Honeywell Gas Valve Leaking Around Shaft

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Old 12-29-13, 12:09 PM
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Honeywell Gas Valve Leaking Around Shaft

I have an old PIONEER wall furnace, probably mid to late 1940 manufacture. It has a gas valve manufactured by Honeywell.

It has never exhibited any issues until this winter, when it shot a ball of fire out of the housing (where the pilot/burner select valve knob is located) when we attempted to light the pilot

Is there an o-ring that can be replaced in these valves, or will I need to find a replacement valve?

TIA,

Mark
 
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Old 12-29-13, 02:40 PM
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No. You need a new gas valve.
 
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Old 12-30-13, 05:36 AM
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when it shot a ball of fire out of the housing
Why would you even consider a repair job vs a replacement?
 
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Old 12-30-13, 01:56 PM
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Since I am not familiar with HVAC systems, I came here to ask a simple question. I thought maybe a valve could be repaired, and possibly that some firms do such repairs or sell parts to a 'doityourself' kind of person. That's why I would even consider it.

With that said, if you visited one of my automotive forums and asked if it were possible to rebuild brake calipers, I definitely wouldn't respond with something like "Why would you even consider a repair job vs a replacement?"

Thank you for the non condescending answer, Furd.
 
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Old 12-30-13, 09:44 PM
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I worked in a facility that had several boilers with four-inch Hydramotor gas valves.

(For some insane reason the forum won't allow me to attach an image.)

We found leakage at the seal where the valve stem protruded from the bonnet to mate with the hydraulic cylinder and limit switch assembly. Thinking that a new valve was several hundred dollars it was decided to try to replace just the seal. Unfortunately a seal replacement kit was simply not available. Discussing the issue with a contractor I was told that it is a liability issue, that the manufacturer of the seal could be at least partially liable for a failure even if the the fault was improper installation by the user.

After that we ended up replacing four such valves in the next couple of years. So the bottom line is that gas valves, either small residential models, medium sized commercial models or large industrial models are considered safety controls and absolutely no field repairs on the valve itself is allowed.
 
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Old 12-30-13, 09:50 PM
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four-inch Hydramotor gas valves.
Geez Joel what W.C... ??? That like 10 to 40 million BTU's, no???.....
 
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Old 12-30-13, 10:00 PM
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Four and a half psi inlet as I recall, might have been as high as seven psi. 25 million (25,000,000) BTUs per hour.
 
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Old 12-31-13, 09:53 AM
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Since I am not familiar with HVAC systems, I came here to ask a simple question. I thought maybe a valve could be repaired, and possibly that some firms do such repairs or sell parts to a 'doityourself' kind of person. That's why I would even consider it.

With that said, if you visited one of my automotive forums and asked if it were possible to rebuild brake calipers, I definitely wouldn't respond with something like "Why would you even consider a repair job vs a replacement?"



Point well taken!
 
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Old 01-01-14, 01:17 PM
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I'm having difficulty finding an exact replacement for this valve (Honeywell V5206D 1006 1). I have no idea what the BTU rating is either. I'm pretty sure it's the millivolt type, as there doesn't appear to be any electrical wires connected to it.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]23860[/ATTACH]

[ATTACH=CONFIG]23863[/ATTACH]

[ATTACH=CONFIG]23861[/ATTACH]



On the up side, it's in a vacant rental house we're renovating (in So Cal), so I'm not pressed for time, yet.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]23859[/ATTACH]


A friend's handyman came by and looked at it. He said he could locate and install a new replacement valve for around $200. ... I think I'll take him up on it.


Thanks for the replies. Happy New Year ...
 
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Old 01-01-14, 01:50 PM
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If you can get it done for 200 you are coming out well. I'm guessing the replacement valve is going to require new pilot tubing and possibly gas fittings to make it all come together. I'd have him look over the heat exchanger while he is at it.
 
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Old 01-02-14, 12:19 AM
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It has been a long, long time since I have seen one of those valves and (unfortunately) I no longer have my old Honeywell manuals. If I remember correctly that style of valve had the ability to change out the operator, it could use an electric (24 volt) operator, maybe a line-voltage (120 volt) operator or a hydraulic operator as you have. It does NOT use a millivolt system but a standard (30 millivolt) thermocouple and looking at the pictures the connection is (obviously) on the side of the valve away from the camera. The hydraulic operator has a fluid-filled bulb connected via the capillary tube that operates the main gas valve by exerting pressure (caused by a temperature change at the bulb) against the spring adjustable by the temperature setting knob on the valve assembly.

These valves were never very precise in maintaining a set temperature. While retro-fitting a new and different valve IS possible if it were my place I would opt for an entirely new furnace. that beast must be at least thirty years old, probably older and in my opinion it should be replaced. A new valve, retrofitted with the additional controls would be a significant percentage of an entirely new furnace.

Okay, I just looked at Grainger (not the cheapest supplier by any means) and it seems that I am way off on the cost of wall furnaces. I remember them at around $400-$500 but the least expensive one I found was $757. had a millivolt system, was rated at 35,000 BTUs and burnt propane. They have quite a selection from upright like you have to low-boy cabinet models and the prices range up to more than two grand.
 
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Old 01-02-14, 09:52 AM
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Apparently, the cost of anything made with metal has gone up dramatically. A couple of years ago, a friend needed to replace a wall furnace in a shop behind his garage. He was surprised at the cost of a new unit at Home Depot or Lowe's ($700. + for the low-priced units). I found some lower priced units in the local throw-away paper, but they were still around $500.

I'll look into a whole new unit, but I'd like to retain the outer cover if possible ... it is more architecturally attuned to the structure ...
 
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Old 01-07-14, 08:58 PM
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That is a very common problem with that model of valve. Years ago as was mentioned Honeywell did supply parts for valves. You could change out the operator, even the power unit in the safety section. Now it's replace the valve. And yes you are correct there is an "O" ring that is the problem.
 
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Old 04-22-14, 02:05 PM
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Success

My how time flies. I had forgotten all about this thread until I started cleaning up the inbox on an old email account that I don't visit very often.

It's been a couple of months since I took the old Honeywell valve to a local appliance repair store. They had a replacement valve that did the trick wonderfully. I think it cost me around $175 for everything.

Thanks for all the replies and guidance

Mark
 
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Old 05-07-14, 06:34 AM
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Thank you for coming back and letting us know how it went
 
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