carbon monoxide and low oxygen detector

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Old 09-24-20, 08:02 AM
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carbon monoxide and low oxygen detector

Hi, Anybody know of a good carbon monoxide and low oxygen detector alarm. I have a vent free heater in the garage and would like to be recommended one. Safety first right...

 
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Old 09-24-20, 08:45 AM
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Go to your local home improvement store. Most carry the Kidde line of products and they are the leading suppliers of detectors.

You can get straight CO, CO/smoke and CO/explosive gasses detectors.
As far as I know.... nothing low cost to measure low oxygen.
A straight CO detector would be most beneficial in your application. You can get battery only or battery/electric. I'm partial to the combo units and have several in my home as well as in many customers homes. I like the LED display to let me know it's working.

Kidde CO detector

A small amount of fresh air should always be allowed into a room using a vent free heater.
 
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Old 09-24-20, 09:00 AM
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The good news is your if your vent free heater is less than 20+ years old it has a low oxygen shutoff built in.
 
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Old 09-28-20, 08:47 PM
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"UL 2034 / CSA 6.19 approved alarms must adhere to the following alarm test points and minimum exposure times:
Note: Carbon Monoxide is measured and displayed in “PPM” or parts per million.
  • 0 – 29 PPM – The detector must remain silent. If it has a digital display, it must show a zero reading.
  • 30 PPM – 69 PPM – If the carbon monoxide level remains in this range for a minimum of 30 days, the audible alarm may sound. If the unit has a digital display, it should display the CO level provided it is 30 ppm or higher.
  • 70 PPM – 149 PPM – The alarm must sound when levels reach this range for between 60 – 240 minutes.
  • 150 PPM – 399 PPM – The alarm must sound if the carbon monoxide level remains in this range for between 10 – 50 minutes.
  • 400 PPM + – The alarm must sound if the carbon monoxide level remains at or above this level for between 4 – 15 minutes.""
Ref: How Standard Alarms Work ? CO Experts

UL approved co alarms do not provide protection from low levels.

At a minimum, get a unit with a digital display that allows you to check peak levels and reads down to 11ppm.

If you want real protection, get a co monitor. They cost a lot.
 
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Old 09-29-20, 05:15 AM
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Remember, those vent free open flame heaters are not supposed to be used in any space that has a car or other gasoline fueled devices or any stored flammable fuels and that when they are being used they produce a lot of water vapor that can raise the humidity level and cause things to rust.

This may not be the answer you are looking for but is a safety warning
 
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Old 09-29-20, 07:29 AM
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Anything with a flame should be at least 18" above the garage's floor. This goes for water heaters & furnaces as well. Gasoline vapors are heavier than air. Because of the gases density it cannot rise to the 18" height of the flame which helps reduce the chance of fire or explosion.
 
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