A little Tip

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  #1  
Old 06-12-06, 04:28 AM
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A little Tip

Ok I learned this from watching tv don't know if it belongs here or chats and whines. but since it has to do with electric I will post it here.

its not the amps thats kills you its the current. Just 6 milly amps across the heart is enough to kill you.Think about that.
 
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  #2  
Old 06-12-06, 04:33 AM
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Your statement does not make sense. Current is measured in amps. Perhaps you meant to say, "Its not the voltage thats kills you its the current."
 
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Old 06-12-06, 04:35 AM
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yeah voltage thanks I'm not good at remembering things.

OK heres the correct version of the tip.

Its not the voltage that kills its the current. JUST 6 milly amps across the heart is enough to kill you.
 

Last edited by lexmarks567; 06-12-06 at 05:22 AM.
  #4  
Old 06-12-06, 09:34 AM
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The current (mA) will stop your heart, but voltage causes burns. Really both can cause serious harm to the body. Higher voltages burn not only the skin at contact, but the inside of the body as well. These internal burns usually result in limb amputation if the victim survives.

The real moral is that electricity is unforgiving in any form; always be safe.
 
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Old 06-12-06, 11:57 AM
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Originally Posted by ibpooks
The current (mA) will stop your heart, but voltage causes burns. Really both can cause serious harm to the body. Higher voltages burn not only the skin at contact, but the inside of the body as well. These internal burns usually result in limb amputation if the victim survives.

The real moral is that electricity is unforgiving in any form; always be safe.
Then why can you grab a Van de Graff generator and make all your hair stand up with about 100,000V applied to your body?

I thought the burns were from the current, as well.

Of course, it's the voltage that supplies the necessary current to break your skin's insulation and body's resistance. So, yes, both are significant. But the heat is in the current.
 
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Old 06-12-06, 12:56 PM
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ok, the corrected corrected version.......
about 100 milli Amps can put the heart in ventricular fibrillation.
May read slightly different amounts depending on where you read it, but about a 1/10 of an amp across the heart is generally considered enough to kill. 6 mAmps imbalance is what will activate a GFCI receptacle.
 
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Old 06-12-06, 02:07 PM
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The current (mA) will stop your heart, but voltage causes burns.
IP can you explain exactly how voltage burns?
 
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Old 06-12-06, 02:14 PM
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MAC more accuratly phrased what I was saying. Higher voltage permits more current to flow through the higher resistance parts of the body (Ohm's law). The flow of current through the resistance of the body causes heating and burning.

The point really was that "low voltage" does not necessarily mean safe.
 
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Old 06-12-06, 02:23 PM
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Originally Posted by ibpooks
The point really was that "low voltage" does not necessarily mean safe.
A very good point to make. I often here fellow worker say something like "and that was a 480 volt feeder" I have to ask, so how would it be different if it were a 120 volt feeder?

How would it be different if it were a 24 volt circuit?

Granted the higher voltage will force a higher amperage through the circuit. But once you are DEAD you are DEAD. How is DEAD AND ON FIRE going to make much of a difference to you.
 
  #10  
Old 06-12-06, 02:29 PM
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I have to say...

I was perfectly healthy until about 2 months ago. I was diagnosed with a heart AFib. It was fixed and hasn't returned (although it can at any time). The doctor's have no explanation for this, but 3 cardiologists have told me that yes a 110V shock could have done it.

Working live on some circuits months ago I rcvd. some shocks. 2 I distinctly remember being painful where they entered.

So yes... be careful guys you can end up doing to you what I did to me (or worse).
 
  #11  
Old 06-12-06, 06:54 PM
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From an OSHA chart on effects of electricity:

1 mA Perception level. Slight tingling sensation. Still dangerous under certain conditions.

5 mA Slight shock felt; not painful but disturbing. Average individual can let go. However, strong involuntary reactions to shocks in this range may lead to injuries.

6-30 mA Painful shock, muscular control is lost. This is called the freezing current or "let-go" range.

50-150 mA Extreme pain, respiratory arrest, severe muscular contractions. Individual cannot let go. Death is possible.

1000-4300 mA Ventricular fibrillation (the rhythmic pumping action of the heart ceases.) Muscular contraction and nerve damage occur. Death is most likely.

10,000 mA Cardiac arrest, severe burns and probable death.

100mA for 3 seconds = 900mA for .03 seconds in causing fibrillation

Wet conditions are common during low-voltage electrocutions. Under dry conditions, human skin is very resistant. Wet skin dramatically drops the body's resistance.

Dry Conditions: Current = Volts/Ohms = 120/100,000 = 1mA
a barely perceptible level of current

Wet conditions: Current = Volts/Ohms = 120/1,000 = 120mA
sufficient current to cause ventricular fibrillation


Note that a difference of less than 100 milliamperes exists between a current that is barely perceptible and one that can kill.
 
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Old 06-13-06, 01:12 PM
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Gee, there sure is a lot of variety of info out there on the effects. Here is a quote from another web site.

"The current range of 100- to 200-ma, is particularly dangerous because it is almost certain to result in lethal ventricular fibrillation."

I guess the OSHA info is probably the best, but who really knows?
 
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Old 06-13-06, 02:03 PM
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I once had a guy that worked for me get across 440V @ 400hz. Fortunately for him it knocked him away from the source. However, he literally vibrated from uncontrolled muscle spasms for a couple of days. We thought it was kind of funny at the time (our young and stupid era). The guy carried the nickname d*^do for as long as I knew him after that.
 
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Old 06-14-06, 08:54 PM
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No doubt it kills, and 120 VAC kills more people each year than any other voltage.. Its in every home.

Don't ever take any shock lightly, If you need to sit down and regroup after any encounter, GO TO THE HOSPITAL !

It may seem minor but internal burns are nothing to mess with.

AND ALWAYS ALWAYS (not a typo) Treat the ckt as if it was energized.
 
  #15  
Old 06-15-06, 04:39 AM
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Now that there are plenty of qualified remarks to this I will move it to C&W so people that don't frequent the electrical forum may learn something eye opening.
 
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