Heating Bedroom in basement

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Old 09-18-13, 05:54 PM
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Heating Bedroom in basement

I am building a bedroom in my basement and I have to add a duct to it. Will the heat have a hard time making it across the ceiling and down to the register? I am using 6 inch oval duct. The span from the trunk line is 11 feet across the ceiling then 8 feet down.

Also, what about Carbon Monoxide Detectors? I was told they don't go in the basement or near the furnace or H2o Tank.

Thanks
 
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Old 09-18-13, 07:26 PM
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Are you sure a bedroom in the basement is permitted? Some places require 2 exits and other stuff.

All bed rooms should have a CO detector. Please post a link to where it is said they should not be in a basement.

You want a register where air will leave the furnace and enter the basement. Will there be a register to suck basement air back into the furnace?

How is the furnace and hotwater heater getting air to feed their burners? When you put the bedroom in the basement are you going to seal the basement from outside air?

Do you need a heater in the basement? You say you have a furnace and a hot water heater, they will put some heat into the basement.

You should consider bringing you local building department or an HVAC pro into the planning to make sure all this makes sense.
 
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Old 09-19-13, 03:09 AM
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I called the CO Company once regarding the placement of detectors that an electrician installed (as part of seller concessions) and they said not to put them w/in "so many feet" of the furnace or hot water heater.

Yes the room was built w/ egress windows, etc... The house is brand new.

It's ironic you said what you said about the CO detectors because I thought the same thing. When I called FirstAlert and they said not to put them in the basement, I said "Well, wouldn't you want them closest to the source"? And they said no, I think because of false readings.

Joe
 
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Old 09-19-13, 04:45 AM
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Joe, if you have trusses above, I would run flex ducting rather than rigid. Too easy, and no, the air won't have a tough time in its travels. But as mentioned, return air is as important as supply, so make sure doors are cut off short enough or a return register is provided to ensure air moves back to the unit for recirculation.

You want the CO detectors in the basement, just not close to a normally emitting unit. CO detectors are quite sensitive, and although you wouldn't expect ANY emission from your furnace or water heater, it happens, thus the spacing.

Is your basement totally below grade? If so, it is geothermally correct and will need little heat or A/C to keep it comfortable as the walls will remain the same temperature year 'round. I wouldn't over do ducting, in other words.
 
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Old 09-19-13, 11:28 AM
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Is your basement totally below grade? If so, it is geothermally correct and will need little heat or A/C to keep it comfortable as the walls will remain the same temperature year 'round. I wouldn't over do ducting, in other words.
Sorry, Larry - have to disagree on that one: we have to heat the basements in this kind of climate because that constant year round temperature is uncomfortably cold.
 
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Old 09-19-13, 01:59 PM
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Mitch, I meant "little" heat and cool, not NONE. He could reduce the amount of flow to the area and still maintain comfort. I wouldn't think several dumps of 6 or 8" ducting would be necessary.
 
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Old 09-19-13, 04:46 PM
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CO detectors are quite sensitive,...
Hardly. Residential carbon monoxide detectors are quite IN-sensitive. In addition to being insensitive they also have timing functions so that a lower level of CO has to remain for very long times before alarming.

While I think that having a CO monitor is a good idea I sure wouldn't rely on it alerting me to a serious problem from a suspected piece of equipment in a timely manner. More like an umbrella in addition to a raincoat.
 
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Old 09-19-13, 06:23 PM
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Before doing any work I would suggest trying to get a handle on how much heat you need in the basement. Heat loss from the furnace and ducts, the hot water heater and whatever electric devices are in the basement not to mention people or pets might be enough. Try an electrical heater this winter and see if it does the job. 1500 Watt electric heaters put out 5,119.5 BTUs. So if a 1500 watt heater is fine then you do not need much heat. So why put ugly duct work in if it is not needed? It may also be possible to just remove some of the duct tape sealing joints in the existing duct work to allow some hot air to escape into the basement.

As far as the CO detector goes, the bedroom needs one. I doubt it will issue false alarms. I have a CO detector above a gas fireplace and it has never alerted.
 
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Old 09-19-13, 06:47 PM
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As far as the CO detector goes, the bedroom needs one. I doubt it will issue false alarms. I have a CO detector above a gas fireplace and it has never alerted.
My point exactly. ojke-dgmna[-dskglp
 
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Old 09-19-13, 07:07 PM
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So, do you think I would need a helper fan inside the duct for that length run?
 
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Old 09-19-13, 07:14 PM
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No. ih0pjoehg0trkhbieHWR
 
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Old 09-19-13, 07:29 PM
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I think I forgot to say it is 22 ft down the main trunk line, 11 ft across the ceiling and 8 ft down the wall. Total of 41 feet.
 
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Old 09-19-13, 08:43 PM
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There are plenty of resources for designing an HVAC system. Your real question is if your blower can send the required amount of hot air through a new length of duct of the diameter and length you plan to use.

Duct sizing and CFM ratings
http://www.doityourself.com/forum/ga...ratings.html#b


Residential Duct Systems - Selection and Design of Ducted HVAC Systems
Residential Duct Systems - Selection and Design of Ducted HVAC Systems


Rules and *Rules of Thumb for Duct Systems
http://efficientcomfort.net/Charts/R...ct_Systems.pdf
 
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Old 09-20-13, 12:43 PM
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Larry:

I know you meant little, not no but I pump most of my heat into the basement in the winter - it gets cold down there.

Not tryin' to fight with ya.
 
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Old 09-20-13, 03:10 PM
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Not tryin' to fight with ya.
Heck, I know that!! Every situation is different. Ours is certainly different from yours. We have heated and cooled basements with 3" eye ball ductwork with good success, where large ductwork was impractical due to obstructions. It fits in the stud bays, and a couple of them move a good bit of air. I think, too it has to do with return air. If there is no clear return to the unit, the supply won't work as well.
 
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