Ever try or consider to work for big $ overseas?

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  #1  
Old 10-25-09, 02:56 PM
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Ever try or consider to work for big $ overseas?

A guy popped into my friends last night and said he is someone not tied down and likes to move around a lot. He is going to look into working for one of the big global engineering firms, where he said you can make siinful money setting up 3rd world countries with stuff we think is easy, like warehouses, pumping systems, and more.

I told him that years ago, there were people I knew that left the area to go to Alaska to work on the oil pipeline. They would work extra long hours so many days on and have so many days off. Big money.

Also, guys would do that on off-shore oil wells. A lot of money compared to what otherr workers make, if you are able to not be tied down.

Just curious...... and also curious if these opportunities are really out there today. Also, you hear people say in the same breath that it is 'tax free money'. Not sure about that part of it, though, any more.
 
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Old 10-25-09, 03:08 PM
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A friend back in the early 80's got out of the Navy at something like 12 yrs service. (stayed in the Reserves) Signed up with a company doing training in Saudi Arabia? I think? He had to stay gone for 1 full year to avoid taxes..but he made enough to pay off his house, cars and put money in the bank.

Now things may be real different..and dangerous
 
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Old 10-26-09, 08:29 AM
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So a guy could be gone a year?, squirrel away $70G's let's say, come back with that money, and not pay taxes on it? Seriously?

Something don't sound right. Surely they must have closed that loophole by now. But, actually it sounds like if they made that 1 year rule, someone thought it out already in the gov't.. What kind of rationale went with allowing that? I don't believe the Constitution says anything about where the income came from. Just income.
 
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Old 10-26-09, 02:47 PM
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I turned down a opportunity when I was getting out of the AF 2 years ago. I got offered a job as a aircraft mechanic working in Kuwait. Started at $125k+ a year, zero taxes because it was considered a "imminant danger/war/combat zone", but didn't take it because of my family situation. If I were single, I would have taken it. I still know lots of ex GI's who did these types of jobs and some hated it with a passion because the company was corrupt for one reason or another. Remember, you dont pay any taxes if you are in a country directly supporting the war effort, i.e. Saudi, Turkey, Kuwait, Iraq, etc and you must be there at least 30 days.
 
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Old 10-26-09, 02:47 PM
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I knew some guys back in the 70's and 80's that worked outside of the US and they claimed their income was tax free. If I remember correctly, they were only allowed to be in the USA for only so many days a year or they had to pay tax on the entire amount.

A friend of mine had a brother who was a carpenter and worked in Saudi Arabia in the early 70's and made 40k a year, tax free..... but it was a big culture difference. The compound where he and his family stayed was more or less like the US but off the compound it was a big culture shock. Infidelity was a hanging offense! Also the only milk they could get was canned or powder. Him and his family wasn't thrilled with living over there for 2 yrs but when he came back to live in the US he was able to build a house for cash money
 
  #6  
Old 10-26-09, 03:39 PM
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Working and living internationally can be a very great and profitable experience if you are up to it. Expect some changes in habit - some people call it restrictive and some call it a real learning experience. Any way you call it, no one can take away what you experienced.

Every country has different laws for working and and time required to be out of the country. I had a friend that worked for an American company in Iran (years ago). The company/US/Iran required he be out of the country for about 4 days every quarter and return to the US annually. Every every quarter he got to choose where (France, Turkey, Germany he wanted to spend a long week end with his family.

It all depends on where you work and what company you work for.

I have sent a lot of time in 37 countries and worked with many Americans working there. They all have the same common trait - accept what is there, understand it, enjoy it and take pictures to remind your self later. If you look around, you can find many "U.S. expatriots" in every country that want to meet people recently from the U.S. and know how to work within the local system/requirements. - If you can check around to find where the U.S. people go to meet others (free cocktail hours at hotels that are not controlled, etc) and you can meet new friends that want you and others to go to their house for dinner, etc. I remember a Super Bowl party in a home in India give by a man from the U.S. and and his English wife.

I had a friend I met and worked with in Kuwait. When he came to the U.S. to ride a cycle, he always called me and we found a way to meet if possible. Once, I had to take a trip to India and had a long (8 hours) layover in Dubai so, I contacted him before I left. Somehow, he managed to get a company paid flight to Dubai and met me and got us into the the "Burj" hotel for a tour (only 7 star hotel around, $2500 minimum room rate) that we visited during the construction on the 30th floor. It was the best layover I ever had. The people I met were one of the best things about international travel IF you can get out and around in some way.

The tax laws are changing every day, especially with the world shrinking and the U.S. slipping relatively (economically and educationally). Because of this look at every option and assume it can change since foreign countries change much quicker than the U.S.

Most people do not just do it for the money, but because of what they learn about where they are. I have enjoyed the hardships of every time I left the U.S.

If you are open to the travel problems and inconvenient housing it is still profitable in the end.
 
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Old 10-30-09, 06:02 PM
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Thanks for some good replies.

And to Concrete,

I hope you write all your experiences in some journal, for your family. You've had quite the life so far, it sounds.

I am on my parents about doing this, regarding the family tree and stories they have to tell from before I ever knew them. And they haven't ever really been anywhere, like you have.
 
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Old 10-31-09, 04:10 AM
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Ec, I missed the opportunity (or put it off too long) to get detailed stuff on my wife's dad. He was a pilot for Air America in SE Asia. He was really reluctant to put anything in writing. What I did gather was, when he made it to a LZ in odd places like Laos, he stopped the aircraft, kept the engine running, never looked back, listened for the double tap on the door, turned around and took off. He never knew what his cargo was. He "lost air" on one mission and drove into a mountain. Survived but lost his right arm in the process.
I mentioned in another post, my wife was telling her grandson about his involvement with the CIA on Face Book, and as soon as she hit "send", a pop up notified her it would be erased, and she lost the entire communication. Weird, after 45 years.
Odd thing, he was a 300 bowler prior to this. Learned to do it left handed and accomplished the same thing. Amazing.
 
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Old 10-31-09, 08:47 AM
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Ever try or consider to work for big $ overseas?

ecman -

I have started to write my "Chronicles". Since I type much slower than I think, I bought a voice recognition software program (Dragon Naturally Speaking - $99 retail and $60 on Ebay) with headphones and a microphone that takes what you say and puts it into a Word document. It works pretty good, to capture ideas, but you still have to run a spell checker for errors and then organize the rough document before adding it to the main document. I am about half done with 10 of the estimated 20 chapters and figure this phase will be done in 2011 and then I can start really cleaning it up and reorganizing.

For the last 15 years i have a lot of photos from my international work and travel. The photos are great to jog the memory and use to get in touch with others from that country and other countries that worked with me. The people you meet working internationally can end up being even closer friens when you get home.

If you do work anywhere, make sure you have a camera with you at all times (working, eating and socializing). The experience can never be taken away and photos revive the memories.

ecman - If you are from the Eau Claire area, I have a section about my travels and fishing from Hayward to Shell Lake to Rice Lake (Blue Hills area) to Eau Claire and along the Chippewa River.

Dick
 

Last edited by Concretemasonry; 10-31-09 at 09:54 AM.
  #10  
Old 10-31-09, 11:29 AM
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Chandler,

There are some truly amazing people out there. Unless you hear about stories like yours, you can easily presume that everyone lives a rather ordinary life, with everyone doing about the same things in life. Not so. And people who can overcome (especially depressing) obstacles, are truly amazing.
 
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Old 10-31-09, 11:39 AM
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Dick,

Ever work for KBR? for the big bucks?

You going to create a blog, or something on the web, so that any of us interested folks could read about your interesting life?

Did you happen to see The Travel Channel the otehr day with Andrew Zimmern, where the show focused on Wisconsin? And he delivered mail off a tour boat on Lake Geneva; and in Hayward, he tried balancing on a log in the water, up against a 3-time world champion woman in that event, and tried running across a string of logs in the water, and tried speed-climbing a tree; and how he visited the only Limburger cheese factory in the U.S.(he absolutely loved the cheese) in Monroe, Wisconsin? It made me feel proud of my state. None of the people who were teaching him or being interviewed came across as cheesehead hicks.
 
  #12  
Old 10-31-09, 12:24 PM
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Being involved in the maintenance, management of rentals (especially trailers the attract temporaries and tornadoes) can be be a ig problem since they are not dedicated to a "home" in the long term.

Andrew Zimmern is just human garbage disposal. that lived somewhere near me for a while.

The information on Limburger cheese made in Monroe, Wisconsin is interesting and will find it in the next few weeks as I look into my genealogy and try to discover the skeletons in the family.

Tomorrow, will be the big game in GB with the humble Brett Favre returning after the city and mayor temporarily changed the Minnesota Street sign to Rodgers Boulevard. - They all play it for what it is worth.

Sorry about getting off the original post, but sometimes neighbors have something in common.

Dick
 
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