Gas Piping Open for Replies

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  #1  
Old 11-27-02, 09:24 PM
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Gas Piping Open for Replies

Agreements and disagreements.

Who should be allowed to do GAS PIPE work?

We all know there is danger involved when dealing with gas pipe repairs and installations.

I feel if one has not got a clue how to determine size of gas pipe, what BTU's are required for appliances, how to properly test gas pipeing, assemble gas pipeing. They should NOT be messing with it.

Should a home owner that knows nothing about the subject do there own GAS PIPEING work work?

At what limitations?

Things can go wrong and you don't want it to go wrong with GAS Pipeing.

Thought and Views are welcome.
 
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  #2  
Old 11-27-02, 09:59 PM
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As a licensed plumber and having seen some dangeous piping jobs done by homeowners, usually working out of a book or from advice from the local HomeDepot. I feel only trained individuals who know how to size and the proper material needed to insure safety try to do any gas piping. You would not believe what i have seen ( such as a water hose to feed a gas grill). Remember if it leaks and explodes, it is not just your house or life you may be destroying.
 
  #3  
Old 11-27-02, 10:00 PM
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In My Professional Opinion

Hello: Plumber2000

Absolutely correct. Licensed plumbers who specialize in gas piping should be the only persons installing, repairing or altering gas piping. All codes must be met to insure safety etc.

Homeowners should allow only the professionals do this type of work for their property & personal safety. Handypersons and non specialized plumbers should not attempt or be doing this type of work either.

Same can be said for electrical installations and many types of electrical repairs. Including those on most appliances and air conditioning units.

We as moderators should always be aware of the fact that we have no idea who the person asking the question is. Their personal capabilities and limitations cannot be evaluated.

There is simply a time for each of us to determine what we can do and may not be able to do. Paying a professional often is the best unseen investment we can make for safety & piece of mind.

When there is any doubt or a person does not have total understanding of what they are doing with either gas or electric, they should consider hiring a professional.

I certainly would not perform a dental procedure on myself nor would I want a plumber to perform one on me either....
Would you call me when you had a toothache....

HIRE A PRO. Worth every penny paid.
 
  #4  
Old 11-27-02, 10:12 PM
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Weeding

Mother nature has a cure for this.......Natural selection! What better means to weed out these idiots from the gene pool.
 
  #5  
Old 11-28-02, 03:51 AM
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About 15 years ago the city I lived in asked for opinions on the same question, only relating to all plumbing, heating, and electrical work. My response is basically:

If you don't know what you're doing and don't take the time to learn, then most anything can be life threatening. That's why permits and inspections are required. My hobby is buying houses that need a lot of work, fixing them up, and selling them; you should see some of the handiwork I've seen over the years! If people would just pull permits, most of the life threatening things could be eliminated. If they don't pull permits, all the laws in the world won't stop them. And it's not just us homeowners; as an architect, I've seen contractors do things that will scare you half to death, too.

In one of the cities I own a duplex in, the city says a licensed contractor has to do any type of work; the non-resident owner cannot do anything. When I talked to them about this, they said that, technically, I had to hire a licensed contractor to replace a door knob! Yeah, that's gonna happen all right. My argument with them was that there was going to be less maintenance because it was going to cost landlords more money and the overall quality of housing will go down. In fact, quality has been dropping enough that the city has now started random housing inspections on rental properties; I'm sure it isn't all due to this, but it has to have an effect.

To sum it all up, I feel homeowners should be able to do their own work. We just need to continue to encourage people to learn something about what they are about to start and PULL PERMITS. We also need to suggest that people hire a professional when we think they are in over their head.

Bruce
 
  #6  
Old 11-28-02, 05:37 AM
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As I had said in another post novices should not be doing gas piping or electricial work for that matter. That said however there is no magic in doing gas piping correctly for a DIYer who takes the time to do his homework. And that can be said for any project around the house.

There's plenty of info at the libarary to learn how to do it right and nobody is going to stop the idiot who doesn't care to learn, just as Bruce stated above.

As an aside I think gas piping is a safer job then electrical for the DIYerand here's why

If you mess up your piping you'll smell the leak before you blast your house off the foundation and turn it into toothpicks but with elecrical it's quite possible to wire up a light switch incorrectly and it just sits there waiting for you to touch it and electrocute you.

I use both of these extreme examples because the DIYer does need to realize what can happen if either job is not done correctly

Mike
 
  #7  
Old 11-28-02, 06:16 AM
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I fully agree with Mike134.
I've done most all of my gas piping, electrical, plumbing etc. for many years, but I like to think that I mostly know what I'm doing.
If I have the slightest doubt, I call a pro to do it, and learn by watching them.
When advising others in here, it is impossible to determine their skill level. They should either carefully follow the step-by-step advice of pros in here, OR call a pro.
Mike
 
  #8  
Old 11-28-02, 07:18 AM
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It was just on the news, seen that house blow up, and they had the evcauate several houses do to a GAS LEAK, scray ****. All it takes is a spark and KABOOM.


As a plumber I respect Gas, or any type.

Pesonnally if I knew nothing about gas piping and was my own home, I would not attempt this on my own. I would not want to be the one to be responsible if my house was to go up in a blast.

There is a certain amount the threads screwed into a fitting, sure we all know it has to be tight, but seen pipe threaed into the fitting all the way in, can you see a problem, I can.

What is the problem I talk about?

Yep you guessed it, the fitting will crack, and even if you don't see it and even if it tested ok, it can creat a hair line crack in the future. Even if it did not show on the test, does it mean it will not crack?

Then there is expansion and contraction that will take place.

Now you have unqualified homeowners who know something, know to get a permit and know it must pass an inspection.

They put it all together, put it under test, guess what line does not hold the test, it leaks. humm.... either they did not use enough thread sealer and not tight enough.

This was hard enough to put this together now they have to break it all down. or use a union, most will break it all the way down to the spot, and even some might think they can tighten it up with it all together, sure way not, if it works and holds after that, why won't it be good for years to come. I would not stake my home on it.

When we have DIYS come in here asking advice to install gas pipeing, I simply will not allow this type of advice take place, I don't know who they are if they have a permit, surely I don't want to hear on the news about anyhouse that blew up cause of gas pipeing and ti think we offer that advice on here.

So I say this, only quafified persons should do this work, unless you know eveything there is to know about it.
 
  #9  
Old 11-28-02, 10:28 AM
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Depends on the Homeowner.
I personally have installed my own gas lines but would not recommend it for the typical DIY person.
The type of person asking how it should be done shouldn't be doing this type of work, plain and simple.
It's one of those things either you know or you don't.
 
  #10  
Old 11-28-02, 02:06 PM
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There was a time I would help someone with gas work. Not anymore, my conscience would bother me to much if I just forgot to mention anything that I normally do and just forget to write it down. It's one thing to do the work, but another to tell someone, especially in written form, everything he/she needs to know or look for to do a fairly simple job.

We see a wide experience level of people here, but we can only determine their skill level through what they write. I know master plumbers who are hardly literate, but they know everything about plumbing. I know engineers that are just plain ignorant about tools and there usage. We have to determine if someone can do a job that can literally kill them with a bad connection, by what they write. I know I'm repeating myself.
But once again, I will not give out gas work answers again except "call a local licensed plumber / gasfitter and have the work professionally done".

I'm off my soap box....
 
  #11  
Old 11-28-02, 03:49 PM
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Well, as to gas, the homeowner is responsible for his home and his family,... if he blindly goes in and works on gas then the consequences will be his to deal with... but gas isnt as scary as what people make it... The smell was added for a reason... you will usually detect a gas leak LONG before it causes a serious problem... and gas expands VERY quickly when not under pressure, so a VERY small amount of gas has a BIG smell... so as long as a homeowner knows how to turn off the gas at the meter in an emergency then go for it... if you say he can't work on his own gas pipe, then what about changing his own brake shoes on his car?

As to pulling permits... permits in my opinion are a money scam and a racket... While some plumbers might make an occasional mistake that might get a job failed, it is rarely a life-threatening mistake.... So the ONLY people that get hassled by inspectors are REAL plumbers who know what they are doing to begin with and have a plumbing license... So while plumbers are out buying permits and turning every one day job into a 2 day job so some inspector who couldn't make it as a plumber can come in like Barney Fife and impress me with his book knowledge and laser level, the handymen of the world are out screwing up the plumbing of the world and never getting a permit or dealing with an inspector...

By the way, my grandfather was in the news in Atlanta 2 times in 10 years for blowing 2 different houses off the foundation with a gas-line...
 
  #12  
Old 11-28-02, 04:34 PM
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Ragner....You couldn't pull a response out of me right now. You've said it all...

Does plumin' run in your family?
 
  #13  
Old 11-28-02, 04:37 PM
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I homeowner can work on his own stuff, but better know what there doing.

So Ragnar, do you perform all you work without a permits?

As far as inspectors in this area, there all licensed and had to be working in the field for 5 years prior to taking the inspector exam, there not plumber rejects here, and they must keep the JP license up to date, of no more inspector.

Sounds like you have a great place to live, easy to get a license to do anything you want.


Here we have to do Continued Ed Classes every two years, or no license renewal.

Permits are a must, without permits and inspections, we still would be looking at plumbing install by ranch hands form the 20's.

Straight tee, water fitting in the drainage system, hard true 90, dead end pipe, no vents, but if you like seeing this type of work being done by homeowners alike, then go on and think permits are all a scam.

I'm glad to live in an area that has great guidlines when it comes to plumbing. Without these, I'd quit the plumbing trade and move on, cause I hate dealing with lousy plumbing installations.

Codes enforce the installation standards, with out them this would be a dangerous place the live.

Plumbers are protecting this nations health, were the ones that ensure waste and potable water flow in the correct manor.

So do you still not believe in the permit system?
 
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Old 11-28-02, 04:55 PM
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First, to lefty.... Yes, I am a third generation plumber... I have seen my grandfather AND my father escort inspectors back to their truck...

To Plumber2k... If you no longer had a plumbing license and could not pull permits but you still needed to do plumbing to feed your family, would you start doing healh-endangering, shoddy, life-threatening work simply because you didnt have an inspector to hold your hand? The RULES of Plumbing are fine.... and I do code work all day every day... I pull permits as necessary... but my point is... A permit or lack thereof is NOT what determines the quality of my work... My CONSCIENCE is what makes me do top quality work that is safe and healthy... I dont need an inspector to come out and tell me whether my plumbing is leaking or not, because if i test a job out and there is a leak (which is rare), I fix it... Inspectors would only be beneficial to some handyman guy who doesnt know or doesnt care about his work enough to keep from doing something dangerous or just plain non-functional and he is the guy that WONT get hassled by an inspector because he didnt pull a permit to begin with...

And while I have met a few inspectors that seemed to legitimately want to see a safe funtional job, I have seen many many many more who would rather just try and prove how smart they are by finding something to criticize... I once replaced a gas water heater for someone because the first person they had install it installed it SIDEWAYS because it wouldn't fit in the crawlspace... So I get a permit because the homeowner is now worried about getting bad work, so when the inspector comes in, he wants me to insulate the pipes over the heater to keep heat loss to a minimum... Of course, I convinced him otherwise, but the point is, that knucklehead gets paid 300 bucks for installing a non-heating sideways water heater, and then i try to do the right thing and get a permit to install it correctly and I am the one getting hassled...
 
  #15  
Old 11-28-02, 05:44 PM
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No I would not do shabby work, and would do it properly, only cause I know what needs to be done.

Not all work needs a permit, repair work hardly needs permits, water heater installation needs permits, at least here it does, there I don't know.

But I would get a permit if needed.

Sorry if inspectors have stired you wrongly in the past.

You always have the right to question the inspectors findings.
 
  #16  
Old 11-28-02, 05:45 PM
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Is a garage door opener a DIYer job??

Most certainly you'd say yes and be willing to give out info yet around 2 years ago a 12 year old boy in Chicago was electrocuted from a metal garage door because the recepticle the DIYer wanted to plug in the garage door opener didn't have a ground so he used one of those 2 slot adapters. Unfortunatly a wire inside the unit came loose energerzing the entire door and sadly a child was killed.

So you see you can stand on a box and say gas piping is WAY to dangerous to give out info on yet there's plenty of other ways/trades to have DIYers get hurt yet this web site exists for helping those that want to do it the right way gas piping INCLUDED.

Thanks for listening
 
  #17  
Old 11-28-02, 05:55 PM
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Well Mike thats fine a dandy, but I will not and will delete posts relating to installation of gas pipe on this forum. You want to help help electricuit someone and help in some type of work a DIY has no knowlegde of is fine, but take it to another forum, it's not going to happen on here.

Ron
 
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Old 11-28-02, 05:57 PM
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Hey, but back to the discussion about gas... The gas leaks you hear about on the news that blow up houses and cause evacuations are RARELY ever something a homeowner created... I would be willing to bet you that it was a main that was broken through some work getting done by a professional outside.... The outside gas pressure can be very high, the inside gas pressure past the regulator is only about 1/2 of a pound... 1/2 a pound of gas can cause major trouble if something just breaks loose, but a little hair line crack might take hours or even days to build up enough gas to cause a problem... Plenty of time for the homeowner to call the fire department, or the gas company or just to go out and turn the meter off...

And frankly the way that I learned about gas was by being taught by someone... I dont think it is safer to refuse advice to someone who might be intent on doing his own gas work regardless... I might be the one that gives him the right tip that keeps him from doing something very wrong... And is educated homeowner is the safest of all...

Finally, how can we somehow rule out gas as dangerous but feel okay about telling someone how to solder or connect a water heater? I do plumbing for a living and I have seen lead blow out of a pot and put guys in the hospital, I saw a guy get half his ear ripped off with a sledgehammer, I knew a guy that tore off 6 of his 8 finger nails with a pair of castiron chain cutters... My father got 32 stitches in him arm by picking up a toilet that had a hairline crack in it and it broke in his hands... I saw someone burn through his own torch hose and nearly caught a chemical storage shed on fire with the ensuing "torch snake"... Not to mention the countless times places have been flooded or burned down due to carelessness... Gas is certainly dangerous, but plumbing isn't all-together the safest trade around... The best thing we can do is give the diy'ers the best help we know how so that the work can be done in the safest way possible...

*steps down off his soapbox*
 
  #19  
Old 11-28-02, 06:05 PM
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Still gas pipe installation help should be keep on the local level not on here.

What will happen if a DIY comes in here and someone who knows nothing about it, says, sure cut the pipe with the sawsall but forgot to mention the danger involved, not only that, there was no mention of shuting the gas off.
 
  #20  
Old 11-28-02, 06:18 PM
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Well, when it comes right down to it, I dont think any of the plumbing that people are attempting should be done without the help of a professional... Even the simplest of plumbing jobs can turn ugly very quickly... Something seemingly simple like changing washers in a stem can be downright difficult and frustrating when you have stems that strip or break or handles that wont come off or water valves that wont shut off,... it is really foolish to think that I can give the experience of my last 15 years to someone who has been trying plumbing for 2 days... It even goes against my grain to help them because I make a living doing plumbing and by helping people do their own for free, I am hurting other plumbers out there... But the bottom line is... DIYers by nature are going to try and do the job whether they get advice or not... If we refuse them help, then they will take those gas lines apart by trial and error... Some because they are intent on doing their own work to learn how to do it, some because they have no respect for the trade and think it is all easy, and still others simply because they can't afford plumber's wages to have a pro come out... That being the case, I will help them to whatever extent I am able and I wish them the best but will take no liability whatsoever for any problem that may arise... But out of respect for your opinion, since you are the moderator of this forum, I will refrain from helping with gas-related issues...

Peace out...
 
  #21  
Old 11-28-02, 06:27 PM
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Have a good one Ragnar,

Thanks for all your input.

Catch you on the flipside of things.
 
  #22  
Old 11-28-02, 07:01 PM
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you asked

What will happen if a DIY comes in here and someone who knows nothing about it, says, sure cut the pipe with the sawsall but forgot to mention the danger involved, not only that, there was no mention of shuting the gas off.


That's why each forum has a moderator to delete those kinds of answers but I'd bet you very seldom get someone who knows nothing giving out answers.
 
  #23  
Old 11-28-02, 07:10 PM
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Thats where your wrong Mike, there are plenty that come in here and give improper answers.

I'm here to correct them if need

You want to run this forum, just say so, I'll be more then happy to let you have it.

I don't get paid for this.
 
  #24  
Old 11-28-02, 07:47 PM
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Mike134, you hit the nail right on the head of what I was saying. You are trying to help someone, but you just forget to write something down that is very basic.
Homeowner doesn't turn gas off because it wasn't written down. He's reading what our posts say. Minor mistake on our part, high hazard on his and he doesn't even have a clue.

I don't think we should be giving out infomation that evens go that far in regards to gas work.

Ragner, you want to give the guy that has the problems with a faucet washer infomation on gas work a week later when he asks about his water heater?
I understand your point of view totally. I too used to give out all kinds of info. I got into a personal debate with a guy claiming to be a contractor in Maine wanting to run gas to a garage and wanting second opinions. He was an idiot and I hope he is still alive. Everyone makes mistakes, as Plumbpro2000 and Oldguy have pointed out to me. (Oldguy and Tom Bartco has helped me more than once with people and Q&A, when people read something they don't want to hear), but the good feeling of helping people out, when you recieve private e-mail of thanks, far outway the bad stuff. This is a great site for the D-I-Y'er, but I have put limits on what I will impart.

I understand the point of view about electrical work also, probably ought to talk to the electricians though. All trades have hazards of one kind or another, but when someone asks a question that may (MAY) harm them, I feel that we should have some sort of answer that will give them the best help. They may not want to hear the answer, but it will be the best advice.
 
  #25  
Old 11-28-02, 08:32 PM
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Plumber 2000 I can tell your fur is starting to stand up and that's not my intention.....Your not wanting to help DIYer with gas is understandable because it can be dangerous but what I'm trying to say it is no more dangerous than any Electricial work or some of the other forums that people turn to advise for. For example in one of the other forums Someone asked if they could take out the main bearing beam in there house for "just 15 or 20 minutes" to change it to steel. Just from that kind of question you know he has no business trying it.

There are times in the Electrical forum when DIYer's are told there in over there heads and I just feel to make a blanket statement that ANY gas piping is beond the scope of ANY DIYer is just not correct.

Thanks for posting my opinons

Mike
 
  #26  
Old 11-28-02, 09:13 PM
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I never said it was beyond there scope for DIY'ers to do GAS Pipe, I'm just saying the advice they need should be keep locally, you can bet if a DIY would to call a local plumber by phone and get the scoop on something that needs to be done they would be more then happy to help them.

Advice given on here can be taken the wrong way, codes can be very strict and one could not possible explain it all via this forum.

Now the only advice i would give on Gas Piping on here would be questions related the the code, when a DIY does ask a question related to the code, and I mean there is a referance code # in question. at least I would know he has an indepth perciption of what he/she is dealing with. but to flat out try to explain to someone comming in here asking how to size?, how to hang?, how to seal?, how to test?, what type of pipe needed?, can I use copper?, can I use PVC?, what type of pipe dope?, do I need a permit?, thread depths?, what type of guage to test with? and there is alot more then just that to know, they don't know and understand what a drip leg is, where to put them, when to reduce in size.

And you can bet if unless there highly skilled in math, there not going to beable to read the chart for sizing, and they might just install all the pipe in 1/2" to all the fixtures.

It's those DIY's that should not be attempting such a task, and should be looking for help locally.

DIY's asking how do I install a gas line to my new stove, is a vast question, and it's not just splicing in a tee and running the line to it, there is caculation that has to be done.

This is why anyone asking about gas pipe installation should be referanced to there local area plumbers/pipe fitter or plumbing dept.

Now I'm not saying we can't answer a simple question like how to replace a gas valve, or hook up the gas flex supply to an appliance.

It's about the installation of gas pipe, the alteration of a gas line, adding to a gas line. It's this that concerns me.
 

Last edited by Plumber2000; 11-29-02 at 06:17 AM.
  #27  
Old 11-29-02, 01:47 AM
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Cool

You guys have said it all. Gas and electrical are far too dangerous for most would-be DIYers.
I grew up in the East Texas oil field, was an oil and gas pipeline company roustabout for a couple of summers while in college, and learned to work on gas lines (non-pro) because almost everybody had natural gas heating, cooking, etc. there.
However, I never give gas piping advice in here. I always refer all to Tom Bartco in the Gas Appliance forum, the resident gas pro, who always gives a very detailed answer OR tell them to seek pro help.
Same with electrical. Unless it is something very simple, I will not give electrical advice in here. I always refer them to the pros in the Electrical forum.
I'm not a pro at any of this, and I make enough mistakes on everything else. LOL But the pros keep me straight.
We're all just trying to help others. That is how I learned, and how the people seeking advice will learn. I learn things in here almost every time that I come in.
Mike
 
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Old 11-30-02, 02:53 AM
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So it sounds like there will be no help on gas piping and, possibly, electrical either. I think that's really a shame. The flip side of all this, though, is that you may save a DIY'ers life or his family's life by answering a question.

I understand where everyone is coming from. Every time I see someone try to explain how to tell if a wall is bearing or what size beam to use, I just cringe. I don't think you could ever tell a person how to install an entire piping or electrical system, nor do I think you should try. But I sure don't see any reason for not helping someone install a gas appliance.

Incidently, Plumber200 mentioned something about sizing gas pipe. In Minnesota it is illegal for anyone except a licensed engineer to size piping in anything except exempt (i.e. residential and some very small commercial) buildings; the law is there to protect the life, safety and welfare of the public.

Bruce
 
  #29  
Old 11-30-02, 05:36 AM
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The flip side of all this, though, is that you may save a DIY'ers life or his family's life by answering a question.

You do bring up a good point Bruce. Plus the industry is making it easier for the DIYer to try and do things himself. I was in a housing development last week and there they bring the incoming gas to a manifoid were it had 5-6 ports that they then run flexable gas lines clear across the house. Not to slight my trade however extension cords (I.E.) Romex was run throughout. I guess though that talk about the lack of craftmanship belongs in a new post......
 
  #30  
Old 11-30-02, 09:11 AM
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Plumber2000:
Are you being asked questions that you are uncomfortable answering?
Sometimes we have to make judgement calls as to what depth advice is given.

Here is a quote from a previous post.
I mean no disrespect to the poster, but use it as an example of what lengths people would go to DIY.

"The line is 3/4 all the way from the meter and seems to have lots of pressure, ( I can feel the gas blow on my hand quite strong) since I do not have a gas flow meter, this is the only test i have. "

So to answer your question I would have to say that in the majority of cases unqualified persons should not be doing piping or similar work.
Having said that, I also feel that if someone is hell bent on doing that sort of work that at least we can send them in the right direction.
Maybe we could advise that copper pipe works better than garden hose to hook up a barbeque.
 
  #31  
Old 11-30-02, 03:28 PM
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gas line

obviously certified contractors should run the gas line. as far as i know only plumbers and hvac contractors are certified to pull permits and do this work here in georgia. of course a lot of this is subbed out, and then where does the responsibility go? jethro and his brother will do it for $35 a drop, it is scary how much work they get.
 
  #32  
Old 11-30-02, 05:42 PM
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Are you mechanicaly inclined, have you read and searched for the proper info to do the job, have you applied for the proper permits, do you have someone that can advise you on the job? If so do it and do a good job. You may do it better than some of those so called pro's that do not take pride in their job.
 
  #33  
Old 11-30-02, 08:42 PM
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I've had some experince while working at Home Depot people coming in and asking for advise for gas piping... I won't do it unless they know what they are doing, and feel safe with it..

Minor work, I think a person should do.. but a whole house.. No.. I had a guy who was going to run 1" gas line from a 1 1/4" line for his stove! i said that is way too big! He was going to run new line for his stove with about 30'.. I told him best to call in a HVAC guy or a Plumber..
 
  #34  
Old 11-30-02, 08:49 PM
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Hello: Plumber2000

Amazing. Interesting too. Hummm?

I dropped "My Two Cents" in right after you posted the question and now it's gone...........

On the side of the plumbers and pros only doing gas piping.

HUMMMM......?????

Still on their side but wondering where my posting is...?????

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  #35  
Old 12-01-02, 02:31 AM
fjrachel
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Many pros and cons on this subject of who should or shouldn't do gas piping or anything else in the home that may be dangerous. But the bottom line is the homeowner, in the 20 states I've worked in, is allowed by law to do basicly anything they want within the home, without any type of permit.
 
  #36  
Old 12-01-02, 05:35 AM
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Checkout the plumbing forum for a continuarion of this debate...about 22 responces so far.......
 
  #37  
Old 12-01-02, 11:39 AM
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Hello: Mike134

You bring up a excellent point.
"I guess though that talk about the lack of craftmanship belongs in a new post......"

This entire thread and the one posted in the heating and cooling forum is an interesting topic and good question for discussion.

However, it belongs in the Chats & Whines forum. That forum was opened for this expressed purpose.

Debates, chats and open discussions between pros are good to have for an understanding and a knowledge base. But does not serve a purpose in resolving problems for members, visitors or guests in need of help in a request for help forum such as this one.

Kindly post any generalized open for discussion topic in the Chats & Whines forum in the future. It makes an excellent forum for such.

Thanks,
Tom
 
  #38  
Old 12-01-02, 12:07 PM
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Tom.

When you made a reply it was locted in your Gas Forum, I had sent a copy of this post to that forum, for views.

For GregH

You Asked Me: Are you being asked questions that you are uncomfortable answering?

The answer is no. but concerned something bad will happen cuase someone on a DIY site will convence the poster it is the way to do it.

And I on the subject of Gas Pipeing, it shold be refered to the local area.

I can see the entire post has been moved.

Those who 1st read this, I started this in the plumbing forum, and I have made a rule to not answer gas pipe installation in there, and all answers in that forum will be refered to there local area. It beter they get the advice locally there then on the Plumbing Forum

Now if a DIY wants advice about this subject, there is a couple of other forums I have no control over.
 
  #39  
Old 12-02-02, 05:35 PM
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Hello: Plumber2000

I found it. As always, you were correct.

The topic was within my own forum.....

Right there under my own nose...LOL!.........oh well.

Exactly what happens when trying to be all over the web site and jumping into forums to perform some of the functions and operations required.

Confusion set in...

I have merged the two into this one.

Ron. Now the original topic is duplicated.

S*** happens....

If you like I can delete one of the originals.
Advise.

Thanks Ron
Tom_B
 

Last edited by Sharp Advice; 12-02-02 at 07:40 PM.
  #40  
Old 12-02-02, 06:06 PM
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I took care of the dupe post

LOL
 
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