How To Change A VW Bug Belt In 5 Seconds

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  #1  
Old 09-17-10, 07:09 AM
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Smile How To Change A VW Bug Belt In 5 Seconds

YouTube - The Original Fast Volkswagen Belt Change.
 
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Old 09-17-10, 03:00 PM
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Like to see him try that on my Cummins. Impressive.
 
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Old 09-17-10, 03:02 PM
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Or a serpentine belt vehicle!
 
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Old 09-17-10, 03:14 PM
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If only it were that easy still to work on cars.
 
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Old 09-18-10, 04:22 AM
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The reality of it is, you can change the belt on the VW with the engine still. Start with the belt on the crank and place it over the generator pulley top left as tight as possible. Bump the engine and it's on. To remove one.....it's called a razor knife. But the video was cool.
 
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Old 09-18-10, 06:54 AM
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Last week I replaced the serpentine belt on my Dodge Ram. The old belt failed - I was driving and suddenly it sounded like a bag of cats under the hood. I pulled over and found the belt in shreds wrapped around the fan. Also wrapped around the fan was the dipstick. Apparently when the belt failed a piece grabbed the dipstick and pulled it out of the tube.

It was suprisingly easy to replace the belt. 10 minutes to unravel the old belt from the fan and 5 minutes to put on the new one.

$100 for the tow, $50 for the belt, $20 for the dipstick. Wish I had replaced it as recommended in the maintenance schedule.
 
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Old 09-18-10, 08:56 AM
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Yeah, when I changed alternators a week or so ago, I bought a new belt. I always keep the old one under the driver's seat, just in case. That way I'll never need one. Chandler's law. I also keep an extra diesel lift pump and an extra universal joint in my tool box. Had them go out previously, but never since I kept an extra one in the truck.
 
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Old 09-18-10, 12:44 PM
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Originally Posted by NEsportsfan View Post
If only it were that easy still to work on cars.
What is interesting though is back then, mechanics never hinted to the customer that working on vehicles then was easy. Then again everything back in those days (furnaces, dishwashers, fridges, etc.) before all these circuit boards and relays, thermistors or whatever, was easier. But nobody back then KNEW it was easier, because all things being relative as they are, the new stuff did not exist, so they had nothing to compare to.
 
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Old 09-18-10, 03:47 PM
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Changing the belt in that manner guarantees that you will have to change it again fairly soon. Prying a vee belt over the pulley strains the cords in the belt severely and leads to premature failure. It may also cause the belt to ride sideways or even turn over. Since changing the belt on those old beetles was insanely easy I don't know why anyone would use this quick and dirty method.


As for things "back then" being easier to work on, that was certainly true but most appliances and automobiles today will run far longer with minimal or no service than their counterparts of 30 years ago.
 
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Old 09-18-10, 04:25 PM
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Originally Posted by furd View Post

As for things "back then" being easier to work on, that was certainly true but most appliances and automobiles today will run far longer with minimal or no service than their counterparts of 30 years ago.
............except for the old bubble-top refrigerators and electric water heaters from the 50's, that had their heating element bands wrapped around the outside of the tank, and these old dinosauer cast iron boilers,(that you would 'rod out') - to name a few. Oh -and the odd Maytag dryer in the basement of one of the college rentals, highly used too!, that has unusual pulleys system in the rear and an unusual sense-heat with no timer dial.
 
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Old 09-18-10, 04:57 PM
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As for things "back then" being easier to work on, that was certainly true but most appliances and automobiles today will run far longer with minimal or no service than their counterparts of 30 years ago.
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I would disagree when it comes to post ammonia residential refrigerators. Once upon a time there was no mullion heaters to burn extra electricity or to go bad, just good thick insulated walls. There were no circulating fans to go bad, gravity seemed to work just fine. No condenser fan to to burn up or get clogged and jammed.There were no electronic thermostats just good old reliable mechanical ones easy to replace when the contacts gave up. Ok in all fairness there was no auto defrost. I have to admit that was a bummer but could we have one with just auto defrost and none of the other crap..
 
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