What are good practices for switching out a control board?


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Old 10-29-19, 06:00 AM
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What are good practices for switching out a control board?

I am about to switch out a furnace control board.

What are best practice steps one should follow for the transplanting work to be successful, to minimize the change of mistakes, risk of any injury and to verify afterwards everything is functioning properly?

What are good strategies to keep the wiring organized? Like for example, to label wires first, to take pictures, or switching out wires one-by-one?

Perhaps there any other good resources that forum members found helpful in this respect?

Thanks

 
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Old 10-29-19, 08:25 AM
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I turn the power off. Then I take pictures of the old board and it's wiring from several angles. If you want to label wires it doesn't hurt. Then I move one wire or connector at a time from the old board to the new one. If at any point you are confused stop and figure it out before you unhook more wires.
 
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Old 11-04-19, 09:44 AM
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"I turn the power off. Then I take pictures of the old board and it's wiring from several angles. If you want to label wires it doesn't hurt. Then I move one wire or connector at a time from the old board to the new one. If at any point you are confused stop and figure it out before you unhook more wires. " I agree with the previous comment. Pictures are your friend. Just make sure they are clear enough to make sense later on. Also draw out your own schematic. This helps you to identify tricky connections before they have been tampered with.
 
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Old 11-11-19, 07:03 AM
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Thanks. A followup question would be on how to test that everything works correctly afterwards?

I mean not only that the furnace just runs, but that all the safety functions work properly. For example, that the gas supply is cut off automatically in case the system detects a problem like the flame going out or the inducer motor failing.

I wonder if there is a airplane like check-list for those type of issues?
 
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Old 11-11-19, 07:19 AM
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Try and run the furnace with a safety open, or the flame sensor unplugged. It should not start/shut off with such a condition.
Ground yourself before handling the board out of the bag. Static electricity kills electronics.
 
 

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