Propane fittings. How can I connect these two fittings?

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Old 12-19-19, 08:30 AM
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Propane fittings. How can I connect these two fittings?

I think I have two fittings of different standards that I need to connect. For context, I have a huge propane tank that feeds my kitchen stove and that was also used for a heating stove. I did away with the stove but want to be able to connect a propane heater if the power goes out or if it's just too cold for my pallet stove to get the job done. The heater has fittings to go on a standard 20lb propane tank, and the fitting I want to connect it to is some sort of 1/2" tube fitting.

I don't know the names for these standards, but I imagine a female adapter coupling would do the trick. I could use some help knowing what to search for. I'm trying to avoid having to turn the gas off and unhook the fitting to bring it all down to the hardware store.

The first measurement is of the non threaded portion of the fitting. The second is of the threaded portion.

Thanks in advance for any help

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Last edited by PJmax; 12-19-19 at 06:26 PM. Reason: resized pictures
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Old 12-19-19, 10:22 AM
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I assume your propane tank has a regulator on it. What pressure does it output?

The regulator for your heater is an odd one. 10 psi is not used for most heaters. I've only seen 10 psi used on heaters NOT for indoor use. So, before setting up your heater for emergency use you need to make sure it won't kill you.

The next problem is your 10 psi regulator is designed to be hooked directly to a propane tank. You cannot hook it to your gas line if that gas line already has a regulator on it, probably at the propane tank. You may have to do more replumbing to have unregulated propane on your gas line... That also means all the gas line between your propane tank and where you want to connect the heater is able to withstand the much higher pressure. If you do that conversion you can't have anything else using that gas line.
 
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Old 12-19-19, 10:36 AM
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Thank you, Pilot Dane,
I don't know what the output pressure is. I will check if I can read it off the regulator out there. Lot's of snow of there right now

Would a regulator for indoor appliances generally have a lower pressure than 10?

It is not an indoor heater but I use it only in emergencies and with carbon monoxide detectors going. It is also a very open structure without anywhere for buildup.
 
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Old 12-19-19, 10:41 AM
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I would probably change the shutoff valve to one that is female.
 
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Old 12-19-19, 12:02 PM
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Most indoor appliances and barbecue grills operate at 10" wc which is only about 1/3 psi. So, HUGE difference between 10 psi and what most appliances need.

Most common on residential propane tanks is a regulator that drops the pressure down to 10" wc but there are other pressures (like at my house) so you need to make sure what regulator is on your tank. You also need to insure that the pressure matches what your heater uses.
 
 

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