Older than dirt

Reply

  #41  
Old 04-20-09, 04:53 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 8,629
Originally Posted by marksr View Post
Remember the glass or porcelain door knobs? and of course the front door took a skeleton key
With beveled cut glass in them.

...........................

Old rentals I have to work on have all that stuff that was mentioned.
 
Sponsored Links
  #42  
Old 04-20-09, 04:54 PM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 20,796
Heck, we had those in the 1st house we lived in in OH in '63 when my parents moved from CA. I think some were still there when we moved again in '72.

That was the same house with the coal furnace, upgraded with an auger that would last through the night. Load it in the morning, pull out the clinkers and drop 'em in the barrel, again in the afternoon, and just before bed.

Course, this was a house with loose stone foundation, and supporting timbers from tree trunks still with bark on them. The barn had 1895 scratched into the cement floor somewhere in the milking barn. We figured the house was older. Gorgeous wide thick trim, 10ft ceilings everywhere, cherry, walnut and applewood floors. Prob from the trees they cleared.

I'd live there in a heartbeat again, if it wasn't in OH.

btw...23 of 25 on the questions. I still have some Blackjack gum around here somewhere.
 
  #43  
Old 04-20-09, 04:57 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 8,629
Originally Posted by the_tow_guy View Post
My Great Grandma's house (Milwaukee) had a milk box that opened through, so the milkman put the milk in from the outside and she could get it from the kitchen. Our bottles were just set on the back porch.
And the bottles they delivered to my best friends folks house they'd leave them out all day in 90 degree weather and come home and the cardboard top was blown off and this tube snake of creamy foam was coming out the top.
 
  #44  
Old 04-20-09, 05:02 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 8,629
Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
btw...23 of 25 on the questions. I still have some Blackjack gum around here somewhere.
There was Clove gum, Teaberry gum and Beemans gum (which I really liked). Maybe you can still get it? But I no longer chew gum, out of fear of having old teeth sucked out of my head - and also giving myself a sore jaw that may not recover for 3 days.
 
  #45  
Old 04-20-09, 07:27 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,349
I'm not that old (58) but I remember everything on the list. My older brother had a Packard and that thing was a tank. We\hen we parted it out we saved the tranny and eventually put it in his Ford stepside pickup ('53 or '56 I don't remember) and the Packard Tranny was about three times the size of that old Ford box.

Pop bottles had a one penny deposit except for the large (quart?) size which were three cents. Canned pop (Shasta) was a dime at least until I was in my mid teens.

I still have a reel-to-reel tape recorder, a Teac 4300 or 4600. I haven't had it set up for at least a decade.

We had both mimeograph and spirit duplicators at my public schools. Copy machines didn't come into common usage until I was in college.

We had milk delivered at least once a week up through the '60s. Every once in a while my mother would have a bottle of chocolate milk delivered or a tub of cottage cheese. She left the delivery note and money in a metal Accent (meat tenderizer, aka MSG) can on the front porch. Imagine doing that these days. The milk bottles had paper stoppers and a paper cap crimped over the stopper. My older brother and I would take our asparagus and cram it in the outer caps and then toss it on the roof of the garage next door. I still can't stand asparagus.

We also had a neighborhood fish peddler. He drove around in an old panel truck (forerunner to the van) and sold from the back of the truck. This was back when Catholics couldn't eat meat on Fridays and while we weren't Catholic we still ate fish on Fridays. Sometimes he would have Dungeness crab (the BEST crab) and he would break the shell off the back (they were already cooked) and slurp out the guts. My mother said it was all she could do to keep from puking but it did lessen the amount of crab guts that went in the garbage.

Speaking of garbage...we had backyard pickup and there was no alley. The garbage collectors would haul around a huge can, about ninety gallon capacity I would guess, on their shoulder and could empty at least three standard cans before returning to the truck.

When he was in his early twenties my older brother wanted to race stock cars. We built a '50 Ford for the local track where the winningest car was a Hudson Hornet. The Hornet came stock with dual two-barrel carburetors but the organization rules didn't allow but one carburetor so the owner had to use an aftermarket manifold that took only one carb.

Yes, plenty of Studebakers also. The old bullet-nosed Studie was the only make of car my mother could identify. Even when I went to high school there were bullet-nosed Studies around.

As for those crappy push-button light switches...we never had them but they are common on many television shows. Buffy, 7th Heaven, and others that I don't recall right now. I hated those darn switches fifty years ago and I still hate them.
 
  #46  
Old 04-20-09, 10:43 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,532
Sometimes growing up in small town Arkansas in the 50's there was a bit of a time warp. No city garbage pickup and the couple (yes, husband and wife) who picked up our garbage in the fifties drove a two mule wagon. Even more time warped or perhaps third world the wagon had regular automobile wheels with pneumatic tires. Eventually though city regs for garbage vehicles put them out of business.
 
  #47  
Old 04-21-09, 08:36 AM
Beachboy's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Northeast Kansas
Posts: 732
I grew up on a farm in the 50's, and all my relatives farmed too, so we didn't have any city conveniences. I remember there was a "Watkins" man who came around every few months to sell the farm housewives vanilla extract and spices. Our mailbox was a half mile from the house, and it was the job of us kids to make the daily walk to pick up the mail, which included the newspaper, since there weren't any paperboys in the country. We didn't have trash haulers back then so we burned our trash in an old 55 gallon barrel. I loved dumping the trash, setting it on fire, and watching it burn! Maybe I was a budding pyromaniac....LOL! My parents "went to town" on Saturdays for groceries and whatever else we needed, and if we ran out of something, it waited until the next Saturday. It was unheard of to make a special trip to town for shopping. For social events, there wasn't much, but us kids had 4-H activities and the monthly school PTA which was mostly a community get-together, unlike the parent/teacher conferences of today. Oh yeah I went to one of the last surviving one room wooden school houses in the area, through sixth grade. Actually it was TWO rooms, grades 1-4 on the main floor and the basement was finished for grades 5-8. Some grades only had one or two kids in them.
 
  #48  
Old 04-21-09, 09:51 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 1,959
The house I grew up in didn't have push button switches but growing up in the hardware business and in an area with homes dating to the early 20th century near by we had to carry them and did so until by around the early 90's they had all been replaced.

We burned our trash into the 70's.In 1970 the city of Richmond annexed where we lived and that was the start of trash collection.
 
  #49  
Old 04-21-09, 11:53 AM
the_tow_guy's Avatar
Group Moderator
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: SW Fla USA
Posts: 11,515
How about rotary light switches. Remember those from Great Grandparent's house, too.
 
  #50  
Old 04-21-09, 12:50 PM
Beachboy's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Northeast Kansas
Posts: 732
Originally Posted by the_tow_guy View Post
How about rotary light switches. Remember those from Great Grandparent's house, too.
Yep, those rotary light switches with the white porcelain bases. Also the barebones ceiling lights consisting of a porcelain base with the yellow fabric/rubber covered twisted cord hanging down and attached to a simple brass socket.

How about the 32 volt Delco battery/generator systems used on many farms prior to WWII? We had an abandoned Delco genset when I was young which I promptly tore apart, honing my future engineering skills!

As a small kid, I remember my grandparents still having the old oak magneto style wall phone. I was WAY too short to reach it, so I never learned to make a call on it.
 
  #51  
Old 04-21-09, 05:33 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Jersey
Posts: 526
Originally Posted by marksr View Post
"Does anyone else remember the pushbotton light switches? My grandmother's house had a few of these"

Didn't everyone's grandparents have those type switches in their houses?
When you pushed in the top button [to turn on the light] it pushed out the bottom which you would push in when you turned the light out.

Remember the glass or porcelain door knobs? and of course the front door took a skeleton key
Yes, my Great Aunt's place at the shore had those push button switches along with open style coil spring bed frames and my Nana's house had those glass faceted door knobs.

Did anybody live at house that had a manual water pump like the kind in the old west movies???
I do remember an old house in my neigborhood that had one in the front yard and still worked!!!! They had it capped and closed sometime in the late seventies.
 
  #52  
Old 04-21-09, 05:41 PM
nap's Avatar
nap
nap is offline
New Member
Join Date: May 2006
Location: north
Posts: 4,163
Originally Posted by furd View Post
I'm not that old (58)

Dang your old furd!!!
 
  #53  
Old 04-21-09, 05:54 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Jersey
Posts: 526
"Varooom" handle grips that made a motorcycle sound when you twisted the grip.

Baseball cards in your spokes held by clothespins.

Banana seats and sissybars.

Rear slick bicycle tires tires.
 
  #54  
Old 04-21-09, 06:58 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
Salvaging parts from broken things to make down hill racing "cars". Rope steering, 4 different size wheels, and most of all not the least thought of putting brakes on it. Poor Bubba, he was the first to go down. Not the brightest bulb in the pack, either. Hair on fire, ten feet tall, and bulletproof!
 
  #55  
Old 04-22-09, 07:40 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 1,959
Schwinn Stingray with baseball cards in the spokes...yes sir!
 
  #56  
Old 04-26-09, 09:18 AM
Member
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Northern NJ
Posts: 19
I am older then dirt and proud of it!

1. Blackjack chewing gum No
2.Wax Coke-shaped bottles with colored sugar water Yes
3. Candy cigarettes Yes
4. Soda pop machines that dispensed glass bottles Yes
5. Coffee shops or diners with tableside juke boxes Yes
6. Home milk delivery in glass bottles with cardboard stoppers No to the cardboard stoppers yes to milk delivery
7. Party lines on the telephone No
8. Newsreels before the movie No
9. P.F. Flyers No
10. Butch wax No
11. TV test patterns that came on at night after the last show and were there until TV shows started again in the morning. (there were only 3 channels [if you were fortunate]) Yes
12. Peashooters No
13. Howdy Doody Yes
14. 45 RPM records Yes, right now I am listening to 33 1/3
15. S& H greenstamps Yes
16. Hi-fi's Yes
17. Metal ice trays with lever Yes
18. Mimeograph paper Yes
19. Blue flashbulb Yes
20. Packards Yes
21. Roller skate keys Yes
22. Cork popguns No
23. Drive-ins Yes
24. Studebakers No
25. Wash tub wringers No

If you remembered 0-5 = You're still young If you remembered 6-10 = You are getting older If you remembered 11-15 = Don't tell your age, If you remembered 16-25 = You're older than dirt!
 
  #57  
Old 04-26-09, 10:13 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,031
I don't remember #1, 8 & 10 but remember 11-25 just fine - does that mean I'm too old to remember

I may have known #8 if we had went to the movies when I was kid
but I'm still young........... at least I think I am
although some days my body begs to differ
 
  #58  
Old 04-26-09, 12:41 PM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 0
[QUOTE=spdavid;1555892]1. Blackjack chewing gum(No)
2.Wax Coke-shaped bottles with colored sugar water (No)
3. Candy cigarettes (Yes)
4. Soda pop machines that dispensed glass bottles (Yes)
5. Coffee shops or diners with tableside juke boxes (Yes)
6. Home milk delivery in glass bottles with cardboard stoppers (No)
7. Party lines on the telephone (Heard about them)
8. Newsreels before the movie(No)
9. P.F. Flyers (Yes)
10. Butch wax (No)
11. TV test patterns that came on at night after the last show and were there until TV shows started again in the morning. (Yes and the National Anthem AND changing the channel with pliers after the knobs got stripped out.)
12. Peashooters (No)
13. Howdy Doody (No)
14. 45 RPM records (Yes)
15. S& H greenstamps (No)
16. Hi-fi's (Yes)
17. Metal ice trays with lever (Yes)
18. Mimeograph paper (Yes, sniff)
19. Blue flashbulb (Yes)
20. Packards (No)
21. Roller skate keys (No)
22. Cork popguns(Yes)
23. Drive-ins (Yes)
24. Studebakers (No)
25. Wash tub wringers (No)

The paper boy. Kid with a bike and a bag. Had a friend that did it 27 years ago. The last one?
As opposed to now; the "paper man" tossing papers out the open car window @ 35 MPH; with the stereo up full blast at 5:00AM.
 
  #59  
Old 04-27-09, 02:33 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,031
I used to be a paper boy but never could [or knew anybody that could] deliver the paper from a bicycle. After you pack 90-100 newspapers in the 2 bags, it was all you could do to ride your bike from the street corner where you picked up the papers to your route. No way could you ride a bike and fold papers to throw and if you folded them first - they wouldn't fit in the bag.

The 'rules' where different back then to. The paper had to be on the porch/stoop and if it was raining [or expected] the paper had to be left where it wouldn't get wet - no plastic bags back then. 1st complaint = warning, 2nd complaint = fired.... but you made a little over $11 per week and with tips it often went as high as $15 I also got several grass cuttin jobs on the route at $2-3 a pop
 
  #60  
Old 04-30-09, 03:57 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 8,629
Originally Posted by marksr View Post
I used to be a paper boy but ......... the paper had to be left where it wouldn't get wet - no plastic bags back then.
I get my paper delivered in a plastic bag. They leave it outside my locked porch, in the rain, and the paper is perfectly dry. I wonder why it took so long for someone to come up with the idea. ??
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'