Trane XR90 furnace blower motor inducer


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Old 04-08-16, 03:31 PM
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Trane XR90 furnace blower motor inducer

My house has a Trane XR90 natural gas furnace (model TUY080R9V3W1). The blower inducer motor continues to get louder each season - when the house was inspected this was noted as an issue.

Doing some research, it appears the original motor is no longer manufactured, so Trane has introduced (very pricey) kits to replace - see Variable Speed 92% Furnace Draft Inducer for Trane and American Standard.

I'd rather not spend $1k+ on the repair, so looking for guidance on extending the life of the existing motor, I've found a couple things:
The general consensus seems that these are well built motors.
Anyone else out there have experience with this issue? Any other general advice while I have the inducer motor out of the furnace? I'm extremely comfortable with electronics, soldering, multi-meter, etc.

Detailed part numbers list
Trane BLW00732
Trane C341445P01
Fasco 70005833
GE ECM Motor
Fasco Part 8767-4220
GE Part 5SME44JG2002E
Specifictions - 50/60 Hz, 1.3A, 5200 RPM, 1/15 HP
 
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Old 04-08-16, 05:21 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

There were problems with that inducer series. The replacement from Trane is not just the inducer..... it's a new control board, pressure switch, inducer and wiring harness.

I don't know of any way of extending the life of that old motor.

There is some hope for the larger blower motors that the link you left included.... not the inducer. The second link discussed magnets that became unglued. I'm not sure the motor would even run if they came unglued.

My forum partner, Houston, may have more to add.
 
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Old 04-08-16, 07:01 PM
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Thanks a ton for responding - I really appreciate your assessment.

I did notice the Trane replacement is a whole new control board, pressure switch, wiring, etc. Sucks a whole new board is needed, but if there isn't anything I can do - I suppose I'll just wait for it to fail entirely - no use in wasting time/effort in something that can't be fixed. $1K for preventative maintenance and less startup noise doesn't sound reasonable to me.
 
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Old 04-09-16, 03:46 PM
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Ummm. The odds are pretty good that the motor will fail completely when you want the furnace to work badly.

From your description, I'd agree that the part is waiting to fail.

I'd seriously consider replacing the motor before it fails, or at a minimum have part replacement well researched so you know where to buy it and how long it will take to get.
 
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Old 01-16-17, 09:36 PM
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how to make your xv90 run forever

I have this same furnace, and had one or two inducer motors replaced under my extended warranty. When that ran out and the motor failed again (got really noisy) I decided to have a look at repairing it myself. Long story short, this is a nice design for a inducer motor - and it works great and should last a long time IF you replace the unsealed bearings with sealed bearings. That is the only problem with the motor. The factory used an unsealed bearing which is exposed to water from the combustion gasses. They are guaranteed to fail. The good news is the parts to repair the motor cost about $6.00. The bad news is it is a fairly involved process.
To repair, you need to drill off the plastic at the center of the blower wheel to expose the motor shaft. Then using two of the holes opposite each other in the plastic wheel as guides, drill two small holes and tap them to 4-40 or 6-32 thread. Next make a "puller" out of a small piece of steel. Think steering wheel puller (just google it). This is basically what you are building. If you can picture what I am talking about, this is not a big deal. Basically, you attach the steel "puller" to the blower wheel, and then with a hole tapped in the center, over the motor shaft, screw in another screw - say 10-32, to pull the wheel off. The wheel comes off pretty easily this way. You can NOT pry it off and expect it to ever run true again. Once the wheel is off, you need to dissemble the rest of the motor. This requires some soldering. Nothing difficult if you know how to solder. Once apart, replace both bearings with high quality sealed bearings and reassemble. I fill the tapped holes with silicone so they don't rust. If I have to do this again, just tap out the silicone. I have repaired several motors this way and they all run nice and quiet now. (I bought some used bad motors to experiment with - and they all work fine after rebuilding)
Bottom line is for a few hours work to figure out how to repair it, then build the tool and do it, I turned a $1000 bill into a $6 bill. Way worth it in my book and I have zero fear of a failure now.

The other problem to watch for is water dripping onto the control board from a plugged up inducer drain. Make sure this is not happening. I went so far as to take my controller board and mount it inside a plastic baggy so any future water leak will not kill the board. This is also easy to do and will cost you one size large zip lock bag. Far less than the $600 or so for a new controller.

I probably should not have had to do all that work on a furnace, but I really like the two stage idea and it does save a lot of gas. This is a good furnace if you get these two design problems fixed.

And for the record, I am a software developer and shade tree mechanic on my own cars. I am not any sort of HVAC tech.
 
phreich voted this post useful.
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Old 01-31-17, 12:14 PM
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diyforall

Sounds like a great fix!
Could you please share where you got the bearings from and a part number if possible?
Thanks.........
 
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Old 11-03-23, 05:43 PM
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Bearing details:
Order a set of quality "sealed" bearings from a trusted source. Most cities have a bearing supply warehouse, or you can order them online. The bearings are a standard size 608 bearing, which are 8 x 22 x 7 Millimeters.

The originals were marked NSK 608Z. The Z at the end indicates a metal "shield" -- not a seal. The shield will keep debris out of the bearing, but not liquids or vapor, which is why these bearings fail. I expanded on what diyforall documented above in this newer thread (including some pictures):
Trane XL90/XR90 furnace blower motor inducer -- more info

I would have included that information here, but, at the time, this thread was locked. Glad to see it is now unlocked.
 

Last edited by phreich; 11-03-23 at 05:47 PM. Reason: fixed typos
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Old 11-04-23, 01:41 PM
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You can always drop me a PM if you need help.
 
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Old 12-28-23, 10:52 AM
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I am attempting this fix on my own Trane XL90 Furnace. Do you know of a replacement fan? my homemade puller worked originally but on my second attempt at rebuilding it, it blew out the plastic portion of the fan where I had tapped into the metal. if that makes sense....
I also used 608 sealed bearings, but they don't seem to press on. They fit almost perfectly but it seems like I need a slightly smaller inner diameter if I want them like they originally were. I Think this is where things are failing my right now and is causing a vibration. There also seems to be a ticking sound? but I can't find anything rubbing.




My bearing fits this side but has just a tiny bit of wobble....



And I didn't get my hole perfectly centered so it blew out on me. Probably would be fine but now I'm thinking of trying a different fan blade If I can find something that would work.
 
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Old 01-03-24, 05:58 PM
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to @Microtin,
Sorry, I don't know of any place to get a replacement blower, other than possibly finding a seized "parts" unit on Ebay and getting the blower off of that.

I suspect the bearings you are trying to use are made out of spec, and that's why they are fitting so loosely on the shaft. The ones I got from a trusted bearing supplier had no slop on the shaft. They weren't a tight fit that required pressing them on, but there was no noticeable slop, as is seen with the bearing in your picture.

I would get a better set of sealed bearings and see if that makes a difference.

Regarding your damaged blower -- after you get a good pair of bearings installed, I suggest putting some tape around the hub to form a barrier to hold the epoxy in place, and then fill the "blown" area with epoxy, and remove the tape once it hardens. Otherwise your fan will be out-of-balance and will likely be noisy and have a lot of vibration, which will eventually lead to failure.

I hope this helps,
Philip
 
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Old 01-03-24, 09:30 PM
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I see Supply House has some wheels only. Measure yours and give them a try.
Supply House
 
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Old 01-08-24, 10:05 AM
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So I decided to go a different route. I expect to have to rebuild this eventually so I tack welded on a nut so I can be pulled of easily with just threading in a 1/4in bolt. I then balanced out the fan and squared it up so when it turns, its square with the case. This worked far better than I expected and is better than I found it. I used JB weld to resecure the plastic around that metal that I messed up.

Also, since this is a variable speed fan, I was worried that it would have issues with a different blade. I'm not sure if it calculates the CFM to pick a specific speed or if it goes to a specific speed, waits so many seconds, goes to another speed. I think if I got a more efficient fan, I could get the CFM wrong and then the pressure sensors wont trip when they are supposed to. I could be wrong but decided to not risk it.
 
 

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