Furnace & Ductwork replacement


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Old 12-03-12, 06:47 AM
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Furnace & Ductwork replacement

I currently have an inoperative forced-air oil furnace - cracked heat chamber and insulated ductwork is coated with oily soot.

I want to replace this furnace with a gas-fired furnace and, likely, the ductwork that was fouled with the oil soot, and I mean REALLY fouled.

My questions are:
* Can the existing oil furnace be dismantled and removed to be replaced with a gas furnace? Of course, the tank would be drained and disconnected.
* Is there a venting system for a gas furnace that doesn't require a flue?
* The ductwork is so fouled with soot that it must be replaced. The existing ductwork is insulated and in the basement. Would it matter to replace the ductwork with non-insulated duct? (really $$$! to replace)

Thanks!
 
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Old 12-03-12, 03:12 PM
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If the basement is heated, metal duct is best; the way the duct system is designed will make or break your system.

Proper sizing is also very important.

---------------
* Can the existing oil furnace be dismantled and removed to be replaced with a gas furnace? Of course, the tank would be drained and disconnected.

Yes.

* Is there a venting system for a gas furnace that doesn't require a flue?

Yes. High efficiency furnaces vent through the wall using pvc pipe. If you have a masonry chimney with a water heater venting through it, you'll have to get a liner installed once the furnace is removed. (or replace the water heater with a power vent or direct vent model.

* The ductwork is so fouled with soot that it must be replaced. The existing ductwork is insulated and in the basement. Would it matter to replace the ductwork with non-insulated duct? (really $$$! to replace)

See above.

Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/ne...#ixzz2E27nM9B6
 
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Old 12-04-12, 06:21 AM
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Thanks for the resonse, Muggle.

The water heater is electric, and I'll probably maintain that, for the present.

The basement is not heated and is unfinished, though I would probably like to install a register (or, two) to heat this space up to help keep it dry.

I wonder what kind of scrap metal would be useful from the existing furnace - that's going to be a joy to dismantle! LOL

Again, thanks for the reply!
 
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Old 12-04-12, 10:00 AM
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If the basement is similar to an older crawlspace -> ventilated, unheated, with insulation in between the floor joists, adding registers and using uninsulated ductwork will dramatically increase your energy consumption.

The best option is to convert the basement into a conditioned space - seal it off, insulate above grade (not below unless your foundation has been water/damp proofed), and get a barrier put down on the floor if it's dirt. A dirt floor is one of the greatest sources of moisture.

Google "crawlspace encapsulation" if you have a dirt floor.
 
 

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