was installed.

The current equipment doesn't need a barometric diverter, so taking it out of service was the correct thing to do.
 
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Old 10-28-12, 10:48 AM
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No,

SP you are wrong... There is no inducer motor, it is an oil buring furnace.

http://www.docs.hvacpartners.com/idc.../im-cbm-02.pdf

2.4.4 Draft Regulator
The draft regulator supplied with the furnace must be used
for proper functioning. Installation instructions are included
with the control.
 
 

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