Amazing car racing and drivers

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  #1  
Old 08-02-09, 02:48 PM
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Amazing car racing and drivers

Since the Pocono was rained out they had running of the amazing Rally cars (not like the NASCAR tanks that only drive when conditions are perfect). - It is a series of cars that run in all weather on many different surfaces and types from concrete straightaways, left and right corners on hard pavement including a city circuit, a tight, twisting dirt section complete with 70' jumps. There are 2 cars at a time running a long course on 2 different layout and when they finish with one, they switch over the the other without stopping - time total determines the winner. All cars have a driver and a co-pilot/navigator reading note to the driver because they run so fast on a variable tough circuit. Very entertaining and a good showing of good driving, ordinary cars with preparation and planning.

It was very entertaining and refreshing from the boring NASCAR combination of WWE/WWF and the old Roller derby with the announcers that can only say one or two sentences before handing off to someone so everyone can think about what is happening. Also, no green, white, checker finishes for publicity, commercials and programmed suspense situations. - Ever notice how many team cars of the teams in 2nd, 3rd and 4th race back in the crowd have minor tank accident to delay things and force a restart to make up position?

This was very interesting and more entertaining on TV than than NASCAR or Indy/similar cars.

On TV, I love Formula 1 because of the cars/engineering and drivers that run a 1200# car over a curb on a corner and the good commentators.

For being there, I prefer dirt tracks and Formula 1.

For serious being there I like Formula 1, but the cost and availability of tickets ($200+ ticket price if you can get one a couple of years ahead) is huge and not practical, but the feeling and conditions of the 200,000 crowd is fun even if you cannot see much of the 2-4 miles track. A good seat where they come to tighter than 90 degree corner at 30 mph at the end of a 200 mph straight is amazing if you can some how get a ticket.

Too bad the Formula 1 group scrapped the U.S. Grand Prix race date, but the global TV audience was not there and the big sponsors did not like the race, but gave it a 3 years or so try. - I just have to stay up late (1:00 AM) to see the Asian races (Australia, Indonesia, China, Japan) or get up at 6:00 AM to watch the live European race broadcasts (Dubai, Turkey, Hungary, Germany, Italy, France, England and Spain etc.).

Dick
 
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  #2  
Old 08-02-09, 03:07 PM
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durn Dick I would have liked to have seen that..here they re-ran the Indy race til I turned over to golf.

I think I've said it before..but I disagree on the F-1 vs Nascar. I like the fact that at least they go back out if they get some damage in Nascar..hammer and duct tape appeals to me. F1 and Indy, if they get any damage..thats it..they're out (most times). Heck..give anyone with some talent, all electronic controls and telemetry, onboard jacks, 2-3 mil per car..they may win. Whats the guys name thats a 7 time champ in F1? Great driver I'm sure..but the company just had a better car.

I like some of the things in Nascar where they try to restrict the equipment and make it more strategy and talent (both driver and crew).

really..I used to like drag racing...but that was a few years ago...the TV coverage just isn't there.
 
  #3  
Old 08-02-09, 04:40 PM
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Duct tape is an amazing invention and relates well to the TV audience. An oval is just too boring and complicated by the the "team strategy". That is why I also like good dirt track racing where they have to adjust the driving to the track conditions. Nothing is better than a cooler and night racing in southern VA or northern NC.

Most Formula 1 drivers will walk the 2.5 mile or more track several times a day before getting into car. - That is after they spend the required 3 hours in the fitness module for the drivers and crew that is the last thing to load into and out of the first 747 to arrive. The press arrives later in another - big bucks!!. The good drivers spend more time than required because of the G forces on the body (fitness is a very, very big thing), but they are technically qualified, can communicate and get big money ($20 - $40 million per year salary plus endorsements if they give them plus winning bonuses). - They also have to be technical enough be and communicate the real driving back to the pit and crew (the real life between the computers and real racing) and possibly why Montoya left the big money and took a big hit in the income to go to NASCAR since he could not get a F1 car to drive.

There a few great NASCAR drivers that really enjoy the other forms of racing and treat it as a vacation and pleasant break. Others only do what is required by the sponsor. Tony Stewart races for the fun and others do it for money and ego - Tony just gives away a lot to charities. Rickie Rudd was down to earth and loved to talk about racing just as Paul Newman (just don't ask for an autograph) was, but he had a chance to start his passion too late in life.

On TV, the road racers running through whatever they (driver & navigator) get into at full throttle over/through mud and snow on real roads is good because of the coverage on a 40-60 mile section. They seem to be insane, but many Finns and Germans end up as very successful in Formula 1 drivers. The Brazilians and Argentinians also do very well, but American drivers never seem to make it to Formula 1.

I had free air tickets to Budapest, Hungary and free housing with friends, but could not get race tickets starting a month or two before the F1 race, so I had to watch it on at 2:00 PM the Speed channel (delayed because of Fox got it for the 3 4 races they bought the exclusive rights for), after I got up at 5:30 AM for the normal time for live broadcasts. Unfortunately, a billion or two people knew the results before the broadcast in the U.S., but fortunately the internet was too current a spoiled the race results.

I just enjoy a 1200# car going at 200 mph that is usually governed at about 19,000 rpms powered by a 2 liter, or so, engine since braking and driving is the important factor. Not a normal street machine, but what NASCAR tank with interchangeable sheet metal and with any engine is representative of what people use or could actually relate to.

Just some personal opinions.

Dick
 
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Old 08-02-09, 04:59 PM
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Hey see we agree on several things..Tony likes to race...dirt asphalt whatever. And heck Ricky lived just across the river from me in VA. Sometimes he showed up at our local dirt track incognito, just to have fun (so I was told)..he may still be.

I worked the Long Beach Gran Prix race back in 79-80 (?)...never met a bunch of bigger A-holes in my life..drivers, crew and staff..all had this "my stuff don't stink" attitude. probably affects my opinion.

I think guys like Marcus Ambrose and Juan Pablo are a great addition. We'll have to see if someone like Danica can ever make it..(I really don't think so)
 
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Old 08-02-09, 08:30 PM
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I think Danica will be around as long as she can carry the torch and sell commercials.

Rudd is/was a real "pearl" of a racer for years. When I lived in the Tidewater area, I visited the shop several times and once got a pit pass for the NASCAR race in Richmond. A great person!!!

I can't say much about Montoya since he got dropped by the F1 teams. He certainly can drive!

I am really not a fan of the street races because they are too flat with no room, no variable banking or scenery.

My real thrill was at the first Indy F1 race (seats on the first and second terns). We had pit/paddock tickets got into the pits for the Saturday qualifying was because my son was the appearance, same age, height and weight as Michael Schumacher and just happened to wear his his old high school jersey. I had on a real Jaguar pit crew shirt autographed by Jackie Stewert (Ebay purchase) that the drivers and crew recognized.

Every year, I would go to my lake home near Brainerd. MN for a week of fishing and relaxation and the annual races at BIR (no more real car racing now - only dragsters and motorcycles on the 2.5 mile track but still a lot of activity) I was about a mile from the track. I did not know it until a year or two later, but Paul Newman and occasionally Mario Andretti would join him to race and because of the other race drivers. One day, Paul was on the dock fishing and I unhooked his snagged line from a lily pad without knowing who was hiding under the hat. The next day during qualifying he recognized me and came over and explained what was going on. At that time, you could walk around the cars that were being worked on and look as long you did not touch when they were try to out in a new Toyota engine in a few minutes. He was a gifted racer, but started racing when everyone his age was retiring and went though another 10 years or so doing what he wanted to do after making money and starting foundations.

It is fun to follow and be around road racing because of the people and the casual surroundings.

Now I just look for good dirt track racing on a weekend night.

Dick - just another racing fan
 
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Old 08-08-09, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Concretemasonry View Post
, but the cost and availability of tickets ($200+ ticket price if you can get one a couple of years ahead) is huge and not practical, but the feeling and conditions of the 200,000 crowd is fun even if you cannot see much of the 2-4 miles track. A good seat where they come to tighter than 90 degree corner at 30 mph at the end of a 200 mph straight is amazing if you can some how get a ticket.
The 12 Hours of Sebring, when I saw it in person in the 70's was inexpensive and you were able to walk around and go up to the fence at various locations to see them handle the straightaways, curves and slow for hairpin turn on that roadcourse.
 
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Old 08-08-09, 05:46 PM
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On the Sunday's my wife worked, I would go by the nursing home after church where her mother was to visit and take stuff to her. One Sunday, I walked in and she shushed me and told me to sit down and watch. She was in her 80's and watching Sebring!!! I asked why she was watching that, and she informed me who was winning, how many wrecks there had been, all the goodies. Goodness, I guess there's no age limit.
 
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Old 08-09-09, 02:21 PM
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Ha! I bet if you asked her she will say she has seen Smokey and the Bandit.

Edit, unless of course she is no longer with us.
 
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Old 08-09-09, 06:28 PM
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Edit correct, but I wouldn't doubt she had watched it.
 
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