Oil to Gas conversion

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  #1  
Old 02-26-19, 04:47 PM
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Oil to Gas conversion

Hello from NJ,
We just bought a Bi-Level house and has oil heating system with no central air. My nephew also has a ranch house with full finished basement and oil. Our boilers are different i have water heater attached to boiler and he has water heater on electric.
We are planning on conversion to gas and getting quotes. Some companies are saying that put 2 zone forced air system one and some says change the boiler and add central air. In both cases we have to install new duct work. The estimates we are getting is around 18K and if we just change boiler and add central air its coming to probably 1k less. Also most companies who is giving estimate is asking us to call someone else to remove the oil tank which will be extra cost. Some companies are saying you call your own plumber and electrician to pull the gas pipes and outlet for condenser outside.
Couple of questions
1. Is it right to remove everything and put 2 zone (2 systems - one in attic and one in basement or ground floor) forced air system.
2. Is this as high as 18K? We are also checking on NJ save energy program but nothing is clear as some companies won't do insulation which is mandatory for save energy program.
3. Most of the companies don't do Manual J and Manual D. Then how will they know the right system.
Its been a challenge but looking for right advise. Also I have heard from most that don't use Goodman but few have said its a good brand to use.
 

Last edited by s2kfixit; 02-26-19 at 04:47 PM. Reason: spell check
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  #2  
Old 02-26-19, 06:44 PM
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Changing the boiler to natural gas sounds like a good idea.
If you go that way..... install a natural gas water heater.

Installing a lot of ductwork is a big expense. I'm not sure I'd opt for that.
I'm thinking if the heating system is/was good..... just change the boiler and address the A/C separately. Look into ductless units.

The oil tank will be handled by a separate company.
Some HVAC contractors are licensed to run the electric and the gas.
Many are not licensed and do but shouldn't.

I'd highly recommend getting three different quotes.
 
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Old 02-27-19, 08:05 AM
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If the boiler is already zoned, I would replace the boiler & add A/C (1 system up & 1 down). I have always prefered to heat with a heating system & cool with a cooling system.
 
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Old 02-27-19, 09:40 AM
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Have you looked at Mini splits? Might be a 3rd option.
 
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Old 02-27-19, 02:57 PM
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Thank you so much PJmax, Grady, airman.1994
After doing some more research and looking at your comments I have come to conclusion that best is to keep it separate heating and cooling systems since we already have oil based boiler will plan to convert to natural gas boiler.
I have some more questions
1. Many professionals came and are giving quotes some recommend to replace with 85% AFUE as a cheaper option to go with. I inquired about high efficiency around 92% and they said its not worth it. Any suggestion?
2. I was also looking at High Efficiency Direct vent wall mount boilers. Any suggestions on brand and cost about that. Since I am already spending am ok to spend little more but not double. One heating and cooling company said it will be double the price and also i need special plumbing like motorized valve, separate system pump, DHW pump, expansion vessel, external low water pressure tank and valve etc. Any ideas or anything i can read about this system will be great before i decide.
Thanks,
S2K
 
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Old 02-27-19, 09:56 PM
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There are a lot of ways you can go and different systems. It's important to establish a rapport with a company you like and trust. Installation is the biggest and most important variable in the equation.

Everyone has their own ideas. Me...... I'd opt for a basic..... somewhat fuel efficient standard boiler. I would not choose a tankless wall mount. Too many problems. Expensive to repair. The companies that give you prices should be able to give you heating and cooling load calculations. They will be important in determining equipment sizes.

I'd definitely get a natural gas water heater. 40 gallon is usually good.
 
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Old 02-28-19, 09:43 AM
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If the oil fired boiler is relatively new (<10 yrs. old) and in good shape, you might be able to replace the oil burner with a power gas burner FAR cheaper than replacing the entire boiler. Carlin, Riello, & Beckett all make conversion burners.
 
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Old 03-03-19, 09:57 AM
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Some companies are saying you call your own plumber and electrician to pull the gas pipes and outlet for condenser outside.

Just my opinion, but if the contractor isn't licensed to install the gas piping and electrical I would expect them to subcontract it and supervise the work. I see no reason why you as the customer should have to be involved in anything with more than one legitimate and reputable contractor.
 
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Old 03-04-19, 05:09 AM
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Let me add my 2 cents. Most boilers that are used for hot water heating have a life expectancy of almost "forever" unless they crack a section or corrode inside or outside due to misuse or poor service, That said, unless you have a lot of money to waste I would convert the existing boiler to natural gas and add mini-splits for the A/C. AS far as a new high efficiency boiler, the best efficiencies are obtained by replacing the boiler and lowering the operating temperature of the circulating water. To accomplish this you usually have to increase the amount of radiation in each room to achieve the required BTU's necessary to heat that room with the lowered water temperature. This will add quite a lot of $ to the installed cost. Most good contractors will offer a package price for the conversion including the burner, wiring and the new gas line even if they have to sub out the gas line.This way you are dealing with only 1 company instead of many. PJ'S recommendation is spot on. In most cases simple is the better choice.
 

Last edited by Steamboy; 03-04-19 at 05:13 AM. Reason: more information
  #10  
Old 03-05-19, 05:53 PM
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Thank you everyone for great inputs. Finally I have decided to do the following
1. Replace the oil based boiler to gas based direct vent boiler.
2. Get a 50 gal hot water tank.
3. Install central air in attic as it is not needed on first floor and cool air goes down and if needed i can get split system on 1st floor.
Will talk to hvac companies to get quotes. Until now everyone has come with a quote of more then 15k. And I don't think it should be more then 10K total for replacing boiler and installing central air .
 
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