~30 year old heater--worth replacing?

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Old 11-25-14, 12:37 PM
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~30 year old heater--worth replacing?

Hi,

My first post here. I am a bit of a do-it-yourselfer, but when it comes to heating and complex electric it's beyond my skill level. My heater went out a few days ago. The motor had been replaced 2 years ago. The motor runs, but the fan never turns on. It will turn on if I turn it on manually on the thermostat and blows room temp. air.

I called a company today via a referral, and he told me that if the heater is older than 25 yrs old, he will not work on it for liability reasons (something else could go wrong in the near future and even be dangerous, like spewing out carbon monoxide). This guy is reputable. I am debating between getting a new heater or trying to get someone out there to try and diagnose the problem and give me an estimate (which can't hurt). But is it reasonable to just change the old heater for a new one after about 30 years? TIA for any advice.
 
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Old 11-25-14, 01:42 PM
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25 years is getting up there for a furnace. But with that said, a good inspection will reveal if it has any life left in it. For someone to tell you (on the phone) they wont work on a 25 year old system for liability reasons is just wrong. Sounds like the hard sell pitch if you ask me.

Have a reputable company physically check the system out and give you a recommendation on what to do. If the heat exchanger is in good shape, there's no reason they shouldn't be able to get it going again.
 
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Old 11-25-14, 03:57 PM
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A 30 year old furnace is most likely to be < 70% efficient, single stage and oversized.

If you live in a heating dominant climate, you should replace it to save fuel and improve comfort even if it's still safe.

You should only keep it for now if you have plans to change windows or insulate. (you'll need a smaller furnace after doing so)
 
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Old 12-06-14, 10:12 PM
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Thanks for the replies. I live in Southern California, so we don't use very much heat. After the initial post, I continued to research and talk to different people. I contacted one last installer/service man, who came over to look at my needs and talk about new furnaces and installation. He diagnosed the problem instead. It was a time delay relay for the pre-burner cycle. Because of the area where I live, I decided it was worth fixing it instead of changing it. Saved me a lot of money as well.
 
 

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