To fill or not to fill? That is the question...


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Old 10-07-13, 12:15 AM
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To fill or not to fill? That is the question...

Ok so my girlfriend and I moved into this older small house on the river about mid summer. The landlord was pretty adamant about making sure we got the heating oil put in and plugging in the heater for the tank before it got too cold so it didnt damage her system or something idk (she kinda went blah blah blah do this do that im going back to Florida your on your own). So its gonna cost like over 800 bucks to fill a tank and im thinking about using some space heaters (i know, i know) to heat the house. First reason being she refuses to have the maintenance man fix some issues with crooked doors and just in general the house is gonna be drafty, secondly the heating system has probably never been properly maintained so it is not gonna be efficient and might need more than one fill up this winter, and thirdly i personally think that electric heat will be cheaper (we came from an apartment comparable in size that had electric furnace and bill was around 130-150 peak in winter). So that said, would trying to use some space heaters to heat all winter be stupid? I figure about 3 of them would do pretty good, its under 1000 sq ft and 1 level 1 bedroom and kitchen and living room open. And also main question im here is will there be any damage to the system by not using it and not putting oil in it and not plugging in tank heater? And if i wanted to use it mid winter would i be able to plug in the heater cord and use it?
 
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Old 10-07-13, 06:27 AM
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I see no way space heaters would be cheaper to run.
A really old house with outdated wiring can be easily over loaded with space heaters and may even be a fire hazard.
 
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Old 10-07-13, 07:24 AM
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I don't understand your logic. How or why does your displeasure for the house affect how it will be heated? If you are so unhappy with the house, landlord and their maintenance why are you renting the house?

Search online for "electric heat calculator". Enter your houses information and you will see that you don't have much hope heating your house in Ohio in winter with a few plug in heaters.
 
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Old 10-07-13, 07:58 AM
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You need to heat the entire house or risk frozen & burst water pipes & drains. The landlord will then hold you accountable for the repairs.
 
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Old 10-07-13, 01:09 PM
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Well like I said we just moved in about mid summer and from then till now we have determined that we are dissatisfied with the landlord and the property in general. The only problem is the lease agreement, so if I can stick this winter out and save up money im gonna get out of here. And also I used an electric furnace at an apartment we rented before, idk how comparable tgat is to a couple space heaters.
 
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Old 10-07-13, 01:17 PM
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I understand I need to heat the whole house, if its cold enough to freeze pipes in there I wont be living there. And like I said if I needed to use the oil tank say mid winter would I be able to throw some diesel in it and fire it up. I just wanna know if ill damage the system by not putting oil in or not using the system.
 
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Old 10-07-13, 04:13 PM
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This thread has no logic.
The OP is unhappy with his rental, but has to stay because of a lease.
Now throw in that he wants to make his life more uncomfortable by not heating the place while he's there.

Am I missing something here? Aside from the obvious issues that were stated, why would you do that?
 
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Old 10-07-13, 04:41 PM
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The electrical service in your house probably isn't adequate for electric heat anyway.

You could always just keep the heat low (like 60F) and heat a couple of rooms properly with space heaters when they're occupied. (but never leave them unattended)

Also, get yourself a co alarm with a digital display if you think the furnace is very old and hasn't been maintained.
 
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Old 10-08-13, 12:45 AM
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Thanks Muggle for a logical and reasonable response that seems like the smart way to go. And tomf63 I guess I shouldnt have made it so obvious that I was pissed at my landlord, but when you have as many issues that arent resolved by your landlord as I do and they are just being cheapskates and have never had the oil furnace maintained I just see more dollar signs burning. I thought electric was a reasonable option for heating the small house. So sorry my original post sounded like a screw my landlord deal, I just want to heat my home as safe and cost effective as possible and even if electric cost a little bit more in the end I would be ok with that because I wouldn't have to shell out 800 bucks right there to have the tank filled. So anyone that has any other input on heating without using the oil it would be greatly appreciated as winter is creeping up fast thank you.
 
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Old 10-08-13, 11:37 AM
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Another option is to have the furnace serviced. You will be the one getting the benefit from it so it would not be wasted money. A guy I know has a similar problem in a house he rented. The kitchen faucet leaked real bad and he could not get the landlord to fix it. He, instead of paying $10 for a new cartridge to fix it, paid $50-$60 extra each billing period for his water bill.
 
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Old 10-08-13, 12:13 PM
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Most leases specify what the landlord covers and or what your deductible might be for general repairs. Read your lease, fix what's necessary and deduct it from your rent. Document everything, even take photos. That document protects you. Don't make yourself more uncomfortable in a rental you don't like, that makes no sense at all.
 
 

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