Bacharach Draft-Rite 13-3000 Good Enough?

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Old 02-23-17, 10:47 AM
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Bacharach Draft-Rite 13-3000 Good Enough?

I see this draft gauge on ebay, is it good enough for tuning up home furnaces? I don't know what the 13-3000 means but would this model
have the correct range?

I don't mind spending another hundred bucks on a better one if it provides
a few more useful measurements. I have a Fluke Temp probe already so I
don't need that.

Anyone?
 
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Old 02-23-17, 01:19 PM
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Bacharach equipment is insanely overpriced in my opinion. Instead I recommend a Dwyer Magnehelic gauge with a 0-1 inch water column range. Usually available on E-bay for around $30.
 
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Old 02-23-17, 02:23 PM
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I watched this youtube video and he says the negative pressure is in the range of .02 to .05", won't that be hard to read on a 0 to 1" scale?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cCjAozBKpT4
Did he really mean .2 to .5", I have no idea what is correct.
$30 is an excellent price, thanks for the tip.
 
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Old 02-23-17, 09:52 PM
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Here is what you need. Dwyer 2000-00N Magnehelic Differential Pressure Gage - 15 PSIG, 0-0.20" Water | eBay

The beauty of the Magnehelic design is that it is extremely rugged and if it appears to be out of calibration the most I have ever had to do is use the screw on the face to reset the pointer to zero. Even new the Magnehelic is less expensive than the Bacharach, of which I used to have one and thought it a POS.
 
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Old 02-24-17, 11:27 AM
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Thanks again, that makes a lot of sense.
I noticed that there is no tube coming out of that one, is it just a pipe or is
there something special about it? Maybe I should look for a new one with
the tube.
 
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Old 02-24-17, 11:59 AM
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The Magnehelic gauges have high and low pressure ports threaded for 1/8 inch pipe on the left side and the back. Plug the ports you do not use, leaving both a high and low port free. Use a hose barb fitting in the ports and rubber hose on the barb. Use the high pressure port to measure positive pressure and the low pressure port to measure negative pressure.

Since that particular model requires it to be vertical you will want to buy or make an angle bracket for it.

For combustion testing you will also need a smoke pump (oil fuel only) and a carbon dioxide (CO2) analyzer. I have to go out for several hours but I can advise you on these and other items if you so desire.
 
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Old 02-24-17, 07:45 PM
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I have a new smoke tester but not a CO meter, yes would appreciate a
recommendation.

I'm not following the hook up, If I attach a rubber hose, then do I also
need a small metal pipe to go into the combustion chamber for example
or outlet pipe?
 
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Old 02-25-17, 08:58 AM
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Here is a thread from 2008 you might find interesting. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/bo...-test-kit.html

I was going to suggest what is often called a "wet" kit but they seem to have been totally superseded by electronic analyzers. I don't know if you can even get the repair kits or the replacement fluids for the analyzers anymore, the last time I did one was probably more than twenty years ago.

Honestly, I have to agree with the gist of that linked thread, that unless you have several furnaces/boilers to check on a yearly basis it just does not pay for a homeowner to do his own combustion testing. It was shortly after the turn of the century that I donated all my combustion testing equipment to a historical museum as an example of old technology.

Yes, you need to use a soft rubber tube of sufficient length to reach from the draft meter to the combustion chamber and the exhaust outlet. A tube with 1/4 inch inside diameter and a probe of metallic tubing with 1/4 inch outside diameter about six to ten inches long for the probe. Ideally the probe should be stainless steel but copper is fine for occasional usage.
 
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Old 02-25-17, 02:18 PM
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I might start taking care of my furnace and hot water heater and also my parents, so obviously that is 4 burners. I don't think I've ever seen a tech measure and properly adjust the draft, so I thought that this is something that I can do.
I don't want to use a chemical test kit but I don't mind spending up to $500 on a decent, reliable, electronic unit. If I buy one the plan will be to tune these all up.

The first quote for a service plan was about $350 for my parents, then another person at the company told us on another call that there was a $279 plan that did not include the zone dampers or controller and so we went with that one. It is only on the furnace not the hot water heater. I could probably pay the equipment off in one year of not having a plan on any of the 4 burners.

I will take a look at that thread now.
 
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Old 02-25-17, 03:32 PM
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In about a week it will have been 12 years since I retired. I did not do combustion testing the last few years prior to retirement so my knowledge of what is available today is rather limited.

Twenty years ago a decent combustion analyzer (electronic) would cost more than $1,000 and adding a few "goodies" such as a printer or testing for NOx or SO[SUB]2[/SUB] would add a minimum of $100 to $200 per item. A higher quality analyzer could easily exceed $2,000. The sensor cells had a limited life, some as little as six months but some might be good for as long as eighteen months, depending on the number of tests. These sensor cells had a cost of around $60 for the least costly to maybe $150 for the most costly.

The other issue was calibration. ALL electronic gas analyzers advertise having internal calibration functions BUT if you reads the instructions you will see the manufacturer's also recommend laboratory calibration on a yearly or every other year basis. They especially recommend laboratory calibration when the sensor cells are changed as the error with new cells can be as high as +/- 20%. Unfortunately, the equipment to run the laboratory calibration will often cost another $300 or so AND the cost of the certified calibration gas. But it doesn't end there; some calibration gases, most noticeably carbon monoxide, has a limited shelf life and it degrades even in the cylinder in less than a year which means that you are constantly needing to buy new calibration gases.

Now maybe some, (or all) of these detriments have been overcome in the time that has transpired but I kind of doubt it. Hopefully my friend, Grady, will add to this thread.
 
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