Vent Broken off


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Old 03-10-13, 01:53 PM
T
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Vent Broken off

I have a broken gas furnace vent on the outside wall on my house. I have two questions:

1. Is this safe because the pipe does not extend past the outside of the house?

2. What is the best way to repair this? Can I make a sleeve and insert into the pipe and then cement the broken piece onto the other end of the sleeve?

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Tony
 
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Old 03-10-13, 01:57 PM
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Looks to me as if that elbow was never glued on to begin with. Try to push that elbow back on and see if it fits. I suspect there is a reason why it wasn't glued (if I am correct about that) but I don't know what that reason may be.
 
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Old 03-10-13, 10:19 PM
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It was broken off by some kids hitting it with a metal pole.
 
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Old 03-10-13, 10:46 PM
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I didn't ask HOW it was broken, I stated it might not be "broken" at all, just knocked off the pipe in the wall. IF the piece in the wall has a relatively squared off end AND the elbow has no broken plastic in the end opposite the end with the stub pipe then it probably can be just pushed back onto the pipe in the wall.

Plastic pipe cement makes such a tight joint, it literally welds the plastic together, that it is doubtful that even professional football players could knock that elbow off the pipe using a battering ram but would instead totally destroy the elbow along with severely damaging the pipe and probably some siding as well.

Again, try to push the elbow (the side without the stub pipe) onto the pipe in the wall. If it fits snugly then it was never glued. If there is no way that it is going to fit, or if it is much closer to the siding than before then it might be broken.

Was that stub pipe visible in the original installation or was it the opposite end of the elbow?
 
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Old 03-10-13, 11:03 PM
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From what I can see, I agree with Furd. The pieces of pipe and the stub do not show signs of a fracture, just of something that came or was bumped apart.
 
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Old 03-11-13, 09:13 AM
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Something which caught my eye is the discoloring of the 45. I wouldn't expect it to be brown like it is. Combustion problem?
 
 

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