Cleaning impacted coil.

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  #1  
Old 06-01-02, 06:51 PM
trouser chili
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Cleaning impacted coil.

Ok well, I'm still a fairly new homeowner, and not too bright about upkeep of the HVAC system. Actually I wasn't too bright about it, I understand now. In anycase I never realized that my system even had an airfilter. When my old roomate removed it and told me it was all clogged up, I just figured "great, well now it's out and I'll get one in a couple of days". A year later my old airfilter was still sitting on the basement floor and the A/C is working very hard. doh.


To make this long story short, my interior coil is impacted with crud, most likely the blower as well. I had a HVAC company quote me a price a $350 to clean them both. I have no idea if this is a fair price. Can someone tell me? I have a 2 ton unit I believe. It's sized for a 1000 square foot house.

Also, I am an engineer so I like to feel I'm pretty handy and good at understanding things. I have decent if cramped access to to the coil and feel that I may be able to clean it myself. I also feel I may have the ability to remove and clean the motor as well, although I've never tried doing either of these things before. I've obtained some "Web" brand coil cleaner from Home Depot in a green pressurized can. It foams when you spray it. I have the feeling this isn't the best or the most powerful stuff I could use, but I wouldn't know what to use otherwise. Any suggestions on cleaning solutions?

Thanks much for any and all advise!
 
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  #2  
Old 06-02-02, 10:47 AM
PHnd
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The price you received for cleaning is not bad at all. You'd be better off having it done professionally. If done right, the complete system will be checked out and dialed in once the cleaning is complete. As for the foam cleaners, that's marketing and not the hot ticket. The store bought products are not strong enough and the commercial grade products, if not used properly, can cause damage beyond repair.

Could you do it yourself? Sure you could. Can you do it without causing additional or future problems is the question. The odds are against you. There's to many stones, to the untrained eye, that will be left unturned.
 
  #3  
Old 06-02-02, 07:07 PM
trouser chili
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Thank you. I assume that is a good price if the interior coil is actually removed and cleaned, instead of cleaned in the vent. They gave me the impression that they would be cleaning the coil in the vent but I'll clarify. I had a feeling the store bought can wasn't the real powerful stuff, and more of a light duty cleaner. Whenever somthing is advertised for it's "foaming action" I'm usually sceptical of it's actual ability to do what it's advertised as doing. Unfortunatly my coil is fairly well impacted. I thought of using oven cleaner, because I know it's very caustic and eats through just about anything, then I figured it would eat the coil as well. I guess I'm shopping for a good HVAC specialist that can provide a good cleaning. Any suggestions on what to look for in a proffessional? Should they belong to any specialized organization or anything?
 
  #4  
Old 06-02-02, 08:14 PM
PHnd
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Boy you'd be in deep doo if you had used oven cleaner. It doesn't like aluminum and I have no clue how it reacts to copper. As for finding someone, talk to the person you had look at it and maybe ask someone you know if they've had work done and did they like what they received for the money. You want someone who is comfident.

Hmm, cleaning through the vents. That must be duct cleaning and if so it will not properly clean your coil.
 
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