Electrostatic Filters

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Old 11-23-16, 10:08 AM
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Electrostatic Filters

We are considering getting the metal electrostatic washable filter for the furnace/AC.

This would be to replace a Trion Air Bear (19.5 x 24 x 5) media air cleaner filter.

I have read on here that the thinner ones aren't recommended but I believe this one (special made) would be 3.5 inches thick.

Any advice on this? Thank you.
 
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Old 11-23-16, 10:17 AM
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Welcome to the forums.

I have to tell you that I though an electrostatic filter would be a great addition to my system plus reduce the cost of filter replacement.

It is a constant maintenance item and needs to be cleaned AT LEAST once a month. If you are into routine maintenance like that..... they work great. If allowed to get dirty.... they are useless.

Based on that.... I don't recommend them.
 
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Old 11-23-16, 10:22 AM
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Ok, thanks. I will keep that in mind.
 
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Old 11-24-16, 02:57 AM
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I've built two homes, one with the electrostatic filter, the other with the bulk cartridge filter, current house which was a spec uses standard filters.

I think my wife would agree none of them provided a "superior" dust free environment over the other.

They all have their pluses and minuses on cost and ongoing maintenance but I would not spend money to change one out.
 
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Old 11-24-16, 06:21 PM
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I would certainly pick your existing type of filter over an electronic or electrostatic filter.

When I think of electrostatic filters, I think of highly restrictive filters that shorten the lives of compressors and heat exchangers. I think that they are a bad idea that have a drastic effect on the CFM output of your airflow.

When I think of electronic filters, I think of a filter that takes 240 volts or 120 volts AC and transfer it to 8,500 volts DC to filter the air in the least restrictive option of these three. While it is the best of these 3 options it requires much more maintenance and replacement parts are expensive. I usually recommend a quarterly maintenance agreement to have the cells cleaned when these are in use.

Name:  Electronic aif filter.JPG
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The top image is an electronic air cleaner.
 
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Old 11-24-16, 07:05 PM
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Thank you for the replies. We have decided to stay with the same type of filter.

My next question is, do they have to be Trion Air Bear or would the generic type work just as well?

I found many online sites that list them as "comparable" to Air Bear. So, is there a compromise in quality to save a few dollars?
 
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Old 11-24-16, 07:24 PM
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I have always thought of Honeywell as the standard to compare to.
I like that your Trion filters are 5 inches thick. Honeywell mechanical filters are closer to 4 1/2 inches thick. This comes into play when you look at the CFM rating of the filter. A 5 inch 20 x 25 filter has a rating that will match a 5 ton system but a 4 1/2" filter will usually not have a rating of 2000 CFM.

Another thing to consider is the Merv rating. A Merv 12 will filter more particles than a Merv 10 but it would also be more restrictive. I usually select the Merv 10 for my home.

If an ECM motor is in use it will pull more amps when a more restrictive filter is in use but can deliver the desired CFM output til near 1 inch water column external static pressure.



A standard PSC motor will deliver less air as you restrict airflow more.
A manometer and the furnace manual can be used to measure the CFM output of a furnace at various ESP ranges.

 
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Old 11-25-16, 10:57 AM
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Our original installer put the Trion Air Bear with a Merv of 8 in, so sounds like it's best I continue with the same.

Thanks.
 
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Old 11-25-16, 11:11 AM
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I agree, I would certainly keep the existing mechanical filter.
We charge more to clean EAC cells than we do to replace mechanical filters.
 
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Old 11-26-16, 11:23 PM
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you've been given good information.

when deciding on a filter, look at maintenance costs.

the honeywell media is sold at big box stores for $40 or less. honeywell is good about supplying products to homeowners at reasonable prices.

a lot of other companies only sell to pros, so you can be forced to pay a 100% markup on the filter above retail.
 
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Old 11-27-16, 01:01 PM
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I am still wondering if the "generic" replacements for Air Bear work just as well.

Thanks.
 
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Old 11-27-16, 03:27 PM
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they should if they fit right.
 
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Old 11-27-16, 05:00 PM
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Ok, thanks very much for taking the time to reply.
 
 

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