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should air be coming out of front of furnace ? low air volume at room vents

should air be coming out of front of furnace ? low air volume at room vents

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  #1  
Old 04-12-14, 08:47 AM
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should air be coming out of front of furnace ? low air volume at room vents

Hi everyone.

Our home has a forced air gas furnace connected with central air.
(The furnace is an older one, a "Snyder General" model guf100a12-n manufactured in Oct 1987.)

The bottom of the furnace has the filter and fan. The fan is spinning and the filter has been changed.

The middle of the furnace contains the gas burners to heat up the air.

The top of the furnace has a squarish metal piece (plenium ??) that leads to the left over to the chimney/exhaust. upwards it leads to some vent piping, then to the rest of the house.

The metal piece on top is shooting out air to the front.
Last night my wife and I realized that the house went up to 80 deg F in spite of the ac being on all day long, and outside temps were at most 74 here in ohio.

Checking the vents there was virtually no airflow to any of the rooms.

down in the basement we noted the air coming out of the front of the furnace/ac unit. (The compressor outside was running without issue.)

The air coming out did not change when the thermostat was changed from cool to fan only. (No airflow to upstairs, could feel air out of the front of th furnace)

We removed the metal box from the top, noticed there was previously some black calking material (RTV sealant ??) that had dried up and was falling off.

My wife went out to the store, and could not find any high temp sealant, and brought home some silicone caulking material meant for bath-tubs. we applied the caulk to the surface of the furnace, some on the back of the "metal box" and then screwed it back on. I added more caulk where the lip was that the air had been coming out of.

this morning I turned on the ac, we have SOME airflow, but there is still air coming out, and I would think it should be a sealed system.

am I correct that there should be NO air going anywhere that isnt a vent ?

thanks

sean
 
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  #2  
Old 04-12-14, 08:58 AM
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Correct.... you want all the processed air to return to the conditioned space.

Metal foil tape makes a very effective sealing method. It comes on rolls, is heavier than aluminum foil and has a peel off tape exposing self stick glue.

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A picture or two of what you have there would be helpful too.
http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html
 
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Old 04-12-14, 10:24 AM
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Old 04-12-14, 04:03 PM
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The air leak

First, please be sure that you are not getting any CO in your house. I hope that
tou have a working CO detector in your house. Your combustion chamber fire side might have burned through into the air handler side. The tape might help if some of the sheet metal moved, or somehow opened up. Be careful with this.
Sid
 
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Old 04-12-14, 04:12 PM
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A few more pictures from further back so I can see the entire furnace and the ductwork may help. From the description and the very limited view I would say that the evaporator coil (cooling coil) is either frozen or is extremely dirty. If the seam where the air is exiting is on the furnace side of the coil, as I suspect it is, the air escaping is further proof of a plugged evaporator coil.
 
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Old 04-12-14, 06:04 PM
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It's very hard to tell what you are pointing too. You should not have any air blowing out of any connection on that round silver pipe when in A/C mode. That is the exhaust flue. It doesn't get taped.

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Old 04-13-14, 09:41 PM
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more info

No,not the pipe. Behind the pipe.

where the painted metal and the unpainted sheet metal on top meet.
 
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Old 04-14-14, 10:29 PM
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adding more pictures

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First picture is of the front view with the exhaust pipe moved out of the way for the show to expose the caulking.

(Pipe since put back properly in place)


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picture 2 is close up of front

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side of the furnace

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rear of furnace #1

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rear of furnace #2
as seen in the attached pictures, where the painted part meets the plain metal part in the front (slathered with caulking now) is where the air leak is coming from. (The caulking job was not perfect and since is not heat resistant I will need to redo anyhow.)

The water leaking from the side has been there for years, the previous owner tried to patch up a leak with RTV and it has started to fail over the years, the water that would normally run down the drain hose is leaking out instead.

the humidity control in the back is new to me and Ive been living here for 6 years. Just never noticed it before.
 
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Old 04-17-14, 09:21 AM
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can anyone provide more info ? my FIL says he thinks a clog happened, Im unsure

Can anyone provide any more info ?

Im inclined to just caulk/seal the air leak and leave it at that.

My father in law states he believes the system must have a clog and that we should have the furnace cleaned.

(I would think that would only clean the burners not the air ducts)

since caulking was tried a 2nd time less air is escaping.

should the furnace be cleaned ? should ducts be cleaned ?

is this a major issue since now I have air flow ?


thanks for any help


sean
 
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Old 04-17-14, 09:54 AM
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I agree caulk the joint, stop the leak. Go ahead and check the blower to see if there is dirt build up on the blades.
 
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Old 04-21-14, 02:07 PM
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As the others have said, a dirty coil, filter, or blower can greatly reduce airflow. The blower is easy to access, but checking the coil might be difficult or impossible; if the blower is really dirty, you can be sure that the coil is clogged.

After 22+ years the heat exchanger may be cracked and the a/c is probably leaking refrigerant by now.

The type of furnace you have is < 70% efficient and hasn't been produced since 1992, so if you're in a heating dominant climate, it might really make sense to upgrade to something safer and more efficient.
 
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