Mind Was Wandering Today

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  #1  
Old 06-06-08, 06:17 PM
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Mind Was Wandering Today

Out of the blue today, as I was sitting at a traffic light watching my gas guage go down, I got to thinking about a funny movie (Blazing Saddles) and it got me thinking about one saying, which lead to another thought and so on......

What is the origination of the following saying - "What in the Sam Hill is going on here"

The other phase that popped up was - "What in Tar-Nation is going on here" (excuse the spelling if incorrect)

I couldn't think of the origin of these statements. Any Clue? or have any others that your were curious about
 
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  #2  
Old 06-06-08, 11:36 PM
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Euphemism Sam Hill is considered a soft replacement for hell or damn.

Used in 19th century America by frontiersmen, especially when they needed to clean up their language in the presence of ladies.
First used in print in 1839; in America, Seattle Newspaper. Jim Hill, the legendary "empire builder", whose railroads, including the Great Northern, remained his last monument, was a man given to notable rages when anyone dared to oppose one of his grandiose schemes. So frequent were these tirades, that the paper carried as a standing headline: "Jim Hill is as mad as Sam Hill.." Other phrases include "go like Sam Hill" or "run like Sam Hill".

There is a story sometimes told (for example in Edwin Mitchell’s Encyclopedia of American Politics in 1946) that one Colonel Samuel Hill of Guilford, Connecticut, would often run for political office at some point in the early nineteenth century but always without success. Hence, “to run like Sam Hill” or “go like Sam Hill”. The problem is that nobody has found any trace of this monumentally unsuccessful candidate.
On the other hand, an article in the New England Magazine in December 1889 entitled Two Centuries and a Half in Guilford Connecticut mentioned that, “Between 1727 and 1752 Mr. Sam. Hill represented Guilford in forty-three out of forty-nine sessions of the Legislature, and when he was gathered to his fathers, his son Nathaniel reigned in his stead” and a footnote queried whether this might be the source of the “popular Connecticut adjuration to ‘Give ‘em Sam Hill’?” So the tale has long legs.
The expression has been known since the late 1830s. Despite the story, it seems to be no more than a personalised euphemism for “hell”.


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Old 06-06-08, 11:54 PM
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Tarnation is a euphamism for damnation. Not much info on that one.
 
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Old 06-07-08, 10:00 AM
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"Used in 19th century America by frontiersmen, especially when they needed to clean up their language in the presence of ladies."

Interesting stuff.....can you imagine todays band of missfits (youths) "cleaning up their language" for the ladies? Hardly.

When I was young, I was taught to repect others, say please, call someone sir or mame, hold doors open for ladies, offer my seat on the bus to a female if they were standing, and a whole bunch of other gentlemanly things to do.

Someone thought I was out of my mind yesterday when I offered to let them pass in front of me at the register in a supermarket. They had 4 items, I had a basket full. They went ahead of me, but never said thank you....where have we gone?
 
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Old 06-07-08, 10:32 AM
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Yea. I don't think that's what the founding fathers meant by freedom of speech. Damn courts. I would have no problem with reasonable decency laws. And I can cuss like a sailor, cause I was one. But I keep it in the locker room, so to speak.
 
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Old 06-07-08, 10:41 AM
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This is stupid I know, but when I think of "what in Tar Nation", I think of Yosemite Sam!
 
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Old 06-07-08, 10:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Shadeladie View Post
This is stupid I know, but when I think of "what in Tar Nation", I think of Yosemite Sam!
Hah. You're right.
 
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Old 06-08-08, 06:17 PM
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Czizzi, so you were the guy in the front of the traffic line that let it change lights 3 times. Glad your mind "wandered" back!!
 
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Old 06-08-08, 07:28 PM
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Nothing wrong with being gentlemanly and watching the language.

I switched over to saying "good grief" instead of gd or "drats" instead of s--t and the f word, well I just try to remove that one all together.

Hey if it's good enough for Charlie Brown and Dick Dasterdly it's good enough for me.
 
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Old 06-08-08, 09:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Mackey View Post
Nothing wrong with being gentlemanly and watching the language.

I switched over to saying "good grief" instead of gd or "drats" instead of s--t and the f word, well I just try to remove that one all together.

Hey if it's good enough for Charlie Brown and Dick Dasterdly it's good enough for me.
How about "ratlips"? I workied with a guy that used say that instead of other words like the one's you replaced.
 
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Old 06-09-08, 07:12 AM
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100 degrees in the shade today, and I have to install a weathervane on the top of a copula up on a roof of a outbuilding we repaired.

I may have to borrow a couple of reverse "Euphemism's" during the course of the day , somehow I don't think that "dag-nabbit" will appropriately convey the feeling of the burning sensation my feet may experience on a hot roof.

Although, Tar-nation may actually fit (pun intended).
 
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Old 06-09-08, 08:01 AM
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Sorta along the same line. Some of my dads favorite sayings. I'll bet everyone has a few in their family;
- you never know from where you sit, where the guy in balcony is going to spit.
- slipprier than snout on a Shoe Maker's Apron.
- cold enough to freeze the nuts off a brass monkey
and many others that I'm sure wouldn't last on the site!
 
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Old 06-09-08, 08:14 AM
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Ya know there actually was a "brass monkey". Its what the cannonballs were stacked on in the days of sail, and if it got cold enuf, it would shrink enuf for the cannon balls to spill out of their depressions. Or so the things I've seen say
 
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Old 06-09-08, 08:59 AM
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That's why it was originally "cold enough to freeze the balls off of a brass monkey".

"Slicker'n snot on a greezed apple", is the one I know.
 
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Old 06-09-08, 03:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
Ya know there actually was a "brass monkey". Its what the cannonballs were stacked on in the days of sail, and if it got cold enuf, it would shrink enuf for the cannon balls to spill out of their depressions. Or so the things I've seen say
always wondered about that one!! thanks for clearing it up.
 
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Old 06-09-08, 07:09 PM
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Oooh, OOooh, I thought of one. My grandmother always had "caniption" fits. And mom was always "sick and tired" of us doing certain things as kids.
 
  #17  
Old 06-10-08, 04:02 AM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
Oooh, OOooh, I thought of one. My grandmother always had "caniption" fits. And mom was always "sick and tired" of us doing certain things as kids.
The Urban Dictionary defines "Caniption" as - A restrained hissy fit
 
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Old 06-10-08, 06:48 AM
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Caniption is actually defined? Amazing
 
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Old 06-10-08, 07:06 AM
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well, thats the Urban Dictionary. Probably has "fo'shizzle" in there too.
 
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Old 06-10-08, 08:34 AM
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I had a harry caniption fit when the power went off & I had
to dig out the old generator--15 hrs. later finally back on line.
S**t happens..............................
 
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Old 06-10-08, 08:39 AM
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Originally Posted by j HOWARD View Post
I had a harry caniption fit when the power went off & I had
to dig out the old generator--15 hrs. later finally back on line.
S**t happens..............................
Wouldn't that be a hissy fit? Or is it somewhere in between?
 
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Old 06-10-08, 08:42 AM
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I knew a "Harry Coniption", I think he was a plumber, or was it electrician, or was it HVAC tech?
 
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Old 06-10-08, 08:47 AM
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It's worse than worst ( really bad )......................
 
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