Plastic gas piping

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Old 10-17-13, 09:20 AM
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Question Plastic gas piping

Does anyone know if plastic piping is allowed for natural gas lines. I live in Ohio and purchasing a HUD home that I will need to replace the furnace and hot water tank. I noticed that the gas line is plastic to feed both the devices. I of course noticed this when looking at the photos I took. Hopefully, the main supply line is not plastic. Normally its black pipe in everything I've seen. Thanks for the help.
 
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Old 10-17-13, 11:41 AM
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Plastic is not an acceptable material for gas piping.


I can just imagine a fire melting a gas pipe so that it is freely venting into some's basement...
 
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Old 10-17-13, 11:53 AM
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Are you sure it's plastic or is it just plastic coated?
 
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Old 10-17-13, 12:13 PM
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Should not be plastic/poly... It probably is corrugated stainless steel with a yellow plastic covering...

Can you take a pic?

Edit.... Posted this late.. Others had already replied...
 
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Old 10-17-13, 12:13 PM
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Is it possible the gas line you saw is Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing (CSST). It looks like plastic from a distance but is actually just the covering over the stainless steel tubing. Here is a photo of CSST installed. This type of gas piping is quite common in many parts of the country and can even be buried underground if done properly.
 
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Old 10-17-13, 04:09 PM
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Hopefully this works for a photo. The pipe is plastic. A contractor today told me it is OK to use but it has to be bonded to the ground on the panel. This is different and I think I may change it back to regular pipe.

015.jpg Photo by Thor2911 | Photobucket
 

Last edited by Dean Miller; 10-17-13 at 04:27 PM.
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Old 10-17-13, 04:17 PM
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Looks like CSST to me...


What it say on the pipe in those black letters?



 
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Old 10-17-13, 05:16 PM
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Was the flood water really 4' high?? For how long? Just curious.
Call the contractor and ask how he proposes to bond plastic pipe.
 
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Old 10-17-13, 07:22 PM
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Looks like CSST to me too. Look at the printing on the plastic. If it says "Gastite", "WardFlex", "TiteFlex", or any of several other brands it is CSST.
They make special bonding clamps for bonding the CSST to the panel.
 
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Old 10-18-13, 04:18 PM
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Chandler, not sure how long it was that deep. It only had an 1" of water when I looked at it. I'm guessing it the fittings that are bonded to help get rid of any static that may develop. I'm going to look at the house again tomorrow and check to see if the main supply is metal. If so I think I'm going to change it over.
 
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Old 10-18-13, 04:42 PM
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Not sure why you would feel it necessary to change perfectly good code compliant piping (stainless) to steel. I mean, sure, if you want to hard pipe a bit closer, makes sense. But you'll still need a flex connection at the end most likely. I have about 4' of it between the hard pipe and the furnace connection on my rooftop package unit. Been there for 23 yrs I'd guess.
 
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