Extending exhaust out a tad OK?

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Old 12-09-15, 06:06 PM
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Extending exhaust out a tad OK?

I have condensation dripping down on the electrical box for my AC (there is a name for that box, can't think of it). In freezing weather has a nice block of ice covering it. Can't be doing the house any good. I know the box is supposed to be weather-proof. Where the exterior pipe connects to the pipe coming from the furnace, the screw is all rusted, it obviously drips from there. Maybe it has to drip there? Not sure. I was thinking on connecting a short extension on there, maybe 4 inches or so, and sealing it, then connecting the existing elbow back on and NOT sealing that so it will drip further away from the house? Or is it OK to just seal up what is there now? Will the excess water just drain back to the furnace?
 
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Old 12-10-15, 04:49 AM
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The electrical box is normally called an a/c disconnect.

Can you tell where the water is coming from? Is it out of the end or is there a leak in the pipe? Normally steam comes out and water condenses on the inside the pipe then runs backwards to the furnace and out the condensate drain there.

I don't see the rusted screw.

Can you post a pic of the top exhaust?
 
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Old 12-10-15, 05:09 AM
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Where is the screw you are talking about? is that pipe on the outside glued properly? Shouldn't be dripping there and I believe that pipe should be pitched back toward the condensate pump,do you have the intstall manual? It should spec. out how the pipes should be installed.
 
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Old 12-10-15, 02:06 PM
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Windy as he double toothpicks here now but I will run out and get pics. You can see the screw, it is under the elbow where it connects to the pipe coming out of the house, it is dark with rust but did determine I can get it out with a pliers to turn it with. If you look at the intake (further away) you can see the screw is in good shape, like a green metallic finish, the other one is rusted, and that joint is where the water (condensate) drips out. Yes there is steam as well. I did talk to my brother in law again and he confirmed the water will just go back to the furnace and drip out (I realized there is a tube to do this as well as drain water from the AC evaporator, 2 different tubes). NOw that he understands the problem he said to just deal that joint, he said I could use PVC glue or something like a silicone caulk. I will also get a stainless steel screw.
 
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Old 12-10-15, 02:53 PM
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OK here are the pics, again the very start of the elbow, that seam or joint, is where the water drips from, right where you'd expect it would. Thinking removing and using caulk?
 
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Old 12-11-15, 05:20 AM
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I have never seen a screw installed there,if you get that screw out that fitting will probably come off,reglue it,there maybe a specific glue for that as that condensate is acidic, just curious,are there other connections along that run that are screwed together,looks like more screws on the other fitting above that El
 

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Old 12-11-15, 04:10 PM
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I can see there are screws higher up. Inside the house I'm pretty sure it is a straight run from the furnace to outside. The ones further up on the exhaust I guess don't bother me because no water is leaking there.
 
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Old 12-11-15, 06:18 PM
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I can only think of a couple of reasons for the screws. The most obvious is that the installer didn't read the instructions concerning gluing the piping together. He may have been familiar with sheet metal piping where screws ARE used. Or maybe he thought screws were better than gluing as it would allow disassembly at some future date.

At any rate, the screws are wrong, should be removed and the fittings glued in place. And yes, you CAN move the exhaust a bit to prevent any condensation from dripping on the electrical boxes.
 
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Old 12-11-15, 06:35 PM
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Thanks to all, I could use an extender to move it out but am reading a lot online about similar problems. So ultimately it looks like I should try to remove it at the first elbow and try to glue it (or reglue it depending on if it ever WAS glued), if I fix the water drippage I should be OK, and I also understand that water leaking at this spot is not normal.
 
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Old 12-11-15, 06:40 PM
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We still have some warm weather (for this time of year) coming up. I know the primer and glue are a fire hazard, if I can shut the furnace off for an hour or so that should be enough time for the glue to cure, right? Just lay it on nice and thick to help seal it? Would anyone think I should replace that first elbow, or reusing it OK? Do I need to do anything to the pipe that exits the house, sand or prep it any other way? And don't install the screw?
 
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Old 12-11-15, 07:24 PM
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Pull the screw, remove the elbow, wipe the pipe and the elbow socket with a clean rag to remove any dirt and moisture. Slather the pipe end and the elbow socket with solvent cement and push the elbow on the pipe, twisting it a bit to spread the cement and align the elbow. I wouldn't bother with any primer. Remember, the pressure is almost non-existent. Immediately wipe up any cement that oozes out of the joint.

The exhaust temperature is too low to be a fire hazard. The cement will set up fairly quickly, even in the colder weather. I'd say a wait of an hour before firing the furnace would be more than ample. Fifteen minutes would probably be fine.
 
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Old 12-22-15, 08:55 AM
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Well guys, I did this and now am thinking the water might just be trickling down from the exhaust outlet itself.
I did check everything out, the pipes do angle towards the furnace and there is a good amount of water dripping out of the tubes and in to the floor drain as it should. It might take a hard freeze again to see how it does in cold weather (40s today).
I am thinking on taking that top 90 degree and either facing it away from the house or at least angling it and maybe out a short straight piece of 2" pvc on it (maybe 3-6" piece?) just to get the exhaust out away from the new siding.
I smeared some sealant around the entry of the bottom 90 degree albow just in case that is still leaking some condensation, it is hard to tell. Have to catch it in the act I guess.
 
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