Carrier Heater 58GSC045 - Loud Pop When Lighting


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Old 01-05-13, 08:50 AM
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Carrier Heater 58GSC045 - Loud Pop When Lighting

A few weeks ago, the gas valve was not working. Replaced it with a new one. Fixed that problem, but now, when the valve opens and the pilot lights the burners, there was a loud pop. The flame shoots out to the grill/cover. The left-hand burner was not burning all the way to the back and there was blue flame on the under side. I called a service guy out yesterday. He cleaned the left burner and the orifices. Some dust, but not clogged. The burners are not cracked and are in great condition. We started it a couple of times before he left and it seemed ok. This morning, it popped again. Louder than ever. Could it be that the new valve is putting out too much gas and needs to be adjusted? The new valve says it was factory adjusted @ 3.5 WC, which is the correct value.

Any opinions? Thanks.
 
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Old 01-05-13, 09:37 AM
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I recommend calling your tech back to check the gas pressure, verify crossover alignment and take a good look at that late 1980's heat exchanger.
 
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Old 01-05-13, 02:16 PM
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What you are describing is called "delayed ignition." It occurs when all or part of the burners don't light properly. If the burners don't light, gas accumulates until it finds an ignition source, then BOOM!


The usual cause is burners that are dirty, misaligned or damaged. Often dirt in the carryover ports that carry the flames from burner to burner is the problem.

A skilled person will carefully observe the burner ignition, perhaps several or even many times until the cause of the problem is seen. That also requires some skill since it's easy enough for accumulated gas to come out and burn the repairman --- a burned nose can easily be the result.
 
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Old 01-05-13, 03:42 PM
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What's that smell?
It's just my eyebrows
 
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Old 01-05-13, 05:13 PM
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Thanks for the replies. "Delayed ignition". That's exactly what it is. I have a call in for the guy to come back Monday. I'll report back.
 
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Old 01-08-13, 07:29 AM
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He came back. Re-adjusted the burners (looked at them again for any debris, etc). Took a CO2 reading. That was good. Probed the heat exchanger. That looks good. Checked valve output. That was good. Got up on the roof and checked the exhaust and cap for blockage. He tweaked the burners until he got it light normally. He lit it five times before he left. Fired it up this morning and same problem. It is still taking too long to ignite after the valve opens.
 
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Old 01-08-13, 11:54 AM
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Intermittent problems are the bane of repairman. Still, usually they can be diagnosed and corrected the first time given sufficient skill and persistance by the repairman.

In this case, that means cycling the furnace through the ignition csequence often enough to observe the problem, and to observe the problem occur perhaps several times until you can SEE where the ignition failure is occurring.

Then repairing the defect and cycling the furnace additional times (forty or fifty times might be appropriate) to see if the problem recurs.

Depending on how often the ignition delay occurs, you might need to cycle the furnace on a hundred times before being able to observe the problem.

Another possibility can be to change the burners around so that a likely bad burner is in a different position.

It sounds like he had no problem observing the ignition delay. Did he say what was causing the problem? If he observed the problem, he failed to correct it and to cycle the furnace often enough to reveal that his solution didn't solve the problem.
 
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Old 01-08-13, 03:57 PM
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blue flames rolling under the burner are a sign of a plugged heat exchanger.
 
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Old 01-08-13, 08:05 PM
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I'm on a quest to find a more competent repair guy. Again, thanks for your replies.
 
 

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